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The Really Small Schools

By simdan in Culture
Sat Oct 14, 2000 at 02:59:28 PM EST
Tags: Culture (all tags)
Culture

I sometimes hear how a 500 student high school is small. My response to that is I used to go to a 200 student school and I now attend a 300 student school district. What do these schools have to offer and what challenges do they face?


I like the city. Lots of things to do, places to see, things to buy. I like the school's facilities. Who wouldn't like an indoor pool, a large computer network, and maybe even a fast food joint in their school? I often sit wide-eyed when my parents talk about their schools. My dad's high school had 2,000 students and my mom's graduating class had more than 100 seniors. What I don't like is the amount of people. I feel very small there.

In larger schools, the social classes of students are distinct. You've got your jocks, your cheerleaders, your bullies, my personal favorite, the geeks, etc. There tends to be tension between the social groups, tension is not good for a learning environment. Also students don't get as much attention from the teachers since there are many more students the teachers need to work with.

In the small schools, the ones with K-12 all in one building the size of two or three small football fields, the social lines are greatly blurred. Your starting quarterback of the football team could very well be the star alto sax in the jazz band. I admit that it is not perfect, you still have your bullies who pick on the bookworms. But conflicts are not as large overall.

In your one building schools, students get more help from the teachers. Students get to know each teacher very well. Small schools are a great place to learn, provided they can get funding.

That's the catch. Funding. Without it every school is worthless. It gets you cheap equipment, 33Mhz computers, and, at times, not the best faculty. Of course, since not all small schools can fund everything, sports tend to often take priority, which can leave very little for the music, art, library, and other departments. I hate to see states cut the funding on small schools and give the large schools get even more. This been happening in some of our states, or at least in Nebraska.

Two other problems facing small schools are the difficulty to find people that share your interests, and a tendency to have low quality extra curricular actives. Perhaps for these schools in a certain radius could work together on.

Surely there must be a solution to this growing problem. Any ideas?

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Poll
What Kind Of School Do You Like Best?
o Large Public 5%
o Medium Public 16%
o Small Public 16%
o Large Private 1%
o Medium Private 8%
o Small Private 12%
o I like any school. 2%
o I hate school 37%

Votes: 87
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The Really Small Schools | 22 comments (20 topical, 2 editorial, 0 hidden)
I've experienced the opposite (3.50 / 4) (#3)
by erotus on Fri Oct 13, 2000 at 10:46:38 PM EST

You said:
"In larger schools, the social classes of students are distinct. You've got your jocks, your cheerleaders, your bullies, my personal favorite, the geeks, etc. There tends to be tension between the social groups, tension is not good for a learning environment."

I went to a high school that had around 2000 students and my graduating class was around 650 people. I found that in a smaller town the big bully effect was more predominant. In the big schools you are just another face in the crowd and you're lucky to have someone pick on you. There was really no tension that I remember. Sure, there were the jocks, preps, etc... However, I remember people hung out with their peers whith whom they participated with in extra curricular activities - Band, Choir, Drama, etc... I was in band and so were most of my friends. I had a friend who was in choir but he hung out with his qoir friends. I had a jock friend who, guess what?... hung out with his jock friends. Everyone's high school experience is different and I had an enjoyable experience in high school. I hated Jr. high though.

I try not to think of high school.... (1.85 / 7) (#4)
by skim123 on Sat Oct 14, 2000 at 01:21:05 AM EST

Having graduated five years ago I try my best to not think about it...

Money is in some respects like fire; it is a very excellent servant but a terrible master.
PT Barnum


Social lines (1.66 / 3) (#5)
by {ice}blueplazma on Sat Oct 14, 2000 at 08:06:35 AM EST

You said that the social lines are blurred in a smaller school. They aren't. I go to a school that has about 1000 students (that includes grades 7-12). We aren't really large or small. We have the oddest social lines ever. For example, many of the high schoolers know a lot of 8th graders. So when an 8th grader goes into the high school for gym you have to watch your back, lest some angered high schooler dump you in a garbage bin. What my point is, is that that high schooler throwing people in grabage bins, could very likely be the QB on the football team and play in the band, and be an A student. He might also do FPS (Future Problem Solvers, this is a program where you try and solve problems that may arise in the future). I don't think he could fit into any of your social groups. So my point is, people do what they like and the strong people don't get picked on, it has nothing to do with social standing.

