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[P]
Have a break.

By inspire in Culture
Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 01:05:57 PM EST
Tags: etc (all tags)
/etc

Pulling all-nighters to study/work getting you down?

Caffeine is one of the universally accepted psychoactive drugs, yet some people dislike the strong, bitter taste of most coffees. Common workarounds are the cafe latte, which is a coffee rich in milk, or the iced coffee. Both these drinks are excellent introductions to the world of caffeine, and can give new users a taste of the world of benefit caffeine has to offer.


Basic Iced Coffee
  • half a teaspoon of instant coffee
  • half a teaspoon of sugar
  • 3 large scoops of ice-cream

Put coffee, sugar in cup. Fill cup 1/4 full of boiling water. Stir until all the coffee/sugar has dissolved. Add three scoops of ice-cream.

Enjoy.

(meta-comment: yes, I'm really trying to turn kuro5hin into a recipe swap site. rusty has to add a recipe section to scoop. I haven't had much sleep).

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Display: Sort:
Have a break. | 50 comments (48 topical, 2 editorial, 0 hidden)
Other sources... (2.25 / 4) (#1)
by markbach on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 02:08:48 AM EST

I'm partial to Penguin Mints and Starbucks bottled Frappaccuino mmmmmm.......Frappaccuino.
---
Mark

If your computer says LINUX, run...computers can't talk (unless you have text-to-speech software)
Unless you have an workplace coffee fund... (3.50 / 2) (#3)
by inspire on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 02:15:51 AM EST

Making your own will save you heaps. I'm a poor student, ergo fancy coffee is an indulgence, not a staple. Of course, dot-com employees can drink designer coffee until they vomit from caffeine poisioning.

The bastards.

I figure by 'rolling your own' coffee, you at least get more control over various parameters such as the amount of coffee, water, icecream, milk, etc. It's perfectly suited to the Linux user who likes to tweak with his config files under /etc to get a system running /just/ the way he wants it to. The Microsoft-user of coffee would walk into a McDonalds and say, "I'd like a coffee, thanks".
--
What is the helix?
[ Parent ]

Welcome... (none / 0) (#4)
by DigDug on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 02:19:22 AM EST

I figure by 'rolling your own' coffee, you at least get more control over various parameters such as the amount of coffee, water, icecream, milk, etc. It's perfectly suited to the Linux user who likes to tweak with his config files under /etc to get a system running /just/ the way he wants it to. The Microsoft-user of coffee would walk into a McDonalds and say, "I'd like a coffee, thanks".

Welcome to my everlasting database of quotes. :-)

--
Yavista - if you haven't found a nice homepage yet.

[ Parent ]

Woohoo! (none / 0) (#5)
by inspire on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 02:29:45 AM EST

Welcome to my everlasting database of quotes. :-)

*sniff*

I'd like to thank the Academy...
--
What is the helix?
[ Parent ]

dot-com (3.00 / 1) (#8)
by enterfornone on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 04:50:15 AM EST

i work for a dot-com and all we get is instant coffee and a vendoing machine full of free coke and pepsi, the bastards!

--
efn 26/m/syd
Will sponsor new accounts for porn.
[ Parent ]
Re: dot-com (none / 0) (#14)
by guppie on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 08:12:16 AM EST

When we were just 6 people in my dot-com, I bought all the coffee from a wonderful grind-your-own cooffe place and brewed it on my desk.

Now we're 35, and we have two public coffe machines with generic, cheap-o coffee, bitter and burnt-tasting. No designer coffee in sight! I think I'll have to brew my own coffe again, in secrecy, so that the greedy masses won't get hold of it ;-).


What? The land of the free? Whoever told you that is your enemy.
-Zack de la Rocha
[ Parent ]
I've checked into this.... (none / 0) (#42)
by minusp on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 12:06:15 PM EST

For as little as 12K$US you can get a portable coffee roaster, just get your source of green beans and REALLY roll your own!!
Remember, regime change begins at home.
[ Parent ]
Bastards, the lot of you! (none / 0) (#16)
by inspire on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 08:34:46 AM EST

Here at uni I get the choice of paying $1.10 for McDonalds coffee, or upwards of $5 for coffee from Brunetti's (which I maintain make the best coffee this side of the Yarra).

The law of coffee economics states for amount of caffeine/buck the cheap coffee is the way to go.

