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[P]
Schrodinger's Santa, An Alternate Theory

By SnowBlind in Culture
Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 11:34:37 AM EST
Tags: Humour (all tags)
Humour

A quantum theory explaining Santa's ability to deliver a bignum of packages.


The age-old question of how Santa delivers so many packages to every good boy and girl is difficult to explain in face of the excellent work done by Patty Miranda of the University of San Francisco. Her assumption that Santa follows Newton's view of the Universe is somewhat out dated. However, standing on the shoulders of intellectual giant's such as Boer, Einstein and of course Schrodinger, Santa is capable of using quantum physics to simultaneously deliver packages to every good boy or girl.

Schrodinger's famous thought experiment postulated that the dead or alive state of a cat in a box couldn't be determined without observing the cat, which, by virtue of a booby trap, is now dead. Santa uses this same principle to be in every house at the same time.

Let me explain Santa cannot be proven to be in any given house at any given time delivering packages. To be sure, the effect of Santa being in any given house on Christmas Eve can easily be determined by the effect of his visit, to wit, the delivery of presents. But if one tries to observe Santa actually delivering said packages by staying up all night would in fact, never see Santa delivering the packages. I can attest to this from my experience at 8 years of age. A tricky one this Santa. In fact, one may infer that Santa may only appear if he is NOT being observed at the time of delivering the packages.

This still leaves the supposed sighting of Santa delivering packages as reported by many children every year. It not inconsistent with this theory, and can be simply explained as the children are actually being naughty by trying to observe Santa, and as such, he could not have delivered packages. They are furthering their naughtiness by lying about the whole thing. NORAD as well reports sighting Santa and his sleigh on radar, as well as making contact via interceptors for visual verification. This is quite clearly a decoy used to draw attention away from the real Santa, thus allowing quantum physics to be employed. Merry Christamas!

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Poll
How does Santa Work?
o Devine intervention 8%
o Quantum physics 20%
o Newtonian physics 2%
o Transporter 4%
o "Particle of the week" physics 26%
o The One Ring 36%
o Other 4%

Votes: 50
Results | Other Polls

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Schrodinger's Santa, An Alternate Theory | 41 comments (37 topical, 4 editorial, 0 hidden)
Bah Humbug (4.50 / 8) (#5)
by localroger on Fri Dec 21, 2001 at 07:14:21 PM EST

I'm 38 years old and I still remember quite vividly the day I was told the awful truth about Santa Claus. Having been quick-witted even in those tender years I seem to recall asking shakily if this meant that the Easter Bunny too... and the Tooth Fairy... you mean ALL of them?

It's only funny if you aren't the one who has just realized the whole world has been lying to you for your entire life, and laughing about your gullibility.

I have never been able to figure out why people think it's cute to spin out elaborate lies and watch children demonstrate their youth and inexperience by swallowing them whole.

Maybe it's because the typical person is so downtrodden and disillusioned with life that the inevitable disillusionment of the lied-to child seems like a just and valid "lesson" which will come along sooner or later anyway, and might as well be arranged artistically.

Maybe it's because we're so afraid of the next generation's strength that we want to get our licks in while we have a chance.

Maybe it's just that humans really are cruel at heart and the shattering of little dreams really is funny. After all, our ancestors thought cat-baiting was a fine and jolly sport and didn't hesitate to make a picnic holiday out of a hanging or wheeling.

Yeah, that makes sense. After all, it also explains the ascendancy of America's Funniest Utterly Humiliating Home Videos and all those police reality shows where we get to see Other People (tm) getting busted for doing dumb shit we would never be dumb enough to do... right?

P.S. Not voting up or down, as the theory really is cute if you don't find the whole conceptual background nauseating.

I can haz blog!

Topical/editorial... (none / 0) (#8)
by seebs on Fri Dec 21, 2001 at 08:00:25 PM EST

I voted the story up +1 because of this comment. A very interesting point. I don't remember whether I ever believed in Santa, or any of the others, or even whether my parents told me that. If the story's still around after my mom gets home from work, I'll followup with my version of the story.

I do basically agree - not a cool game to play.