"Denise, I've been begging you for the kind of love that Donny and Smitty have, but you won't let me do it, not even once!"
--Jimmy Fallon
When I was in school... (2.00 / 1) (#6)
by 0x00 on Sat Oct 14, 2000 at 09:04:23 AM EST

There wasn't so much social lines drawn, EXCEPT if you were in grade 8. Then you are known as a 'vegie'. It is the 9-12s job to make you miserable, at anytime.

Its on a never ending loop. No year will break out of it, because as soon as you hit year 9, there is a new lot of vegies.

Does anywhere else in the world call their year 8s names?

--

0x00

Vegies were clowns.
Brisbane, Australia.

[ Parent ]
in my experience smaller == more painful (2.66 / 3) (#7)
by Anonymous 242 on Sat Oct 14, 2000 at 09:15:15 AM EST

I went to a Roman Catholic elementary school with about 400 students spread throughought kindergarten to eighth grade. The early grades weren't bad, the upper grades were horrible when it came to cliques.

I went to three different high schools. The first was a fairly large Catholic high school with a couple thousand students split between four grades. While the opressive nature of the school administration sucked canal water, there was much less of an emphasis on belonging to the right crowd. Cliques still existed by the individual student was crammed into some arbitrary social category whether they liked it or not.

I spent my junior year of high school at a smallish high school in northern Kentucky. There were just over four hundred students spread out over three grades. This school scared me. All students were labeled as being a druggie, a hick or an outcast. The druggies were tolerated because that is where the hicks scored their weed from. The outcasts were persecuted fairly mercilessly.

I wound up at a fairly large public school, 2000 students across three grades. There was a heavy emphasis on cliques, but because of the size there were enough students to make every clique sizable. Despite a massive rumor problem, this school was tolerable.

Those are my three data points. YMMV.

My Experiences (3.00 / 2) (#8)
by reas0n on Sat Oct 14, 2000 at 02:04:32 PM EST

My Junior High was quite small, about 60 kids to a class, the High School I go to now is huge, with about 1000 kids to a class, and rising. Also, I spent sophomore year at a very small boarding school with only about a dozen kids to a class.

When you get as small as the boarding school, then yes, the social lines are blurred, my three best friends were a fresman, a junior, and a senior, my friends were people that, had I been at a larger school, I would probably not have been friends with.

In JH, however, thats where I found the social lines to be the strongest. Everyone knew who the "jocks" and the "geeks" were, and there was tension between them. This might just be a Junor High thigh, but from all that I have heard, I thik it also is tgrue in more medium sized High Schools

Then in High School, the situation has kind of turned around slightly. There still are the jocks and the geeks, but with the school being so large, there are so many other groups inbetween, that the lines have become so blurred. Also, I think the kids have just become smarter. Perhaps they realize that whatever reasons they might have thought they had to pick on someone before, shows to be quite silly in the light of High School. When I', doing something with computers, or having an easy time in Math, I don't get the steriotypical comtempt fom "jocks", I get a "wow, how do you do that". Each group has their strengths, and their weaknesses (although perhaps some more that others).


Small schools vs. Big Schools (2.00 / 2) (#9)
by judges1617 on Sat Oct 14, 2000 at 04:25:11 PM EST

I can't really say much about small schools due to the fact that I never attended one. My high school had 2500+ students in it and there were 9 more high schools that size in the district. I've never really enjoyed school all that much, but I am grateful for the chance to attend the school that I did. I don't care if the classes were large or the teachers never really got to know me. I was there for one purpose and that purpose was to learn as much as I could. Being a large well funded school district gave me the opportunity to have access to such things as good computer labs, a large library, among other things. The friends that I have made, that attended smaller schools, I feel did not recieve as good of an education as they might have, had they gone to a larger school. I was required to read books that many of them had never heard of and if they had, they did not know what they were about. Maybe it 's just ignorance on their part for not trying to expand their education beyond the walls of the institution. But I'm glad for the start that my school gave me and I still learn something new everyday.

Did both at the same time (4.50 / 2) (#10)
by El Volio on Sat Oct 14, 2000 at 10:08:43 PM EST

I was fortunate enough to attend two high schools simultaneously through most of my time in HS. Freshman through junior year, I attended my neighborhood comprehensive high school in the morning and a magnet high school in the afternoon. The comprehensive high school had about 1700 students, and the magnet school, about 120. My senior year, I attended the magnet school and a local university.

