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[P]
Indirection for Modern-Day Personal Communication

By valency in Culture
Thu May 17, 2001 at 11:39:46 PM EST
Tags: Internet (all tags)
Internet

I've been fairly successful in putting a level of indirection between myself and people who need to communicate with me:

  • I give out my ureach web-based voicemail/faxmail number to everybody but my friends.
  • I give my friends my cell phone number (I don't have a land line)
  • When asked for a postal address, I give out my statusfactory address. Statusfactory recieves my paper bills, scans them, puts them on the web for me, and mails out checks to my billers for me when I ask them to. (Unlike paymybills.com, they don't cave in to pressure from junk-mailing credit card companies who want your home address)
  • I own the domain that my email address is hosted on, and it is pointed at a server that I own, colocated in Texas.

The one chink in the armor is my mailing address for everything that isn't a bill. Statusfactory will only accept paper bills.


Why do I want to do this, you ask? Here are the benefits of having a level of indirection:
  • Reduces spam in all its forms (junkmail, email, telemarketers). When I sign up for a service, I use the address service-name@services.megacz.com where service-name is the domain name of the service. This way, if they leak my address to spammers, I know who did it. Furthermore, I can easily block mail from just that address.
  • Reduces the amount of paper mail that arrives at my house
  • It makes location and geography truly irrelevant
    • Makes moving a breeze. I move a lot, so I never have to change phone numbers, billing addresses, etc.
    • It allows you to be a road warrior quite easily. I can manage all my personal affairs from any place that has cellular coverage and a network connection (with ricochet, that means most metropolitan areas)
  • Owning my own domain means never changing my email address again, ever. I only use my work email address for work-related purposes (which is technically what my employer wants me to do anyways).
  • You get an extra level of privacy when only your friends know where you live and what number to dial to speak to you in person.
  • It's good practice in case I ever needed to practice split identity.

Like I said before, the one chink in the armor is my mailing address for everything that isn't a bill. Statusfactory will only accept paper bills. I'm looking for a service that offers most or all of the features below. Do any of you know of such a service?

  • Will recieve packages for me, hold them, and re-ship them on my command to any address I specify (at my expense, of course)
  • Will recieve paper documents (other than bills) for me, scan them, and put them on the web where I can access them.
  • Will allow me to upload a .gif or .pdf, which they will then print out, put in an envelope, and mail to an address I specify (at my expense, of course)
  • Will allow me to upload a .gif or .pdf, which they will then fax to a phone number I specify.

Sponsors

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Login

Poll
Would you find a service like this useful?
o Yes 38%
o No 10%
o Spatula 5%
o Pants 11%
o Beagle 1%
o Crawdad 2%
o Cactus Juice 4%
o Shut up, I'm contemplating the Fractal Nature of The Universe Inside Itself 25%

Votes: 70
Results | Other Polls

Related Links
o ureach
o statusfact ory
o domain
o colocated
o ricochet
o my employer
o Also by valency


Display: Sort:
Indirection for Modern-Day Personal Communication | 51 comments (38 topical, 13 editorial, 0 hidden)
expense? (3.66 / 3) (#5)
by ikarus on Wed May 16, 2001 at 08:18:39 PM EST

because i'm too lazy to follow all the links and try to look up prices: out of curiousity, how much does all of this cost you on a monthly basis?

Re: expense? (4.00 / 3) (#6)
by valency on Wed May 16, 2001 at 08:31:29 PM EST

Cell phone: $49/mo (most expensive part)
Voicemail/Faxmail number: $3/month (grandfathered plan)
Statusfactory: $10/month
Colocation: $39/month (grandfathered plan, and I do many other things with it)

You might say that the whole thing costs $100/month, but that neglects:
- the many other things I do with the colocation (I provide DNS, email, and web hosting to my friends and family), which are worth much more than $40.
- The $20/month I save by not having a land line (I make lots of long distance calls on my cell phone in the evenings)

I dropped the ricochet because it simply wasn't worth the $75/month, and I now have either 802.11 or kinko's most of the places I go.

Statusfactory pays for itself with the time it saves me. I highly reccomend the service. One-click bill paying, oh the joys.

- a



---
If you disagree, and somebody has already posted the exact rebuttal that you would use: moderate, don't post.
[ Parent ]
For everything else... (3.62 / 8) (#7)
by dennis on Wed May 16, 2001 at 09:58:38 PM EST

Voicemail/Faxmail number: $3/month
Statusfactory: $10/month
Colocation: $39/month

Feeling of freedom: Priceless.