During this week it's been exam period in Australia, and I've taken to bringing two sachets of instant coffee with me to the exam venue. Just munching the coffee raw wakes you up enough to focus you on the exam. You learn to ignore the initial gag reflex after a few sachets...

Damnit, I hate being a student :)
--
What is the helix?
[ Parent ]

An alternative. (2.50 / 2) (#2)
by inspire on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 02:12:03 AM EST

Your basic 'instant latte' is made by adding the coffee (2 teaspoonfuls) to just enough water to dissolve it, and then filling the cup up with milk.

Add sugar to taste.
--
What is the helix?

Caffeine Crystals != Coffee (none / 0) (#25)
by weathervane on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 01:41:54 PM EST

Auhhmmmm, that stuff that dissolves in water isn't really coffee. At least, not in my books.

As per Douglas Adams, I prefer to think of them as "a substance used to create a caffeinated beverage that is mostly, but not entirely, unlike coffee". Or caffeine crystals for short.

[ Parent ]

ha.. (none / 0) (#28)
by DeadBaby on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 05:31:25 PM EST

Come now... You've never had to stay up late working on something and took a few spoofuls? It might not be coffee but enough of it has the same effect.
"Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us." - Carl Sagan
[ Parent ]
When you need the juice... (none / 0) (#30)
by weathervane on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 06:51:38 PM EST

Well, I have to admit to being a bit of a coffee snob. But, hey, when you need the juice you need the juice.

There's actually some decent instant coffee in the world. My mom brought some stuff back from Jamaica called Grace that was pretty decent. But mostly I only go for the good stuff.

[ Parent ]

black (3.25 / 4) (#6)
by hurstdog on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 02:41:08 AM EST

its the programmer's coffee ;-) quick. easy. efficient. no time wasted stirring and mixing. when you need caffeine why waste time with all the extra hub-ub? just pour, drink, and ahhhh.... Its like Larry Wall said:

@a=(Lbzjoftt,Inqbujfodf,
Hvcsjt); $b="Lbssz Wbmm"
;$b =~ y/b-z/a-z/ ; $c =
" Tif ". @a ." hsfbu wj"
."suvft pg b qsphsbnnfs"
. ":\n";$c =~y/b-y/a-z/;
print"\n\n$c ";for($i=0;
$i<@a; $i++) { $a[$i] =~
y/b-y/a-z/;if($a[$i]eq$a
[-1]){print"and $a[$i]."
;}else{ print"$a[$i], ";
}}print"\n\t\t--$b\n\n";



I agree... (3.00 / 1) (#44)
by teeheehee on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 02:02:48 PM EST

Black as Night and Hot as Hell. Call me a leathernecker but I also like my toast burnt and I hate to wear gloves except in the utmost intolerably cold weather - of which I have seldom seen since moving to the Boston area from my northern New York homeland (read: Canada, NOT New York City you crazy, geography-ignorant buffoons!) where winters were Winters and Coffee is quaffed until the shakes subside!

Ahhhh, and even though it's a great stimulant I find I can still go to sleep at any length of time after slurping down any amount. If only I could import some healthy Adirondack air and clear the skies so that I can see the stars at night while I sip my Godly Brew - that would be WONDERFUL!

(Discordia) :: Hail Eris!
Everything you've just read was poetry and art - no infringement!

[ Parent ]
try: drink(coffee) except bitterness: drink(tea) (3.33 / 3) (#7)
by cysgod on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 04:02:11 AM EST

On those days I can't stand the bitterness of coffee (which is most days any more) I brew up a nice pot of tea instead. I mean sure, I live in Seattle, but some coffee shops serve really burnt tasting coffee. Say nothing for the charcoal-tasting espresso served by the cafe run by my employer.

Making tea is incredibly easy. Hot water can be derived from many many sources. I use a well cleaned old coffee maker generally. No filter or anything, just let it boil the hot water straight out into the pot which has a couple teabags in it. You, of course, are the one in control of how strong you tea is, and you don't have to buy an expensive piece of Italian hydraulic technology to make it.

Tea is available for online ordering from a few vendors, or better yet you can go to the local market and get something nice and fresh.