The difference was dramatic. I ended up with a graduating class of 12. I knew every one of my fellow alumni fairly well. I had had virtually every teacher at the school, and taken nearly every course it offered. So I had the definite benefit of a small school. The largest class I ever had was 12 students; the average was about 5. No sports; this was a science/engineering magnet. But it was a public school, part of the Dallas school district's desegregation court order, so we had lots of funding (plus all kinds of corporate sponsorships; Mobil and TI sent us lots of cool stuff and money).

Best of all possible worlds. And one that it would be nice to repeat. Unfortunately, Dallas later folded many of the magnet schools into a "supermagnet" and ruined the deal. Still, the basic problem is this: It's not replicable on a large scale. The amount spent per student in those sort of schools, when multiplied by a large quantity of students, is impossible.

Conversely, economies of scale make it hard to be able to afford nice equipment and so forth for small schools. Texas' way of fixing this was the so-called "Robin Hood plan", whereby money was taken from "richer" school districts to be sent to "poorer" school districts. Nice idea, but it ran into a lot of flak for being a "communist" or "socialist" program. But it's a pretty effective way to cure this exact problem.

And BTW, if any of the above seems incoherent, I've been sick all day, so that may happen. :\

My experience at a small school (4.00 / 1) (#11)
by Eric Fikus on Sun Oct 15, 2000 at 12:17:56 PM EST

I'm a senior at what I would consider a small school (about 950 students total, I think). I would agree that social classes here are not very distinct. It may be true that more help from individual teachers is available here; however, overall, I would be recieving a much better education if I were at a larger school. There are no longer any AP classes available here; the last one available, AP US History, was discontinued when the only teacher willing to teach it took a better job elsewhere. I hear students from other schools talking about taking three years of calculus, but at my school we're lucky to have one. Even some of the advanced classes, like Honor's English and Physics, are tought by teachers who have no idea what they're talking about.

Also, I don't know about other states, but here in Arizona smaller schools don't recieve much funding. There are a couple computers in the library and only a few classrooms have computers. The network only occasionally works.

The end result is that I look much less attractive to college admission officials. For me going to a small school has definitely been a handicap that isn't easy to overcome.



My experience at a small school (1.00 / 1) (#12)
by Eric Fikus on Sun Oct 15, 2000 at 12:17:56 PM EST

I'm a senior at what I would consider a small school (about 950 students total, I think). I would agree that social classes here are not very distinct. It may be true that more help from individual teachers is available here; however, overall, I would be recieving a much better education if I were at a larger school. There are no longer any AP classes available here; the last one available, AP US History, was discontinued when the only teacher willing to teach it took a better job elsewhere. I hear students from other schools talking about taking three years of calculus, but at my school we're lucky to have one. Even some of the advanced classes, like Honor's English and Physics, are tought by teachers who have no idea what they're talking about.

Also, I don't know about other states, but here in Arizona smaller schools don't recieve much funding. There are a couple computers in the library and only a few classrooms have computers. The network only occasionally works.

The end result is that I look much less attractive to college admission officials. For me going to a small school has definitely been a handicap that isn't easy to overcome.



I know how you feel (5.00 / 1) (#20)
by {ice}blueplazma on Mon Oct 16, 2000 at 06:08:15 PM EST

I just two years ago graduated from a small elementary school. We had absolutely no funding. It took over three years to get new computers. $900 computers!! Before that the computers we had were from 1981 and older. We also had the worst equipment. We hadn't gotten new desks for 16 or 17 years. Fortunately we had good teachers.

So, I feel your pain.

"Denise, I've been begging you for the kind of love that Donny and Smitty have, but you won't let me do it, not even once!"
--Jimmy Fallon
[ Parent ]
Small Schools promote wide interests (none / 0) (#13)
by EvilNed on Sun Oct 15, 2000 at 05:56:48 PM EST

I went to a mall school in rural montana. About 160-170 in the high school, the junior high was in the same building as well. What it did for me was force me to broaden my interests. After specializing in percussion in a larger school, my band director talked me into singing for the choir. After seeing me watch my brother's wrestle, the coach talked me into going out for wrestling. I got into all of the things I did in high school, because the teachers had enough time to talk me into doing other things, and enough time to coach me enough that I could compete at it. Instead of being a funky drummer with a bit of a computer fetish, I ended up being well versed in all of music, and being able to be included with the "jocks" too. I wasnt pigeon hole myself because the teacher around me didnt pigeon hole me to begin with. It wasnt all great though, I had trouble finding like minded people to talk with (usually found other people when state competitions came about) and the ability to specialize was very limited. Our state requires a vocational credit to graduate from high school, and because of the size of the school I could only choose between T&I (machine shop), Wood Shop, or Home Ec. If they had a programming class, or just about anything else, I would have taken it. Instead I wasted a semester in wood shop. Small price to pay to be well rounded.

