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[P]
Cork and Dagger

By jjayson in Culture
Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 01:03:04 PM EST
Tags: etc (all tags)
/etc

With two runners in scoring position[?], facing off against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, on a 3-2 breaking ball[?] Chicago Cubs slugger Sammy Sosa dug for the ball and caught it on the lip of his bat, grounding[?] out into second base, driving in the runner on third with the sacrifice, cracking the bat into a couple pieces on the field, and splintering his — along with baseball's — image in the process.

Tampa Bay catcher[?] Toby Hall then noticed something, tossing a splinter of the bat at home plate umpire Tim McClelland's feet, saying "Look at this." Picking up the piece McClelland found a cork vein running through Sammy's wood and promptly tossed Sosa after calling Cubbies manager Dusty Baker out to take a look at the tampered wand. The bat was quickly carried away, along with Sosa image, and the rest of Sosa's stable of 76 bats were collected for analysis and taken away by a small very serious looking cadre of MLB officials. If you didn't know what was happening at Wrigley Field this Tuesday night, you would have assumed that the Bush administration finally found their proof of weapons of mass destruction.


McClelland, citing rule 6.06(D), ejected Sosa and returned the runners[?] to second the third removing a run from the board.

The superstar, recently named as the most marketed active player in baseball by Sports Business Journal, has been having difficulty after coming off the disabled list (DL)[?] for a big toe problem. Since his return, Sosa has hit an abysmal 2-for-15 with 8 strikeouts[?], including a 5 K outing last game. He hasn't left the yard since May 1 and has a only managed to send six over the fence all season, with 24 RBIs[?], while batting .285[?]. This all comes after Sosa has managed to hit 60 homers in three of his last five seasons, more 60 ding years than any other player: 66 in 1998, 63 in 1999, and 64 in 2001.

In the post-game press conference, Sosa denied that he knew the bat was tampered with. He said that he uses a corked bat when he takes batting practice (BP)[?] and in hitting exhibitions to make it more exciting for the fans and that he must had grabbed the wrong bat. Of course not everybody is buying this. We are talking somebody that can tell the difference between a 32 and 33 ounce bat by feel. Why would a hitter than can hit 450-foot bombs need any help? It's not like Sammy hits paint scrapers that clear the back wall by inches. This is the man that along with Mark McGwire revived baseball five years ago in a memorable home run race.

Some noticed that Sammy didn't bother to keep the bat handle he was left with after the rest of the bat was sent flying into the field. If I am Sammy, I take that bat, I dog it to first, and after being forced out, I quickly snatch up the splinters. Then I take those pieces down into the clubhouse and have them disappear. This is Chicago after all. There is a long history of a great organization that is known for making things (and people) disappear. You don't drop part of a corked bat at the feet of the catcher, especially when that is the piece that ultimately gets you caught. ESPN's SportsCenter also aired some tape that might have identified a 'C' marked in the cup at the end of the bat that presumably Sosa would have used to indicate which bats he corked for BP. At least, on Wednesday after testing, the commissioner's office of Major League Baseball (MLB) stated that none of the other 76 bats contained any foreign substances. They where all clean, which is consistent with Sammy's explanation.

However, these are all convenient excuses. Who would go to the plate without some sort of excuse to fall back on? Regardless, Sosa did go to the plate with a bat a few ounces short of a core. This damages the integrity of a sport that is having an image crisis. On how many of Sosa's 505 bombs did he "accidentally" pick up the wrong bat? We would never have known this time if his lumber hadn't broke on him -- and us.

This isn't McClelland's first such incident. He was also the presiding umpire the night George Brett was ejected in the infamous Pine Tar Incident and for Albert Belle's decorking, too. Neither is this Sammy's first questionable incident. Last year, after reports had surfaced that Sosa may have used performance enhancing steroids, Sosa said that he would be the first in line to be tested if MLB implemented a mandatory drug testing policy. Reporter Rick Reilly took that a little too literally and approached the muscular hitter with a cup, asking him to fill it up. Sosa became enraged at Reilly and was subsequently crucified in the media. Since the cork, Reilly has weighed in, "If he cheats with his bat, then it isn't much of a stretch for him to cheat with his body." Reilly has labeled the taint premanent calling for Sosa to immediately submit to steroid testing to at least show that part of his game is clean.

Even in the modern era of baseball, with the exploding extra hard bat, players have been caught doing some clandestine carpentry. Wilton Guerrero was forced to take an eight-game vacation for making his bat into an odd shaped coaster. Albert Belle was sidelined for ten games. However, Indians relief pitcher Jason Grimsley did his best Tom Cruise Mission Impossible impression, crawling trough the ceiling and dropping into the umpire's room to replace the confiscated bat with one of Paul Sorrento's bats before it could be X-rayed. On appeal, Belle's suspension was reduced to seven games since he was never actually caught using a corked bat (although he did appear to be using an autographed Sorrento bat). Billy Hatcher was hit with an eight-game suspension when the bat he borrowed from pitcher Dave Smith shattered. Too bad he borrowed one of Smith's corked bats.