I recommend Market Spice tea, available at Pike Place Market in Seattle and some local retailers. I also got some great tea in Bellingham, WA once named "Himilayan Strawberry" from a small tea and pottery shop in Fairhaven. For those who want to be a bit more upscale, you can always go for a proper English tea, the local favorite in these parts is the Empress Hotel in Victoria, BC. I'm sure whereever on this planet you are, there are local favorites near you too, feel free to share so we know where to go when in your neck of the woods.

Iced, hot or otherwise, tea is easily made, and hard to make poorly without trying hard. Best of all the cost for a cup of tea is much less than the price of espresso or coffee as long as you don't care to be exotic, or are willing to brave the local market.

And I take two lumps of sugar with my tea and no cream. Thanks for asking...

And no, if it comes in an aluminum can, it is not tea. Brisk or not, it just so much more sugared juice.

Good Inexpensive Tea (3.00 / 1) (#17)
by JB on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 09:44:42 AM EST

I prefer coffee, but do drink tea for some variety and the health benefits. At Asian food stores, the good brands of green tea (like Dynasty or Yamamotoyama) cost about half of what they do in grocery stores or mail order.

[ Parent ]
health benefits (none / 0) (#23)
by el_guapo on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 12:47:08 PM EST

NOT for all :-( (that would be ME) i absolutly LOVE tea, but it contains oxylates (as does coffee), and if you're prone to kidney stones (i am), well, it makes you have even MORE kidney stones....when I solely drink water (with lemon or lime), i get like 3 a year; a while back i said "screw it" avoiding tea ain't helping, and went back to ~64oz of tea a day. well, i went to about 25/year - OUCH (still waiting for the last batch of _11_ to finish their painful journey). sooooo, sadly for me, no tea :-(
mas cerveza, por favor mirrors, manifestos, etc.
[ Parent ]
Of course, if you had a secretary... (3.00 / 1) (#19)
by inspire on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 10:38:20 AM EST

You could deliver the classic line:

Tea, Earl Grey. Hot.
--
What is the helix?
[ Parent ]

Not to start a flame war... (4.00 / 1) (#31)
by tzanger on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 09:49:26 PM EST

Tea, Earl Grey. Hot.

I WAY prefer TNG over the original series (haven't seen either in years now though) but I think that Kirk had it right:

Beer. Romulan. Cold.

:-)



[ Parent ]
Tea is good (3.00 / 1) (#35)
by Elendale on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 11:19:23 PM EST

I can't stand coffee, but i'm a big tea-freak. I have a personal favorite: <a href="http://www.great-eastern-sun.com">organic haiku sencha green tea. This is some of the most expensive tea i've ever seen (breaking $5 for a 24 bag box locally) but is still cheaper than almost all coffee. Mind you, get black tea if you really need to stay awake :)

-Elendale
---

When free speech is outlawed, only criminals will complain.


[ Parent ]
no-doze (3.00 / 2) (#9)
by enterfornone on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 05:19:11 AM EST

When working nights my fave was no-doze washed down with a borocca disolved in coke. Yum!

--
efn 26/m/syd
Will sponsor new accounts for porn.
Re: no-doze (none / 0) (#13)
by dreamfish on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 06:49:42 AM EST

Berocca in coke? Berocca fizzes up more than enough in plain water - in coke it's likely to explode!

What do I think of coffee? Not a lot, I'm allergic to it (no, really).

[ Parent ]

no-doze (1.20 / 5) (#10)
by enterfornone on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 05:28:05 AM EST

When working nights my fave was no-doze washed down with a borocca disolved in coke. Yum!

--
efn 26/m/syd
Will sponsor new accounts for porn.
Irish Coffee (3.66 / 3) (#15)
by Macallan on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 08:21:03 AM EST

Not quite for work but afterwards I prefer Irish Coffee - of just add 1-4cl of some cheap but good irish whiskey - like Paddy - which takes away most of the coffee's bitterness and adds some of that rich taste that most irish whiskeys have... the cream on top is optional, it just stops the alcohol from evaporating :-)
eat your enemies !
Baileys Irish Cream (none / 0) (#26)
by itsbruce on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 02:49:37 PM EST

Added to a coffee - great drink for a cold night.

--

It is impolite to tell a man who is carrying you on his shoulders that his head smells.
[ Parent ]
Re: Baileys Irish Cream (none / 0) (#39)
by Morn on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 06:09:47 AM EST

Just don't make a 'normal' milky instant coffee using Baileys instead of milk - it's a little overpowering... (tastes less like coffee and more like a mug of warm Baileys).