[ Parent ]
Another theory (4.60 / 5) (#12)
by rusty on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 01:34:03 AM EST

How about this theory: We tell these things to children because we know they'll believe them. And through them, for a little while, we can believe them again too. What Santa Claus (or your magic being of choice: The Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy, God, etc.) does is instills a little kernel of belief in a kid that there's magic in the world. That there are things that are outside normal experience, and just can't be explained. I don't believe in a fat guy in a red suit, or an old man with a long white beard looking down from the clouds, but I do believe that people can make magic happen if they want to, because my parents did it when I was a kid.

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
My non-traumatic Santa story ... (none / 0) (#26)
by joegee on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 09:48:28 PM EST

Christmas morning, I was four. It seems like I could never get to sleep Christmas Eve. I woke up at 5 AM.

I ran downstairs. My dad had woken up early and was in the family room putting together presents. He heard me coming. He turned off the lights.

I got down to the bottom of the steps, and the family room was dark except for a moving shape that said "HO HO HO."

I burst into tears and ran back upstairs to my mom. She asked me why I was crying and I told her that I had just scared Santa away while he was putting presents under our tree so we weren't going to get any this year and it was all my fault.

I don't remember being traumatized when I learned that Santa wasn't real. I haven't spent my life in therapy since then. I have been thankful that I had the gift of a short time, 1/7th of my life now, where magic really could happen. I know it hasn't happened that way for everyone, and I'm really sorry it doesn't, but if I can help bring a little magic into the life of a little one you can count me in as a conspirator for as long as they want to believe.

By the way, the next year in kindergarten I pulled the beard off of Santa and said "you're not Santa." I traumatized twenty-five other kids. Amy, Eric, Steve, Trent, Renee, Lisa, George, and the rest of you: wherever you are, I'm sorry. :)

<sig>I always learn something on K5, sometimes in spite of myself.</sig>
[ Parent ]
This is called "living vicariously." (4.00 / 1) (#31)
by localroger on Sun Dec 23, 2001 at 02:17:07 PM EST

To continue my Scroogey streak, excuse me while I get my insulin level checked. There is indeed magic in the world. The ability to examine a rock and determine that it contains 3.5 billion year old fossil life forms is magical. The ability to send men to the Moon and walk upon it is magical. The ability to cure diseases and plumb the depths of outer space is magical. The ability to build tall buildings and giant ocean liners and other magnificent artifacts is magical.

Next to all of this, the fable about the guy in the red suit is only a little more ridiculous than the one about the world being created in 4004 B.C.

Like all human activities the maintenance of the Santa myth has a good side and a bad side. The "good" side gets all the press. Frankly I am no fan of Norman Rockwell paintings, Strawberry Shortcake illustrations, or New Agey unicorns. There are plenty of actual mysteries and actual awe-inspiring truths out there, and I find the ones we make up because we can't understand or don't like the real ones rather flat by comparison.

The bottom line is that the whole Santa thing is a monstrous practical joke in which the whole world cooperates. No matter how "non-traumatically" you received (or worked out) the truth, the actual lesson you learned is that the whole world is willing and able to sustain a ridiculous fraud just to see the look on your face as you swallow it whole. I don't find "innocence" cute. Innocence is a tragic lack of experience which needs to be corrected, not maintained out of some weird nostalgic trip.

Then again, the more serious people think we're celebrating the birthday of Jeshua ben Miriam of Nazareth about this time of year, even though we're really celebrating the Winter Solstice and Jesus was probably born in the fall, a jiggle which was introduced into the Christian calendar to make the Christianization of certain Pagan tribes a little easier. So the practice of lying about things at this time of year is an ancient one, for whatever reason.

I can haz blog!
[ Parent ]

Bitter bastard (none / 0) (#33)
by rusty on Mon Dec 24, 2001 at 12:41:49 PM EST

No, my comment didn't have anything to do with saccharine innocence. It had to do with the feeling I had when I woke up Christmas morning and the stockings were full and all the presents were down in the family room. It made me happy. I have no problem with parents making their kids happy, no matter what ideological quandries it may cause.

"Mostrous practical joke" indeed. When people start killing each other because of Santa Claus, then I'll join up with you and call it monstrous. Until then, I'll keep reserving that word for religions and serial killers.