"My head hurts, my feet stink and I dont love Jesus." -- Jimmy Buffett


Large schools can have more diversity (none / 0) (#14)
by a humble lich on Sun Oct 15, 2000 at 07:27:00 PM EST

   The advantage a large school can have is that there is more likely to be a group of people like you. The school I went to had about 2200 students and, although I was a big nerd, I was able to be part of a social group who respected my acting and lighting design talents.
   One could say that large Universities are just an extension of this. Once you get 20,000 students you start to lose the clique concept, and when you meet somebody new they don't already have preconceptions based on who your friends are (or compared to a small school it is possible to meet new people).


There are pros and cons (of course). (none / 0) (#15)
by Merekat on Mon Oct 16, 2000 at 05:59:05 AM EST

My primary school (age 5-12) had 64 students in it and two teachers. The main disadvantage of a school that small is that the facilities available were proportionate to the number of people, so there were basically no interesting extras until the school saved up and bought a BBC Micro and some gym equipment in my last year there. However, as there were 4 different year groups in each class, teachers rarely had time to do anything beyond the basic maths, english and compulsory irish language, so equipment doesn't matter if there's no time to use it. The staff often also had their hands full with some very disruptive elements, which affected more of the school than in a larger environment.

Smaller does not necessarily foster a sense of community, however. In this case, the school had a bad record of bullying, possibly one of the worst I've ever heard of. Rather, people did pick on minorities but unlike in a larger place, you never stood a chance of being more than a minority of one, so there was nobody to back you up.

So much for the bad points, what were the plus points? Well, I think I had a lot more freedom in my education than people who went to larger, more organised schools. Once I'd done my assignments, I could do what I wanted within reason. This included been given the manual for the school's only precious computer and told to go for it, doing a survey of the local population over 100 years and more of that kind of thing. Interesting, fun, and not on the curriculum. Admittedly, this is because the teaching staff were overworked and couldn't spoonfeed.

My secondary school (13-18 years) was double the size, with a whole 160 students<g>, but much better staffed. This meant that there was more focus on students as individuals than I feel there would have been in a larger school. The year groups were not streamed by grades, except for maths and english, where the syllabus for each was different. People have asked if I felt this held me back. I don't think so. It made me aware that people don't always 'get' things first time, and sometimes not even at all. And that this could happen to me too. This experience was invaluable when it came to going to university.

The ghettoisation element was also less pronounced in this larger environment. People still marginalise others, but it tended to be groups, not individuals who were bullied, and the agressive group was not necessarily the larger.

So, what is my point? Well, basically that there are good and bad points to small schools and that the conditions there will not suit everybody. It suited me, but on the other hand I could not go back to a community that small now. There is also more to the school than size and funding. The first and less pleasant school was a catholic state school, the second, non-denominational Quaker run, private, and held together with shoelaces. Not perfect, but it suited me more than other schools in the area.

Did going to a small school make be unable to deal with larger crowds? I don't think so. University had 12,000 people and involved moving to the city. I loved it. And I think that had a lot to do with coming from a small environment. The author of the article said they feel vary small in large groups. I was happy as I'd finally found somewhere I could disappear.
---
I've always had the greatest respect for other peoples crack-pot beliefs.
- Sam the Eagle, The Muppet Show

200 not small either (none / 0) (#16)
by DesiredUsername on Mon Oct 16, 2000 at 07:55:14 AM EST

I changed schools multiple times in my school career, and let me tell you 200 students is NOT small.

K, 1st, 2nd and half of 3rd grade I went to a smallish private school (around 30-50 students per grade). Then I moved to Iowa and saw what a REALLY small school looks like. For the rest of 3rd and all of 4th grade, I was one of two people in my grade. For 5th, 6th and 7th, I was the only person in my grade. The entire school had about 20 students and that's K-8. We had two teachers: One taught K-5 (about 12 students in one room) the other taught 6-8 (about 8 students in another room). One room was a library and one room was storage. Then we also had a basement and a big playground. That's it.