[ Parent ]

Interesting (3.00 / 1) (#9)
by RangerBob on Wed May 16, 2001 at 10:13:55 PM EST

I had to give this a +1 just becuase it strikes me as so.... wierd. I mean, it's cool and all that you expend so much time doing this, but... why are you so afraid of people? I'd be really interested in how you'd handle dating.

Annoyed != Afraid (4.00 / 6) (#14)
by dennis on Thu May 17, 2001 at 09:27:07 AM EST

When he gets spammed he can make it stop. When he moves, as he does frequently, he has less hassle. He doesn't have to sift through as much crap in his mailbox as I do. He probably gets less telemarketing calls. And it interferes with his personal life not at all - when he dates, he can give the "friends only" number. What's weird?

It's very odd that whenever someone acts to take more control of his life, there are always people who attribute it to criminal and/or neurotic tendencies.

Incidentally, for anyone who's a nonprogrammer, a well-known truism in programming is "any problem can be solved by adding a layer of indirection." Valency has simply applied that to his personal life, and fixed some really annoying aspects of it.

[ Parent ]

The problem (3.00 / 1) (#17)
by RangerBob on Thu May 17, 2001 at 02:33:41 PM EST

The problem isn't about taking control of his life, the problem is that he appears to be hiding. And yeah, I've been a comp sci for a long time now thanks, so I know about indirection :) I'm not calling him a criminal, but going so far out of your way to do things like this is exactly the types of things that they treat at my wife's office. I'm honestly curious, because when I showed this article to them, they did think that he was exhibiting tendencies that some of their patients have.

[ Parent ]
Still don't get it (4.00 / 1) (#20)
by dennis on Thu May 17, 2001 at 06:07:16 PM EST

I just don't see why you say he's hiding. The only people he's hiding from are corporate marketers. Signing onto the services he uses probably took him very little time, and it probably saves him a lot of time. He's not going out of his way, he's making his life easier. When someone has a rational reason for what they do, it's silly to look for neuroses.

[ Parent ]
In this case.. (none / 0) (#24)
by DeadBaby on Thu May 17, 2001 at 08:02:53 PM EST

It seriously sounds like this guy is trying to rip people off or something. I mean seriously, if you´re too scared/paranoid to let people know your address you´re probably pissing someone off pretty badly to justify your fear.

Convince is one thing but spending $100+/month to avoid throwing away an envelope or hanging up on a tele-marketering is suspicious to me.

"Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us." - Carl Sagan
[ Parent ]
Are you a criminal? (2.00 / 1) (#25)
by dennis on Thu May 17, 2001 at 08:13:34 PM EST

You think his desire for privacy means he must have something to hide. And yet your email address says "hushmail"...what are you hiding, that you bother to use strong encryption for email? Are you a criminal, or just a troll?

Whether $100/mo is worth it depends on how valuable your time is.

[ Parent ]

Web mail (none / 0) (#27)
by DeadBaby on Thu May 17, 2001 at 09:33:59 PM EST

I don't even use their security services, it's just a good webmail service.

The point is, the guy is paying $100 to save a few minutes a month. That's just silly.
"Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us." - Carl Sagan
[ Parent ]
Not really 100 dollars (4.00 / 4) (#33)
by priestess on Fri May 18, 2001 at 08:05:16 AM EST

By my reckoning, since most people I know carry mobile phones and I pay for a web host service myself anyway, he's only paying EXTRA for the Voicemail/Fax and the Statusfactory which is all of thirteen dollars a month. The rest he'd have to spend Anyway to, you know, have a cellphone and a website or whatever he hosts there. I spend easily twice that on Booze at a weekend.

Pre.......

----
My Mobile Phone Comic-books business
Robots!
[ Parent ]
Measures seem mostly aimed at spammers. (4.50 / 4) (#28)
by Wayfarer on Fri May 18, 2001 at 01:29:41 AM EST

If the measures valency have taken are intended to prevent contact with anyone, they're a barrier against spammers; this additional level of indirection makes it harder for mass-mailers, spammers, and telemarketers to get through.

Remember: the primary goal of spamming is to reach as large an audience as possible, preferably at the least cost and effort possible. If you pick up the phone or receive their mail, this primary goal has been accomplished. Measures such as those described above can raise the difficulty level above that which a spammer is willing to pay for. After all, there are millions of other people out there who don't require additional measures to contact, some of whom will (foolishly, IMHO) respond. To bypass the indirection would be a waste of resources, from a spammer's perspective.