There is indeed magic in the world. The ability to examine a rock and determine that it contains 3.5 billion year old fossil life forms is magical. The ability to send men to the Moon and walk upon it is magical. The ability to cure diseases and plumb the depths of outer space is magical. The ability to build tall buildings and giant ocean liners and other magnificent artifacts is magical.

Absolutely, and exactly my point. People can create magic. The magic we create for little kids is really simple and dumb, but it's just an example. It's practice magic, to help them recognize it later on.

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]

Touchy Touchy (none / 0) (#34)
by localroger on Wed Dec 26, 2001 at 05:07:09 PM EST

No, my comment didn't have anything to do with saccharine innocence. It had to do with the feeling I had when I woke up Christmas morning and the stockings were full and all the presents were down in the family room. It made me happy.

My question is, did the myth about the guy in the red suit and the reindeer actually enhance this feeling? Was it really necessary?

"Mostrous practical joke" indeed. When people start killing each other because of Santa Claus, then I'll join up with you and call it monstrous.

Touche; I did not in any way meant to equate the practice of Santa Sniping with, say, the events of this past September. Then again I don't think anyone would call the bombing of the WTC a "practical joke," which is certainly what the Santa myth is, either.

The universality and pervasiveness of the sham can be awe-inspiring to a kid, who finds everyone he has ever trusted has spent his entire life making him look like a fool. Yeah, many kids don't react like this. After all, they get to be the jokesters next year. But I'm not put together that way and I've always felt it was a creepy thing to do.

People can create magic. The magic we create for little kids is really simple and dumb, but it's just an example.

Lies are not magic, no matter how sweet.

Incidentally, bare hours after writing that post I grinned and went along with the Santa sham for the parents of a 9yo nephew I met for the first time at the family get-together this Xmas. So don't take my objection too seriously. As I said before, the positive side gets all the press. The negative side deserves to be considered seriously, that's all I ask.

I can haz blog!
[ Parent ]

Er, also (none / 0) (#35)
by rusty on Thu Dec 27, 2001 at 12:30:54 AM EST

The topic line and content of my last comment really needed to be sprinkled liberally with ";-)". It came off sounding way, way more serious then I meant it. What can I say, I was tired and my pitch was off. Sorry.

;-)

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]

Santa, Satan, Invisible pink unicorns (none / 0) (#16)
by I am Jack's username on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 04:04:25 AM EST

My parents didn't do the Santa or easter bunny thing - and I don't spoil it for kids unless they ask me straight out whether it's true or not. I feel that parents should be allowed to lie to their kids if they want to, yet I'll emphasize empiricism, logic and reason as the best ways to figure out models and truths when talking to them.

I was pretty pissed off when I finally figured out that Christianity (and most codified theist beliefs) was a collection of logical fallicies, wrapped in flat out lies, evangelized by morons. The thing is that most of my family members deeply believe in it, and didn't regard it as feeding me excrement, so they didn't consciously lie to me the way Santa parents do.
--
Inoshiro for president!
"War does not determine who is right - only who is left." - Bertrand Russell
[ Parent ]

Invisible pink unicorns? (none / 0) (#36)
by davidduncanscott on Sun Dec 30, 2001 at 02:11:38 PM EST

Strictly speaking, shouldn't it be one or the other?

[ Parent ]
Invisible and pink (none / 0) (#37)
by I am Jack's username on Sun Dec 30, 2001 at 04:18:34 PM EST

"The Invisible Pink Unicorns is a being of great spiritual power. We know this because she is capable of being invisible and pink at the same time. Like all religions, the Faith of the Invisible Pink Unicorn is based upon both logic and faith. We have faith that she is pink; we logically know that she is invisible because we can't see her." - http://www.palmyra.demon.co.uk/humour/ipu.htm
--
Inoshiro for president!
"War does not determine who is right - only who is left." - Bertrand Russell
[ Parent ]
Groovy stuff (none / 0) (#38)
by davidduncanscott on Mon Dec 31, 2001 at 02:26:27 AM EST

Glad I asked.