Corking a Bat

Corking a bat usually involves drilling a hole down the center of the fat end of the bat, filling it with a foreign substance, and the covering the hole so as to not be detected. However, the bat cannot be doctored too much. The bore can only be about 8-inches long, maybe up to 3/4-inch wide, and must be straight. Anything larger or off center and the integrity of the bat will be severely compromised.

Next, the bore must be filled in with something that gives; often this is cork. However, players have been known to use superballs or rubber. The filling needs to be cut into small pieces and tightly packed into the bat. If not, the desired effect will not be produced and the bat will have a hollow sound when contact with the ball is made, certain to raise the plate umpire's interest. Some players have even used more exotic substances like mercury or other metals, but because of the physics of the baseball, these metals are almost certainly a bad idea. When the ball strikes the bat, something must give. Either the ball can give and deform or the bat can. The ball gives back energy very poorly, wasting 75-percent of its captured energy in heat. The bat, however, is made for this. It gives back energy at nearly 100-percent, so a harder substance in the bat will only prevent it from deforming to absorb energy and cause the ball to deform more, wasting energy when the ball rebounds. From a weight perspective corking a two pound bat will only remove about two ounces.

The opinions about how a corked bat works are varied. One theory is that a lighter bat allows the batter to generate more bat speed. However, tests have shown that corking a bat only increases bat speed by 1.1 mph. That is less than a 1-percent increase in swings that can travel over 100 mph, and the loss of weight in the bat probably counteracts any performance gain. Another theory is that a corked bat allows players to hit with the density of a heavier bat, but the weight of a lighter bat. Still another theory is that the material inside the bore can be used to "soften" the bat and store more energy in it instead of the ball. This is said to probably not be correct either since it is the outer wood that deforms and filling a bat with superballs isn't likely to make it deform too much more. The cork cannot release its energy fast enough either since the ball is only in contact with the bat for a thousandth of a second. A fourth theory is that it just doesn't do anything. Baseball players are well known to be superstitious and play mind games with themselves. This may just be another case of doing something stupid so they can feel they are getting an advantage, and we all know that baseball players have a long history of stupidity.

Sosa didn't need to take the chance of even corking his BP bat. The balls are juiced. The parks are juiced. The players are juiced. These have all been far more responsible for rocketing balls into the stands than some left over pieces of a few wine bottles. There is no reason to risk his trip to Cooperstown when it is assured.

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Poll
Do you believe Sosa?
o It was a mistake and an isolated incident. 18%
o He did use the corked bat intentionally, but just this time. 1%
o He has probably used a corked bat before when having troubles. 14%
o All his numbers are now suspect. 17%
o In the end, it really doesn't matter. 48%

Votes: 85
Results | Other Polls

Related Links
o ?
o ? [2]
o ? [3]
o cracking the bat
o ? [4]
o calling Cubbies manager Dusty Baker out
o rule 6.06(D)
o ? [5]
o ? [6]
o ? [7]
o ? [8]
o ? [9]
o ? [10]
o none of the other 76 bats contained any foreign substances
o damages the integrity of a sport
o the infamous Pine Tar Incident
o players have been caught
o clandestin e carpentry
o Also by jjayson


Display: Sort:
Cork and Dagger | 185 comments (100 topical, 85 editorial, 1 hidden)
How pitchers defend themselves from corked bats (3.87 / 8) (#4)
by pyramid termite on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 07:51:08 AM EST

Vaseline.

On the Internet, anyone can accuse you of being a dog.
I really don't know how to vote for this (2.87 / 8) (#6)
by gordonjcp on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 07:58:34 AM EST

+1, kind of interesting, -1 WTF is it about?
+1, We all love to hear about cheats getting their comeuppance, -1 Isn't Rounders a children's game?

Fsck it, +1 section.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


-1, girls are beautiful (1.00 / 15) (#17)
by bayou on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 10:54:23 AM EST



In other news... (4.40 / 10) (#23)
by sophacles on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 11:39:17 AM EST

The on going urban battle between Cubs and White Sox fans has taken a turn in favor of the south siders.  The Wrigleyville scene was subdued tuesday night as the normally jovial Cubs fans tried to find a way to spin this against the Sox fans.  "This is no good, we usually have untill July or August before we have to start preparing our defensive campaign against Sox fans.  This may even set our campaign back a couple of years." said one Cubs fan at the renowed bleacher bum hangout, Murphy's Bleachers.  A blow like this may even have the unheard of effect of breaking the die-hard resolve of Cubs fans.

"I doubt this will be so drastic as that," said one expert on the matter, "Cubs fans have been filling the stands for over 90 years without a World Series to bolster them.  In fact, Cubs fans expect the worst, this may even strengthen their resolve."  The full effect of this remains to be seen.