[ Parent ]
Irish coffee variants (none / 0) (#37)
by Merekat on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 05:29:15 AM EST

One of the tricks to making an Irish Coffee is to use unwhipped (pouring cream) and still get it to float as opposed to mix in with the coffee. To get that effect, make sure you put sugar in the coffee and carefully pour the cream over the back of a slightly heated spoon which isn't quite touching the surface of the coffee. I don't think it really makes much of a flavour difference, but it means you can claim to be an Irish Coffee geek.

If you don't like the burn of whiskey, other good things to try are:

  • Kaluha/Tia Maria
  • Dark rum
  • Brandy

Now for the really evil one: Get some nice vanilla icecream, pull an espresso (or make evil thickish instant if you have to), and get your dark spirit of choice. Put the lot into a blender and blitz until you have the best adult milkshake in the world:) Substitute a chocolate ice cream for the mocha version.
---
I've always had the greatest respect for other peoples crack-pot beliefs.
- Sam the Eagle, The Muppet Show
[ Parent ]

Irish-Italian coffee (none / 0) (#50)
by kmself on Tue Nov 14, 2000 at 12:07:10 AM EST

See my post above for espresso, add two shots of whiskey and a half-jigger of half-and-half. Jack Daniels for kick, Jamieson's for a slightly smoother nip.

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.
[ Parent ]

Straight from the bean (3.25 / 4) (#18)
by itsbruce on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 10:30:01 AM EST

If you don't like the taste of coffee (odd, but I suppose it happens), don't drink it, sniff it. Simple procedure: grind some fresh beans, hold tray of fresh grounds under nose, sniff. Instant caffiene rush, direct to the brain by the shortest route.

Note for the daft: don't snort the coffee, just sniff it.

Course, I always go on and make a pot with the grounds but you don't have to.

--

It is impolite to tell a man who is carrying you on his shoulders that his head smells.
Uhmmmm, question? (none / 0) (#21)
by greydmiyu on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 12:03:52 PM EST

Is it just me, or if someone doesn't like the taste of coffee isn't it also safe to assume they'll not like the smell either since taste is, in large part, influenced by smell?

I don't like the taste of coffee and the smell is downright nauseating.

-- Grey d'Miyu, not just another pretty color.
[ Parent ]
Answer (4.00 / 1) (#22)
by blp on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 12:31:39 PM EST

I think the part of the taste of coffee most people don't like is the bitterness and you can't smell that.

I can no longer sit back and allow: Communist Infiltration, Communist Indoctrination, Communist Subversion and the International Communist Conspiracy to sap and inpurify all of our precious bodily fluids.
[ Parent ]

The tastes and smells of coffee (none / 0) (#46)
by BlaisePascal on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 04:03:01 PM EST

I'm not a big coffee drinker (maybe a dozen cups a year), but I've often said that if coffee tasted the way it smells, I'd drink lots of it.

For some reason, I tend to find espresso (served without sugar) to taste the closest to the smell of coffee. So when I drink coffee, I'll go for espresso. I do tend to find Starbuck's to be overroasted and bitter, though.

The -best- way I've found to get the taste of the smell of coffee is to eat whole roasted beans (chocolate covered, preferrably). For caffeine, it's a good source as well. The only time I can remember having a really strong caffeine buzz was after getting out of a test and realizing that the only thing I'd eaten that day was about a cup of chocolate covered espresso beans and 40oz of Coke-a-cola.

[ Parent ]

Tim Hortons (2.50 / 2) (#20)
by k5er on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 11:47:17 AM EST

Tim Hortons has the best coffee ever. Here in Canada it is generally accepted as the best and few will argue that. Do you guys have Tim's in the states?
Long live k5, down with CNN.
Allow me to disagree (none / 0) (#24)
by weathervane on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 01:36:20 PM EST

It's not so bad, but basically it's the Starbucks of Canada, except that you only have one choice of coffee. The coffee is universally overroasted and bitter (just like starbucks). The coffee cake is pretty good though. And their cappucino's and that sort of thing stink - they don't even have lattes.

It's ok in a small town, but trust me, it's not especially good coffee. Go to a specialty shop and try some good medium roast african coffee. Use a little more coffee that you usually would. Add a little cream and sugar and -- ahhhh heaven. Indonesian coffee is good too, but I don't really like the idea of platation overseers beating worker's kidneys until they pee blood.