For 8th grade through sophmore year, I was in the public school in the same area--still less then 100 kids per grade. Then we moved to Missouri and I graduated HS in a class of almost exactly 100.

Play 囲碁
I Forgot :) (none / 0) (#21)
by simdan on Mon Oct 16, 2000 at 08:29:42 PM EST

I did forget to mention that for the first couple of months in kindergarten, I attended a small school were there were only a handfull of students. I was one of only two kindergarteners.

[ Parent ]
150 is a natural size (none / 0) (#17)
by selkirk on Mon Oct 16, 2000 at 01:15:19 PM EST

I'll probably get this wrong, but I recall reading that 150 is some sort of socialogical "magic number" for human group sizes. One example given was of a aboriginal tribe that had a rule that they had to split the tribe everytime they reached the population of 150. I have also seen this in business management literature. (I think Richard(?) Branson practices this technique.)
150 is about the number of people who the average person can form relationships with. Beyond that, people have to start anonymizing and dehumanizing interactions with other people. I think this is part of the cause of the geek/jock/band etc social demarcations in larger schools. This also helps explain how some kids &quot;fall through the cracks,&quot; such as in the columbine case. Think of a teacher with 5 classes of 25 students. Take away The other teachers and administrators and personal acquintances, and that teacher can only form relationships with a portion of their students, let alone with other students at the same school who don't take their classes.

150 is a natural size (none / 0) (#18)
by selkirk on Mon Oct 16, 2000 at 01:16:58 PM EST

I'll probably get this wrong, but I recall reading that 150 is some sort of socialogical "magic number" for human group sizes. One example given was of a aboriginal tribe that had a rule that they had to split the tribe everytime they reached the population of 150. I have also seen this in business management literature. (I think Richard(?) Branson practices this technique.)
150 is about the number of people who the average person can form relationships with. Beyond that, people have to start anonymizing and dehumanizing interactions with other people. I think this is part of the cause of the geek/jock/band etc social demarcations in larger schools. This also helps explain how some kids &quot;fall through the cracks,&quot; such as in the columbine case. Think of a teacher with 5 classes of 25 students. Take away The other teachers and administrators and personal acquintances, and that teacher can only form relationships with a portion of their students, let alone with other students at the same school who don't take their classes.

150 (none / 0) (#22)
by mcowger on Tue Oct 17, 2000 at 10:00:12 AM EST

I took a anthro class, I remember there was some dispute about this number. ~150 was the largest size for an ISOLATED group that could funtion together. Some other number floating about for highfunctioning group were things like 25 (a max per class #? maybe).... Of course, I may think this because my graduating class was 40....
--Matt
[ Parent ]
Graduate #13 of 26, class of '97 (4.00 / 1) (#19)
by teeheehee on Mon Oct 16, 2000 at 03:05:53 PM EST

I was lucky and unlucky to have a small school education.

My entire pre-college schooling took place in a segmented building (grade-range segmented), K-12 averaging about 450 kids per year, total. My graduating class (although a smaller one than the usual ~35) was 26. I ranked dead center, lucky number 13, and this is a little background about why my school was good and bad (as they all are)...:

My school was in a very fortunate situation, as it is in a town with 70% of the land owned by Niagra Mohawk (power company, northern New York), which made per-capita taxes very low. Most of the economy in that area is low-income, ranging from logging to farming to Mom & Pop's stores. Added to that, my school was very well funded by the state. The average student, I would say, came from a lower-middle-class home. The funding our school got would more reflect an upper-middle-class dichotomy, so for who was there to attend they had a lot of benefits that might not be shared by those less advantageous as to have so much funding for such a small school. Also, the school catered to two large townships by area, but sparsely populated, with a school-bus route diameter of approx. 50 miles at some points... it's quite rural up there.

The dichotamy of the classes was diversified by many factors. There were the jocks and the geeks, but not as well defined because they were also the band members, the National Honor Society members, the French clubbers, in fact anyone who wanted to be a part of any organization could be. I participated in as many activities as I could fit into my schedule, and sometimes even if they overlapped a little bit. I (geek) was there with them (jocks) - there was still the tension, even when we were working together, for almost everything. I participated in sports with them, they played instruments right next to me, and we were all still in competition for the grades. The memes were harder to distinguish, until you came down to the behavioral level - who acts more aggressive, who tends to be more introverted, who parties more, who wears black more....