[ Parent ]
Quite (5.00 / 2) (#19)
by onyxruby on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 05:29:01 AM EST

I recently had to resist the temptation to tell large quantities of kids at a recent christmas type event that santa wasn't real. Considering I was outnumbered by several hundred parents to one (me), the odds were not in my favor of things going well. Good point, whose crueler, the person that tells the truth or the person that tells the lie. Personally, I'd say the person that tells the lie. The fun of it all is that these same parents are quick to admonish their children for fibbing.

The moon is covered with the results of astronomical odds.
[ Parent ]

Setting an example (5.00 / 1) (#23)
by I am Jack's username on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 04:23:28 PM EST

I was outnumbered by several hundred parents to one... parents are quick to admonish their children for fibbing

Next time, ask the children (making sure the parents can all hear and comment): "Boys and girls, which is better: telling the truth or lying? Would you want your parents to set an example of being truthful, or of fibbing?"
--
Inoshiro for president!
"War does not determine who is right - only who is left." - Bertrand Russell
[ Parent ]

Dear Mr. Scrooge... (none / 0) (#21)
by SnowBlind on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 09:24:00 AM EST

Try this fun little flash animation showing why The Easter Bunny Sucks.
The Easter Bunny - cuddly holiday icon that he is - gets rooked into supervising children who are playing in the park. Once precocious youngster unleashes a flurry of theological conundrums which test the limits of the lepidorian's humor. Hijinx ensue. - Site Review

Take a deep breath and repeat: It's over now, I can let go. It's over now, I can let go. It's over now, I can let go.

There is but One Kernel, and root is His Prophet.
[ Parent ]
Slanta Claus (none / 0) (#22)
by MicroBerto on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 03:44:08 PM EST

When I was pretty young I quickly caught on to the fact that this "santa claus" guy was in all the malls at the same time taking pictures, and I just lost the faith right from there. I knew it was stupid but still played with it and kinda pretended to believe.

Berto
- GAIM: MicroBerto
Bertoline - My comic strip
[ Parent ]
Lying to kids (none / 0) (#24)
by Pseudonym on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 07:04:34 PM EST

We all lie to kids. We call it "education".

We lie to kids when we tell them about Newtonian mechanics. We do it when we describe evolution as "survival of the fittest". We do it because it works, and it prepares them for the next stage of learning. After all, if we told them the whole story up front, they'd end up both confused and disinterested.

I don't know why some kids feel lied to or disillusioned when they discover that Santa Claus wasn't real. I have no figures, but it must be a rare phenomenon, otherwise parents wouldn't repeat the story to their own children.

Certainly I didn't feel lied to when I worked it out. I had determined at age 4 that it couldn't be Santa Claus as told in the stories, so I started producing theories as to which other famous people it might really be delivering all those presents. When I finally worked it out, it was more like attaining enlightenment. I remember it like the days that I read the first chapter of "Design Patterns".

Each to their own, I say.



sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f(q{sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f});
[ Parent ]
Parents (none / 0) (#28)
by PresJPolk on Sun Dec 23, 2001 at 03:43:52 AM EST

"It must be rare, or parents wouldn't do it."

Oh, right. Just like how it's shown that teenagers told to abstain get involved in more pregancies than those supplied condoms, therefore parents have stopped being stupid about sex.

[ Parent ]
Huh? (none / 0) (#30)
by Pseudonym on Sun Dec 23, 2001 at 04:35:20 AM EST

I don't understand the connection. My argument is very simple: If someone has a bad experience on discovering that Santa Claus is not real, they are unlikely to do the whole Santa thing with their children. Therefore because so many parents do the Santa thing, having bad experiences on discovering the truth must be rare.

Not that I disagree with you about teenage sex. (Well, I disagree on a small detail. I don't think it's being "told to abstain" so much as not being given accurate or helpful information about sex. Those who push the "just say no" line tend to think that this is an appropriate substitute for sex education, which IMO is the real problem. But I digress.)

BTW, my wife had a bad experience with Santa Claus. After she worked it out (at age five), her parents basicallly forced her to play along until a more appropriate age. Her family was more dysfunctional than mine, though.

Maybe I'm being naive about people. (I've been known to do that.) Maybe most parents don't remember the bad parts of their childhood, like when they worked out the Santa thing, or at least don't reflect on it.