[ Parent ]

Starbucks (none / 0) (#47)
by superfly on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 04:10:48 PM EST

Starbucks is the Starbucks of Canada, at least here in Vancouver, where there is a sad shortage of Tim Hortons. I don't drink coffee much, but sometimes I have a craving for doughnuts, and can't find any.



[ Parent ]
Sweet Tea! (4.00 / 3) (#27)
by LordEq on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 03:46:23 PM EST

I like coffee, too, but the Southerner in me couldn't live without sweet tea. Any restaurant that doesn't serve it is uncivilized.

Here is one way to make a pitcher of sweet tea. There are many others. This one is mine.

Measurements are given in "old money". For hardcore metric people, a quart and a liter are close enough that it doesn't make much difference. Sweet tea is an art, not a science.

Put 1 to 1.5 qt of water in a pot or kettle. Boil it.

If you use a separate teapot, put two $YOUR-FAVORITE-BRAND "family-size, flow-through" tea bags in it, and pour the boiling water over them. If you are using an ordinary cooking pot/boiler/saucepan/whatever, remove it from the heat and put the tea bags into the water.

If you prefer, throw in a pinch of baking soda. This neutralizes some of the acids present in the tea, making it smoother, with less of a "bite". It also makes it darker. Some like it, some don't. Totally optional.

Cover, and let the tea bags steep for a long while. I usually leave it at least 30 minutes. It's okay if you forget about it (I've even left some overnight), but the sugar dissolves better if the tea is still warm. Remove the tea bags, press them (two spoons work nicely for this), and discard.

Put 1.5 cups of sugar into a 1-gallon pitcher. Pour the tea over the sugar, and stir until the sugar is dissolved. Fill the pitcher with water. Stir again.

Refrigerate.


--LordEq

"That's what K5's about. Hippies and narcs cavorting together." --panck
Sweet tea goodness (none / 0) (#33)
by chuq_r on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 10:42:54 PM EST

Thank you, thank you, thank you! As a semi-Seattlite I can find pretty decent coffee (and loads of really crappy coffee, unfortunately) and the fine folks who make Penguin Mints are just a hop, skip, and jump away, but ever since my short visits to Alabama I have not been able to shake the desires for both Waffle House food (no, I'm not concerned about my health in this point) and sweet tea. Sadly, the nearest Waffle House is in Colorado and that's just too far to drive. I've also been unable to find any place around here that serves real, honest to goodness sweet tea.

Finally having a recipe to make sweet tea myself makes things so much simpler. No one around here seems to have a clue about these things, and even though my roommate comes from Oklahoma, he doesn't know jack about food or drink. Now if I could just find a good barbecue place...

Chuq

[ Parent ]

Sweet tea goodness (none / 0) (#34)
by chuq_r on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 10:58:18 PM EST

Thank you, thank you, thank you! As a semi-Seattlite I can find pretty decent coffee (and loads of really crappy coffee, unfortunately) and the fine folks who make Penguin Mints are just a hop, skip, and jump away, but ever since my short visits to Alabama I have not been able to shake the desires for both Waffle House food (no, I'm not concerned about my health in this point) and sweet tea. Sadly, the nearest Waffle House is in Colorado and that's just too far to drive. I've also been unable to find any place around here that serves real, honest to goodness sweet tea.

Finally having a recipe to make sweet tea myself makes things so much simpler. No one around here seems to have a clue about these things, and even though my roommate comes from Oklahoma, he doesn't know jack about food or drink. Now if I could just find a good barbecue place...

Chuq

[ Parent ]

I'm not the only one! (3.50 / 2) (#29)
by fluffy grue on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 05:34:59 PM EST

Thank you, thank you, for proving to me that I'm not the only one who's been begging Rusty for a recipes section!

I have a lot of experimental recipes I want to share with people, as well as various preparation techniques and the like. And I know that I'm not the only geek out there who loves cooking (after all, cooking is just coding without an undo). I've been wanting a recipes section on K5 since long before there were sections - in fact, one of the very first things I suggested to Rusty involved having a recipes section. (It was as part of a longer treatise on having the community decide the section by voting on a section it should go into, including a trashcan, rather than voting +1, 0 or -1, this being before sections existed.)