That said, note that the measures that valency has taken are directed against casual contact. For those he talks to on a regular basis, there are trusted channels, such as the cell phone number or actual mailing address. Furthermore, if valency was to engage in illegal activity, I'm sure that statusfactory would be legally obligated to surrender a home mailing address upon inquiry.

In short, the indirection is not one-size-fits-all; valency has implemented trusted channels for those who need them.


-W-

"Is it all journey, or is there landfall?"
-Ellison & van Vogt, "The Human Operators"


[ Parent ]
parroting the party line? (4.00 / 1) (#45)
by coffee17 on Wed May 23, 2001 at 11:27:57 AM EST

If you don't have anything to hide you won't mind being searched. Mind if I search your house?

Before you say something like "getting paper envelopes and having my house searched by some weirdo I know nothing about are entirely different." I will say that they are not. I've known people who've allowed me unsupervised into their home after a wee bit of contact over the internet. Just because you might not value something doesn't mean that another person can't. I value my privacy (I wouldn't want some odd xtian cult tracking me down and egging/destroying my house because they didn't like some anti-religious remark I made, or some pro-vasectomy statement I made), and I value my time (when I got my newest phone, I was interrupted at work on my cell phone 1-4 times a day by bill collectors from the previous occupant. Sadly, I still had to pay to get the number changed. I don't want to be interrupted to tell someone that I don't want to buy their product while I'm at home or at work. I don't want my neighbors to accidently get some junk mail in my mailbox, as they'll assume there's a reason I'm getting it (porn junk mail, "get out of debt" consolidators, etc... even if you haven't used the services in the past, your neighbors will think you have). Similarly I wouldn't want my neighbors to accidentally get my real mail in their box (at a mail boxes etc, mail seems to be more likely to be delivered correctly, and if it isn't, it goes to a semi-random person, instead of someone I see face to face near daily).

I will consent to (muted) advertising while watching TV, I understand that the adverts are why I don't have to pay as much for content. I will consent to seeing bill boards while in public areas. But I will not consent to advertisers invading my time in my home or at work.

Personally, I've never understood the people who seem to be against privacy (of course, sometimes (often?) they are only against other's privacy). Oh well, I suppose anti-privacy duck talk is just similar to anti-drug duck talk. All druggies are anchors around society's neck and all privacy advocates have something to hide.

Well, I guess I do have something to hide, and I'm not even much of an advocate. I want to hide my information. Others have no reason to need it, and now thanks to the web, if I want to give out my information I have a decent ability to do so.

-coffee


[ Parent ]

of course you don't think you're insane (4.00 / 1) (#44)
by coffee17 on Wed May 23, 2001 at 11:11:19 AM EST

You appear to be suffering from an overly rational complex. The doctors will recommend you spend all/any money in your bank account on items you've recently seen advertised, and that you talk poorly of others who are not cooperating with our corporate masters. Failure to do so may find you instituitionalized against your will you commie delusional anarchist.

or something like that... (tongue in cheek of course)

-coffee


[ Parent ]

so far out of his way? (4.00 / 1) (#43)
by coffee17 on Wed May 23, 2001 at 11:07:40 AM EST

What has he done which is so far out of his way? Having a cell phone? everyone has those. Having a bill payer service which conveniently doesn't give out one's address? It would probably be worth $10 a month to avoid having to write out checks to some people, and for $5 I'd probably sign up for it. Not having a land phone? if you move frequently, it's annoying having to constantly tell people/companies to update addresses. Also, if you're moving frequently, you can be biten from time to time for phone service. For some odd reason pac bell wanted a few hundred to setup a voice line for me (it was the second line in a house, and apparently they were spiteful that there had been a second line, but it had been deactivated for the last year+ (my current roommate's then roommate didn't want a land phone). And to the author, thanks for the reminder, I've been meaning to look for a voicemail service.

But then perhaps I'm additionally cautious as I once almost lost my identity (wound up in a new state with no address and no ID... that sucks to try and re-establish one's ID, and if I hadn't known people in the area I'd probably be fubar, not being able to get my real ID nor being able to get a new one.

In the times where one can easily commit a lot of fraud from one's personal information it is good to keep it. In the times where people are quite content to pay people to harass me to give them money (phone, mail and email spam) it makes sense to hide one's personal info. In the days where some "suspicious" activity might send the cops to your house because you're growing tulips in a hydroponic setup, it makes sense to hide your identity.