I still can't see what's wrong about Santa Claus. Most kids play make-believe with each other, and eventually work out that their parents play make-believe with them, too. I do respect any parents' decision not to do it, however.



sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f(q{sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f});
[ Parent ]
Cycles of parenting (none / 0) (#39)
by vectro on Tue Jan 01, 2002 at 07:18:44 PM EST

If someone has a bad experience on discovering that Santa Claus is not real, they are unlikely to do the whole Santa thing with their children.
Actually, I would expect the reverse. In cases of child abuse, for example, the abusing parent is very likely to have been abused as a child themselves.

“The problem with that definition is just that it's bullshit.” -- localroger
[ Parent ]
Abuse vs cultural norm (none / 0) (#40)
by Pseudonym on Wed Jan 02, 2002 at 11:51:46 PM EST

Doing the Santa thing is a cultural norm, and thus follows what I'd expect to be "default behaviour". Child abuse, on the other hand, is deviation from the norm.

Therefore I think your analogy isn't a good one. I'd be looking for reasons behind deviation from the norm rather than reasons behind following the norm.



sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f(q{sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f});
[ Parent ]
What's the rule? (none / 0) (#41)
by vectro on Thu Jan 03, 2002 at 11:21:35 PM EST

Now, wait a second. Which is it? Do parents act out their parents' deviations, or their parents' actions which were traumatic?

Obviously, it's both. But post #40 (the parent to this one) claims the former, while post #30 (the great-grandparent to this one) claims the latter.

Personally, I think the latter is the more common, though I also think parents are likely to follow their own parents' parenting behaviour in general.

“The problem with that definition is just that it's bullshit.” -- localroger
[ Parent ]
My own theory ... (4.00 / 1) (#6)
by joegee on Fri Dec 21, 2001 at 07:31:53 PM EST

I suspect that Santa exists in a different universe, and has somehow managed to create a device that allows him to materialize anywhere and anywhen he desires in this universe.

If you have a device like a Tardis that can not only cross through space and time, but dimensions of existance, many things are possible.

Do you know how many megaSantas could fit into one Tardis? I suggest that what we are looking for is NOT this, or this, but this.

<sig>I always learn something on K5, sometimes in spite of myself.</sig>
physics and santa (5.00 / 3) (#7)
by Neuromancer on Fri Dec 21, 2001 at 07:50:53 PM EST

What if we shoot one santa at a screen with 2 holes in it towards multiple (house) targets?

We find out if Santa's a particle or a wave. (nt) (5.00 / 1) (#10)
by joegee on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 12:12:05 AM EST



<sig>I always learn something on K5, sometimes in spite of myself.</sig>
[ Parent ]
No (4.50 / 2) (#11)
by rusty on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 01:28:15 AM EST

No, you'd just find out that Santa is either a particle or a wave, depending on what you're testing for.

It would be fun to find out what the Santa interference pattern looks like, though, wouldn't it?

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]

I suspect it would look kind of like ... (5.00 / 1) (#20)
by joegee on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 07:09:31 AM EST

... a big Rorschach test done in red.

<sig>I always learn something on K5, sometimes in spite of myself.</sig>
[ Parent ]
Ha! (none / 0) (#9)
by rebelcool on Fri Dec 21, 2001 at 10:28:27 PM EST

Fantastic! You should do a more formal write up on it! It'll be a great antidote to that rather depressing paper based on Newton's laws.

COG. Build your own community. Free, easy, powerful. Demo site

Thru Physics (3.00 / 1) (#13)
by EinsteinsProdigy on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 02:44:56 AM EST

there are a few possible scenarios:

The first being that, of course, Santa is able to achieve a velocity near or equal to the speed of light. At the speed of light, naturally, the very essence of time stops and stands still. Thus, relative to Santa, the world has stopped moving and remains stationary: he is able to hit every house on the planet because we are immobile, and the planet is immobile. Relative to an outside observer, you can never see him because he moves much too quickly.This leads us to The Law of Improbability and its association to Absolute Position.

Schroedinger's Theory helps to explain to a degree the association between these two: in that, because atoms move at such great velocities, there is an infinite amount of possible places that an atom can occupy at any given timeframe(a second, a millisecond, a billionth of a second,etc.)and choosing the absolute position of that atom is highly improbable. The atom's position can only be attained by observation, and until then, it is everywhere at all instances of time.