So Rusty, are you ever going to listen to me? :)
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]

Cooking and Coding (none / 0) (#38)
by Morn on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 06:06:03 AM EST

after all, cooking is just coding without an undo

Ah, but when you're cooking it takes much longer if you want to compile it just to find errors (because you're too lazy to look for them by hand).

[ Parent ]

Column? (none / 0) (#41)
by Merekat on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 11:25:18 AM EST

Hmm... if the foodies can't have a section, how about a regular column? I like to recipe swap too.
---
I've always had the greatest respect for other peoples crack-pot beliefs.
- Sam the Eagle, The Muppet Show
[ Parent ]
Alternative stimulants (3.50 / 2) (#32)
by Ludwig on Sun Nov 05, 2000 at 10:35:45 PM EST

My problem with large amounts of caffeine, especially in a hot beverage, is that it tends to have unpleasant side-effects. It doesn't happen with coffee after dinner, but it does happen with coffee + large breakfast, so I'm not sure what the deciding factor is. In any case, I've found those liquid vials of ginseng extract (not Siberian, but the other kind) to be an excellent pick-me-up, and without all the caffeine problems (sweats, jitters, shits, bad taste in your mouth.) Ma Huang, aka Ephedra, also seems to work well, although I haven't tried it as extensively. Supposedly it acts as a broncho- and vaso-dilator similar to pseudoephedrine and ephedrine, getting more oxygen to your brain. Of course, methampetamine (in very small doses) is still the most efficient and useful stimulant, but it's illegal and eventually makes your teeth fall out. And who ever managed to confine themselves to very small doses?

Herbal stuff. (none / 0) (#40)
by Alarmist on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 10:47:43 AM EST

Ephedra has the same basic mechanisms of action as ephedrine because ephedrine is synthesized from ephedra. <grin>

Ever had ephedra tea? Don't. Never, never try to drink it straight. Instead, if you absolutely must, blend it with something else. Or put a lot of something in there to deal with it, unless you don't mind grassy tastes.

The idea is that ephedra/ephedrine is, as you said a vaso-/bronchodialator. Among other things, it increases pulse and blood pressure. The extra oxygen you get from your lungs is pushed into your system that much faster, so what you're basically flying on is an oxygen rush. It tends to make you hyper and jittery. The problem with ephedrine is that it's also a diuretic agent. That, in combination with the hyper state it induces, can cause dehydration very quickly.

They stopped putting ephedrine in cold and sinus medicines some time ago; now they use pseudoephedrine, which has the diuretic effects but doesn't make you as jittery or hyper. The bronchodialation is handy for getting you more air, and the diuretic properties dry out excess mucus. I suspect that at least a little of the rotten feeling you get when your sinuses have gone haywire or you have some sort of respiratory illness is because you're not getting enough oxygen.

There's been talk from time to time of making ephedrine and pseudoephedrine illegal; evidently, some people have been dissatisfied with their performance and are synthesizing methamphetamines from them. Hmm.

Fight the Power.


[ Parent ]

Turkish Coffee1!!!!!!!!!!! :) Schweeet. (4.00 / 3) (#36)
by Robby on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 12:00:59 AM EST

guaranteed to give you heart trouble

Ok, this is not for the faint hearted. Ingredients:

  • very finely ground, dark roasted beans.
  • Sugar if you want it.
  • a small tub, (look for an 'ibrik' if you're buying) with a top opening thats smaller than the body (i.e. it looks like a trapezoid)
  • water, duh.
Ok, you've got all that? Get your ibrik, put some cold water into it (it's crapper if it's hot) - amd then, on top of that, dump some coffee on top of it so it's ~1.5 cm thick (i'm metric, OK?) - Don't mix it in - leave it on top of the water. Also, add sugar to taste NOW - not after!. now start boiling it - when the water starts boiling, skim the very top bit off it (the 'cream' of the coffee) and put it back toboil some more - do this until you get bored or 3 times, whichever comes first, and then carefully pour it into your little cup (you should really not have much more than an espresso cup going here, people) And thats it - your heart attack ina cup :) Cheers, it's got me through many a sleepeless exam night.

ya mahn! (3.00 / 1) (#48)
by tmckain on Tue Nov 07, 2000 at 01:05:44 AM EST

turkish coffee just rocks! that's all I need to say about that! excepting the fact that a decent cup of it is not that easy to come by.