-coffee


[ Parent ]

Just because you're paranoid... (none / 0) (#34)
by Office Girl the Magnificent on Fri May 18, 2001 at 10:33:26 AM EST

...doesn't mean they're not after you.

I can definately relate to the frustration here. I just can't relate to the will to do all that to escape from it. It's a personal choice, and for me, I'd rather just deal with the spam. Although I've been seriously considering doing the bill-pay thing. But that's another story.

The Experiment: Beginnings
[ Parent ]

Not antisocial! (none / 0) (#49)
by phliar on Fri Jun 08, 2001 at 12:59:23 AM EST

why are you so afraid of people? I'd be really interested in how you'd handle dating.
Obviously, I'm speaking for myself here - I have almost an identical setup.

What this allows me to do is to let my life be just that - mine, to spend with friends and loved ones. When the phone rings, I know it's someone I care about and want to talk to (I have Caller ID). As for dating - any time I save by not stuffing bills into envelopes is time I can spend dating!

I have paid much, much more in late fees, penalties and reconnection charges than I could spend on services like statusfactory in a lifetime. With the mobile phone I don't worry about writing down phone numbers or taking directions with me. (I have the tiny Nokia phone, smaller than a pack of cigarettes.) Actually, I don't really know for sure how much it all costs me - the point is, it's not killing me and it improves the quality of my life.

It's simple: I get to chose the people who know where I live and who can get in touch with me at any time.


Faster, faster, until the thrill of...
[ Parent ]

Other Mail... (4.20 / 5) (#11)
by Giant Space Hamster on Wed May 16, 2001 at 11:29:47 PM EST

One thing you could do to handle mail other than bills is to rent a P.O. Box. Then, get a Redirection of Mail (Temporary) from the Post Office to redirect the mail from the postal box to whatever your current address is.

I was seriously considering this because I move every 4 months. It costs about $20/month (Canadian).

The only problem with this is some people, notably government agencies and many online retailers, will not send mail to a Postal Box.

-------------------------------------------
The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.
-- Bertrand Russell

Mail forwarding services (none / 0) (#15)
by RocketJeff on Thu May 17, 2001 at 10:53:01 AM EST

Another way to do this is with a professional mail forwarding service. I considered using one back when I was moving frequently (magazines never seemed to get address changes right). I never did use one though, I just found good magazine racks instead.

There are plenty of options, and prices, available. A quick Google search gives quite a few good hits on the first page (evidently it's popular with the yachting crowd).

[ Parent ]

temporary redirection (4.00 / 1) (#32)
by dennis on Fri May 18, 2001 at 07:12:14 AM EST

For those who don't want to bother with mail forwarding, but still want to reduce junk mail when they move:

I read recently that the post office sells a list of change-of-addresses to any marketer who wants one. However, they don't include temporary changes. You can take a temporary change of up to 364 days. You aren't losing anything by doing so, because the p.o. will only forward mail for a year anyway.

[ Parent ]

Living an oxymoron -1 (3.16 / 6) (#12)
by turtleshadow on Thu May 17, 2001 at 01:54:01 AM EST

When I first read this I heard in my mind, " Hi I want to learn how to be impossibly impersonal on a community based forum."


While I respect the desire and need for pseudonyms, valency, I have a hard time making it easy for people to set up shill identities that have no reprocussions. Im not implying you'd use such things for evil. But there are people that will. K5 is a community where people can find a spam free, noise free home. Why go through the trouble of avoiding the world rather than working on making the world better by action?
Turtleshadow

Philosophy... (2.50 / 2) (#13)
by slaytanic killer on Thu May 17, 2001 at 06:19:22 AM EST

I have a hard time making it easy for people to set up shill identities that have no reprocussions.
One of the most important things for humans is to have no bad repercussions of their actions. Losing what one considers her inessential identtiy is one step towards this.

The tension unfortunately is that the group wants a unique and simple-to-access identifier for her.

[ Parent ]
Elaboration (none / 0) (#21)
by turtleshadow on Thu May 17, 2001 at 07:57:34 PM EST

I'll elaborate my point.
The title of my response was Living an Oxymoron to the article Indirection for Modern Day Personal Communication.
I think most people agree Personal Communication is not Personal if not done directly.
Adding indirection directly incorporates impersonalness to the communication.

I've traveled extensively and my the solution to Valency's problem was hire a personal executive secretary. Its not unheard of, Batman had Alfred; The Tick had George, and in may levels of business its expected. If Valency is leading the Executive lifestyle as a Personal lifestyle more power to Valency.