I knew everyone in my class - I would say to the point of too much in many cases, and the same was true about me. Rumors spread faster than the sound of one hand clapping, and were often the cause for the disputes any kids had. I am not much on making or spreading rumors, so I was excluded from the social groups which practiced it the most, which was almost everyone. I had two other people I could truly relate to well, one was a star soccer player, the other was amazing at just about everything but sports. Sports were pretty much the main concern for many of the parents in the area (it might help the kid get a scholarship to college - who wouldn't want that, especially if they might not be able to send their kid to college with the earnings they have), but there were still programs like Speaking Team and a decent music program (many of the people who played in the concert band also made up the marching band, several were in the jazz band, and quite a few sang in the chorus - of which my friends and I did all of the above, while juggling any other extra-curricular activities like Honor Society, French Club, Student Government, etc). Not all of the students were able to participate in these programs open to everyone (quite literally - if I wanted to join a sports team, I was automatically included, even for Varsity level, as we simply didn't have a need to make any cuts to the teams). For some of the students that wouldn't participate it was lack of motivation - sometimes caused by strife in their households (which there was more than enough of), some of them were holding part-time jobs to help take care of their families (again, household issues), and others just plain didn't care to. Those that didn't care to do anything formed their own little cliche as well. A lot of this last cliche were real leatherneckers, the rough kids who could, and sometimes were the bullies. The PHYSICAL bullies. The mental warfare was more common between all cliches, with the introverts taking the brunt of most of the flack. What's new, there, though?

The teacher-to-student ration was perfect, in my opinion. If a student had a truly debilitating condition, like ADD, they may have a different class structure which includes a lot of special education centered classes and extra attention from special ed teachers. In the general classroom most people were up to speed with whatever was being taught, and only a few were really pushing the envelope. If a genius kid were in my school I would imagine they would feel stifled, but if the gene pool allows for that to happen they most likely will move to a place where they would be more accepted and find the intelligence challenges they are looking for. A very average level education was received by most of the students. However, there were the AP courses senior year, I took AP Programming (PASCAL !!!) and AP Calculus, but there was also AP English - not a large variety, but it's better than nothing, and it touches on a couple different fields (for reference, there were four (4) people in the AP Programming class, those two friends of mine I just mentioned, myself, and one more student who was our valedictorian and was about as outcast as I was for not having much of a socialite lifestyle - mostly due to parental choice... the AP Calc class had almost everyone in it, the AP English had two (2) kids in it - one being my friend good at everything but didn't play sports).

How was my school good? Students were well catered to by the teachers (although some students might disagree with me), there were many, many oppertunities to extend their persuits (athletic, scholastic, etc.), the funding was generally higher than what would exist there if taxes were taken from the number of and tax range of the families living there.

How was my school bad? Almost like MTV's "The Real World", there was no choice in who you had to deal with every day, which was pretty much everyone for a blend of 6 grade levels that you will see in the hallways (or classrooms). Not a lot of variety, and a fairly closed culture, but as usual if your the biggest you'll get your way and if you're the smallest (Hello!) you'll probably learn to cope because there's nothing else to do.

I like the city, too - that's why I moved to Boston for college - I needed to immerse myself in the body of technology and culture. I haven't kept up in sports, or really any extracurricular activities sponsored by my college except for an events club, but I've noticed the background I've had - based on the experiences I was fortunate to receive - have played such an amazing roll in the amount and level of respect I receive from others who had a more typical large school atmosphere. The experiences I had remind me of being a Renaissance man in getting as much of everything out there in me, whereas in larger schools only the creme de la creme make it to the sports teams or the chorus or what-have-you.

Conclusion: School size plays a roll, indeed, but how far one goes to use the facilities any school gives determines how "good" the school is (IMHO). Because I was able to be a part of a lot of organizations I am (again, IMHO) a well rounded individual, and am greatful for my past. However, because my school was so small, it was a constant strain on my psyche from all the peers I had who didn't understand me. True, a large school offers the chance for anonymity and finding others like myself, I seriously doubt I would be who and what I am today if I could have only been part of the things I am really exceptional at, instead of expanding my interest in.

(Sorry for the verbosity, couldn't find a way to crop anything without changing the feel... :-) )


(Discordia) :: Hail Eris!
Everything you've just read was poetry and art - no infringement!

The Really Small Schools | 22 comments (20 topical, 2 editorial, 0 hidden)
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