However, physics also states that no body of mass can move at the velocity of light except the mass of light its self. And, considering that Santa is often portrayed as an overweight fellow, this means that the reindeer must exert much more force to try and achieve such a velocity, particularly since he is still within the gravitational pull of the planet.

The theory I suggest is that Santa never actually "flies around the world in one night", but rather has achieved a sort of teleporter mechanism that has allowed him to defeat The Law of Absolute Position and can "zap in and out" of a home in a quick instant, this device of course being able to move mass from one point to the next quick enough that the atoms that compose his mass never have a chance to move from the position they are in when he triggers the device(cause boy if it didn't, Santa would just be one big blob of guts and flesh all over your living room rug come Christmas morning).

Of course we can also theroise that Santa has perfected to an art form the ability to change from mass to energy and from energy to mass(E=mc^2 and M=e/c^2). This has been shown to happen in our universe, whereby mass can just appear from nowhere because of energy produced by cosmic background radiation and vice-versa: mass disappearing and becoming energy. Santa has some shaolin monk-like mind control over his body, that he can accelerate the atoms in his body and cause them to collide and convert him to an energy field, move to his next destination, slow his atoms down and re-appear as a body of mass, deliver his goods and repeat the process.

And, lastly, we could also theorise that Santa has a hellaciously big supply of knock out drops that he puts in the water supplies, we all drink it, go to sleep for weeks on end, and wake up thinking we've only slept for one night.



"Sure, it would be nice if Europeans agreed on a single language, but that's about as likely as Unix users agreeing on a single text editor." -Eloquence
You have it backwards (5.00 / 1) (#14)
by fluffy grue on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 03:30:29 AM EST

When a body approaches c, it's the local time for that body which approaches 0; external time accelerates to ∞. See Flight of the Navigator for a decent discussion of this effect.
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]
[ Parent ]

Thanks (5.00 / 1) (#15)
by qpt on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 04:03:34 AM EST

It is important that we get piddly details like that correct, or Santa might actually be a soul-sucking creation of Coca-Cola, the poster-boy for corporate exploitation.

This year, I will be waiting for Jin Wicked to bring me a present.

Jin Wicked is not stopped by quantum indeterminacy or other such nonsense.

Domine Deus, creator coeli et terrae respice humilitatem nostram.
[ Parent ]

Mmm (5.00 / 1) (#18)
by fluffy grue on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 04:51:48 AM EST

Coke
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]
[ Parent ]

Urban Legend (none / 0) (#32)
by Mwongozi on Sun Dec 23, 2001 at 07:00:05 PM EST

Coke did not invent Santa

[ Parent ]
7 rebuttals to the original (5.00 / 1) (#17)
by I am Jack's username on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 04:34:56 AM EST

http://h ome.uchicago.edu/~rascalzo/arch/palace/library/humor-tech/santa-physics.html
--
Inoshiro for president!
"War does not determine who is right - only who is left." - Bertrand Russell
Thanks To my Fellow Readers! (none / 0) (#25)
by SnowBlind on Sat Dec 22, 2001 at 08:49:24 PM EST

All I Wanted for Christmas Was a Front Page Post! (on Kuro5hin.org)

Come on everyone sing along!
Ok Ok, so at least fake it.


There is but One Kernel, and root is His Prophet.
Dear editor (none / 0) (#27)
by SnowBlind on Sun Dec 23, 2001 at 12:14:30 AM EST

I'm not sure if this is automatic, as this is the only site it is published, but I consider this as GPL copyrighted, Russell (Rustolum) G. Conner 2002. Please add GPL copyright to post if possible/necessary.


There is but One Kernel, and root is His Prophet.
GNU License (none / 0) (#29)
by PresJPolk on Sun Dec 23, 2001 at 03:48:32 AM EST

Setting aside the copyright vs license confusion here,

Why not use the GNU FDL rather than the GNU GPL? The GNU GPL applied to non-software is tricky, but the GNU FDL is clearly applicable to other writeen works.

[ Parent ]
Schrodinger's Santa, An Alternate Theory | 41 comments (37 topical, 4 editorial, 0 hidden)
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