I'm exploring if its contradictory to ask a question like this of K5 where the goal is to filter signal to noise by community effort.

Ok K5 so should you care if you can't tell you if my postings are written by me first hand or by my exec taking my scrawled bulleted list and putting it into sentance form?

I'm sure Valency is trying to elminate those "timewasters" and better time manage so posts are always personal but the thought is a bit disturbing kind a like asking your exec to buy your daughter's wedding gift.

As for the success of indirection a word of advice from a story of a co-worker. Creditors don't care who forgot to pay the bill they go after who bought the service in the first place. For some if they spend $99 for the $100 their owed, they got $1 back.
Turtleshadow

[ Parent ]
Full Name, Adress, and SSN please (4.25 / 8) (#19)
by Signal seven 11 on Thu May 17, 2001 at 03:47:34 PM EST

Since privacy is evil and must be eliminated, perhaps you'd like to start with yourself.

[ Parent ]
Oxymoron? I think not. (none / 0) (#50)
by phliar on Fri Jun 08, 2001 at 01:10:11 AM EST

While I respect the desire and need for pseudonyms, valency, I have a hard time making it easy for people to set up shill identities that have no reprocussions. Im not implying you'd use such things for evil. But there are people that will. K5 is a community where people can find a spam free, noise free home. Why go through the trouble of avoiding the world rather than working on making the world better by action?
This is the strangest reaction I've seen. Valency is no more than a K5 name, just as Turtleshadow is. I know as much or as little about the person behind one name as the one behind the other. Shill identities??! You seem to believe that Valency has acted in some way that is damaging to the K5 community. Valency is not avoiding the world - only unethical merchants. The people s/he cares about can use the real physical address, the mobile phone number, the real email address.

Where's the beef?


Faster, faster, until the thrill of...
[ Parent ]

Mail Boxes Etc. (4.00 / 4) (#16)
by farmgeek on Thu May 17, 2001 at 10:53:21 AM EST

The last I heard Mail Boxes ETC. would do this for you. Also, I don't find this un-nerving at all as I used to the same thing.

Now that I've settled down though, I've lessened the extremities of it.

I use mailboxes etc for most of my mail (except family members) and merely swing by there on my way home to pick up stuff.

For the phone I use a land line with an answering machine and never answer the phone directly. If they don't want to leave a message then I am sure that I don't wish to speak to them.

On that note, does anyone know of a very cheap PBX type system for the home. I'd like the ability to keep the phone from actually ringing at all unless a certain extension is entered.

Try your computer (5.00 / 1) (#18)
by Signal seven 11 on Thu May 17, 2001 at 03:44:02 PM EST

On that note, does anyone know of a very cheap PBX type system for the home. I'd like the ability to keep the phone from actually ringing at all unless a certain extension is entered.

I know people who do this with their computers. Sorry, I don't know the names of any programs. But, assuming you can find one, and you already have a computer, this would be a cheaper solution than getting a PBX.

[ Parent ]

related question (none / 0) (#36)
by guinsu on Fri May 18, 2001 at 11:43:10 AM EST

On that note, does anyone know of a very cheap PBX type system for the home. I'd like the ability to keep the phone from actually ringing at all unless a certain extension is entered.

Personally I have been looking for a telephone or caller ID box that will automatically stop the phone from ringing if there is no caller id or if it is blocked (sure sign of a telemarketer) and send the person right over to a special voice mail box (on the off chance it is a real person).

[ Parent ]
How about using your computer to do this? (none / 0) (#39)
by DrEvil on Fri May 18, 2001 at 08:30:06 PM EST

It should be easy enough to setup a modem that supports call display to interact with your computer to do just this.

If it is a call I want, keep ringing
else
take a message


and if you are away the machine can double as your answering machine for everyone.

[ Parent ]
Qwest (none / 0) (#42)
by enedwaith on Wed May 23, 2001 at 09:21:57 AM EST

I know that Qwest, at least in some areas, offers this service it blocks any calls that it can't get
an id for and routes the person to a service where
they can enter their id.

[ Parent ]
Counter Productive (3.50 / 2) (#23)
by DeadBaby on Thu May 17, 2001 at 07:58:38 PM EST

I understand that at some point, a reasonable person is virtually forced into taking extreme action but isn´t this going a bit far?

I mean seriously, when you have to pay over $100 a month to avoid a simple "I'm not interested", or a swift movement of the hand to delete a e-mail message or throw away a big ugly envelope aren't you really just causing yourself more problems than you´re solving?