[ Parent ]
Another Alternative... (3.00 / 2) (#43)
by minusp on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 12:08:41 PM EST

...from a truck driver friend. Vitamin B12. That's all. Awake and aware without the buzz or non-productive urination.
Remember, regime change begins at home.
Cafe Correcto (3.00 / 1) (#45)
by greyrat on Mon Nov 06, 2000 at 02:04:43 PM EST

My preferred method is a double espresso cut with about an equal amount of hot water (ala Cafe American) to which an equal amount of Sambuca or Amaretto is added.

Mmmmmmmm...Thump!
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Brewing the Perfect Cup of Coffee (4.00 / 2) (#49)
by kmself on Mon Nov 13, 2000 at 12:21:55 AM EST

  1. Beans. Graffeo Coffee, 735 Columbus St., San Francisco, CA, USA, ((415) 986-2420 ) is the preferred source. Simply the world's finest coffee. They will ship, but not internationally. A good friend is a helpful substitute. Barring that, mountain-grown Columbian beans, dark roast, from a good source, may be attempted. Under no circumstances should French roast or any lesser bean be substituted.

  2. Storage. Most food products oxidize. Storing your whole beans in an airtight container is a Good Thing ™. I've got an acrylic snap-top jar -- it works, and doesn't break when I drop it. I don't recommend freezing whole beans -- they tend to gum up in a typical household grinder.

  3. Grind. There's a tradeoff between a good grind and a fresh grind. A good grind is what you'll get from a professional coffee grinder, which gets the right grain size. However, ground coffee ages more rapidly (exposed air surface) than whole beans. 20 - 25 seconds in a standard Krups "propeller" mill is usually acceptable. I've even been known to freeze the excess overnight.

  4. Water. Wet is generally good. High levels of impurities may be noticeable. I filter all my tap water, and use filtered tap water for coffee. Buying imported water for making coffee is excessive. It may impress some people, but it probably doesn't do much for the brew.

  5. Equipment. Forget about the Italian-style espresso machines. The really good ones cost upwards of $1000 (US), and your kitchen is too small anyway. The smaller household jobs just don't cut the mustard. An espresso maker needs to be kept on, is very finiky, and is not just a water heater. Fortunately, the <strike>cheap</strike> inexpensive ($12 - $20 US) "vespa" (wasp-waist) three-piece Italian alluminum stovetop espresso pot is one of the best ways to make brew in existence.

    The vespa has three parts -- a bottom chamber, filled with water; a funnel, filled with grounds; and a top chamber, where the brew comes out. It works by steam pressure -- as water heats, it's forced down in the bottom chamber, up through the funnel, and into the top. A perforated filter and gasket sit in the bottom of the top chamber. More on this later.

  6. Putting it all together.
    • Fill the bottom chamber of your vespa espresso maker with water to the fill line (ridge on the inside), or just below the steam release valve (the bolt visible from the outside).
    • Place the funnel in the base and add grounds to your taste to the funnel cup. I cheat and use a 6-shot maker to brew a single large mug of espresso. Most people will like the quantity but prefer a weaker brew -- half or two-thirds a load of grounds may work.
    • Assemble the unit, screwing the top on securely. You'll probably have to work to get it apart again afterwards.

  7. Doing the deed. Gas or electric stove is fine, but place the bakealite handle away from direct heat -- it will melt, and usually does over time. Moderate (gas) or high (electric) heat. Brewing takes about five minutes, the pot will spit as it's nearly done. You can turn gas down or electric off at this point. Remember the gasket? Leaving the pot on heat too long will burn the grounds and melt the gasket. This is a Bad Thing ™. You may get a whistling out of the pressure release valve, especially with high heat on finely-ground beans.

  8. Serve. Six shots, or one large mug ;-)

  9. Cleanup and maintenance. Let the pot cool. I usually flush and fill the top chamber with cold water a couple of times. When cooled, dissassemble (it may be tight). Dump grounds, rinse, suds are OK but not necessary.

    If you do manage to leave the pot on too long, you can get rid of the bad smell by soaking all parts in a strong, hot baking-soda solution for 20-30 minutes. The gasket usually softens over time, though a long stretch on the stove will melt it pretty convincingly. Replacement filters and gaskets are available at kitchen and coffee shops. Sizing can vary, bring the filter to check fit.


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