I can understand not wanting to be bothered but, in reality, you are being bothered. I'll take the extra $100 a month myself.



"Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us." - Carl Sagan
Difference in degree (none / 0) (#51)
by phliar on Fri Jun 08, 2001 at 01:25:22 AM EST

when you have to pay over $100 a month to avoid a simple "I'm not interested", or a swift movement of the hand to delete a e-mail message or throw away a big ugly envelope aren't you really just causing yourself more problems than you´re solving?
I think "speak for yourself" would apply. In other words, it all depends on:
  1. how much unwanted "stuff" (email, pre-sorted junk mail etc.) you get and
  2. how much your time is worth to you.
Me, I get a shitload (technical term) of crap both via email and USmail; and $100 just isn't that great an amount. Actually it doesn't cost me that much - I'd have a mobile phone anyway, and if I didn't use the bill-paying service the bills wouldn't get paid, and I consider my ISP bill (domain plus DSL) as essential a utility as the electric bill or the land-line.

If I just add those bills together, it's somewhere around $100, true, but to put it in perspective: I could chose to spend that much on cable TV; and in San Francisco that's about 6% of my rent.


Faster, faster, until the thrill of...
[ Parent ]

How to be Invisible (5.00 / 1) (#35)
by Skeevy on Fri May 18, 2001 at 10:47:49 AM EST

The one chink in your armor is that you have a mailing address.

You might want to check out these books: How to be Invisible and It's None of Your Business

A trusted friend or lawyer might be able to handle your other requirements for you.



more like impersonal communication (3.00 / 2) (#40)
by Pink Daisy on Fri May 18, 2001 at 10:07:31 PM EST

Wow, you've made yourself almost unreachable. Personally, I just don't put my information all over the place, and I do fine. I get more wrong numbers than I do unwanted phone calls, although perhaps that is because my mobile provider doesn't give out numbers to people I wouldn't want them to give them to.
You know, if your time is so valuable that you don't want to speak to strangers, you can probably hire people to do all your shopping and cleaning. Your time is probably worth enough more that you can make a profit on it, too.

Real US Post Office Indirection (5.00 / 1) (#41)
by OddWeapon on Sun May 20, 2001 at 02:45:08 PM EST

What I want is something more integrated: The US Postal Service should provide me with a unique ID, say a 9 digiit zip code of my own or something or a POBOX at zip code 0. Then each and every letter sent to that indirect address can be properly routed by the post office once it is sent. I am not trying to hide, but I want one single address for life. I am sick of dealing with address changes when I move. I would be happy to pay for this... Am I the only one? All this remailer stuff if for the birds...

... plus protection against spam (none / 0) (#47)
by The Shrubber on Mon Jun 04, 2001 at 02:44:54 PM EST

Another thing the USPS could do is simply not allow bulk mailings to this special ID...

or maybe create two special IDs, one for personal use, and one disposable/renewable one for business correspondences. You could then create a new "correspondence class" mailing rate that'd be like bulk mailing, except that promotional material will not be sent (anybody sending promotional material to correspondance IDs will be billed some absurdly huge amount by USPS)

[ Parent ]
Domain Tinkering (4.00 / 1) (#46)
by SEWilco on Sun May 27, 2001 at 07:46:02 AM EST

Because you own your own domain, remember that you can also create subdomains if you need special purpose mail or web addresses.

Whew! (none / 0) (#48)
by phliar on Fri Jun 08, 2001 at 12:44:17 AM EST

Jesus! There are others who do this!

Yup, I use statusfactory for bills, own domain for email, give out email addresses based on who I'm giving it to etc. etc.! I also have a landline, because there are some people who just insist on a phone number. They can call it and leave a message which I might listen to at some point. On my mobile phone I have caller ID; if the number calling isn't in the address book of the phone, I don't answer it.

Why do I do this? I don't know. Obsessive-compulsive disorder maybe?

For accepting packages, documents, printing and snailmailing or faxing etc. what you need is a valet. Unfortunately that's a rather expensive solution. I'm waiting for Mom to retire, I know she'll be thrilled to do stuff like that for me!

Right now: I have all packages etc. shipped to my work address; the front desk will accept them for me (and even sign for them). Sending paper mail and faxing I do myself. (Actually I have a lot of trouble doing things like putting things in the mail, like paying bills etc.)


Faster, faster, until the thrill of...

Indirection for Modern-Day Personal Communication | 51 comments (38 topical, 13 editorial, 0 hidden)
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