Meanwhile on the south side of chicago, at the Halsted street bars (a long standing center for Sox fan activity) the scene was much more lively.  "Unrghh sshhherlyx xgbh fuck the cubs gahhh" slurred one happy White Sox fan.  Another stated, "Our team may ssshuck, but at leasht we arennn't scheaters like shammy".

One thing is certain though, the long standing rivalry between the north and south sides, already bitter, is certain to rise to new levels.  The department of homeland security has raised the terror alert for Chicago to red.  "The situation in Chicago, comparable to the Israel/Palestine conflict, was already high, but with this incident we must be prepared for everything," said one official.  He further warned the people of chicago to stock up on essential supplies, such as Old Style, Miller Light, mustard, and sausages, as there may be shortages while both camps plan their strategies.

The battle may have already been joined in force.  An FBI spokesman has stated that Email lists of chicagoans have already been high in inflamitory activity.  "On one of the lists we monitor, baseball fans have already been arguing for 9 hours, including threats and offensive jokes."  It is well know that the FBI has been watching mailing lists of sports fans for possible terror activities after the bombing at the Atlanta Olympics.

Not all that far off from how it really is..(n/t) (3.25 / 3) (#40)
by Coldfire on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 01:39:23 PM EST


--
Just pay attention.
[ Parent ]
Cubs/Sox joke for those who care (4.53 / 15) (#25)
by sophacles on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 11:47:35 AM EST

An elementary teacher starts a new job at a school in Milwaukee and
trying to make a good impression on her first day, explains to her class that
she's a Brewers fan. She asks the class to raise their hands if they
too are Brewers fans. Everyone in the class raises their hand except
one little girl. The teacher looks at the girl with surprise and says: "Mary, why
didn't you raise your hand?"

Because I'm not a Brewers fan," she replied.

The teacher, still shocked, asked:
"Well, if you're not a Brewers fan, then who do you support?"

"I'm a Cubs fan, and proud of it," Mary replied.

The teacher could not believe her ears.
"Well Mary, might you explain why are you a Cubs fan?"

"Because my Mom and Dad are from Chicago and my Mom is a Cubs fan and
my dad is a Cubs fan, so I'm a Cubs fan too!"

"Well," said the teacher, in an obviously annoyed tone, "that's no
reason for you to be a Cubs fan. You don't have to be just like your
parents all of the time. What if your Mom was a prostitute and your dad
was a drug addict and a car thief, what would you be then?"

Mary said, "I'd be a White Sox fan."


Correction..... (3.00 / 1) (#48)
by Yanks Rule on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 02:50:37 PM EST

That's actually an old Raiders joke, converted to baseball..... :-)

"I do think we live in dangerous times, and anybody who looks at the world and says this is the time to be a wuss--I can't buy that anymore. " -- Dennis Miller
[ Parent ]

Actually (3.25 / 3) (#149)
by damiam on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 09:12:50 PM EST

It was originally a Democrat/Republican joke:

During his 1904 presidential campaign, Teddy Roosevelt made a whistle-stop train trip. During the course of one impassioned speech, the president was interrupted when a man emerged from a nearby saloon and cried out, "I'm a Dimmycrat! I'm a Dimmycrat!"
Exasperated, Roosevelt addressed the heckler. "Why, sir, are you a Democrat?" "Because me grandfather was a Dimmycrat, and me father was a Dimmycrat, and I'm a Dimmycrat," the heckler retorted.
Sarcastically, Teddy rejoined, "My friend, suppose your grandfather was a jackass, and your father had been a jackass? What would you be?"
Instantly the Irishman replied, "A Republican."

-- Too Funny to be President, Morris Udall.



[ Parent ]

At least Sammy's not a Yankee. (2.69 / 13) (#34)
by Captain_Tenille on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 12:46:49 PM EST


----
/* You are not expected to understand this. */

Man Vs. Nature: The Road to Victory!

As a longtime Cubs fan.. (4.16 / 6) (#38)
by Coldfire on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 01:15:46 PM EST

My opinion of the matter is probably biased, but here it is, anyway..I think Sammy just made an honest, human mistake in not paying attention to what bat he pulled out of the rack in the dugout before he went to the plate in the 1st. He has put on massive power display shows in BP for years; fans will come early to the ballpark just to see him take batting practice, and according to his side of the story, that is because he was using a corked bat, just to give the fans a little show..

I don't believe for an instant that he's been using corked bats for an extended period of time..this isn't the first time he has broken a bat; he's broken several over the years and none of them were ever observed to have cork or another illegal substance in them. Unfortunately, many, including Rick Telander of the Chicago Sun Times have now crucified him (in this case, with perverse glee) and the media in general appears to be questioning all of his accomplishments up to this point.

The proof will come from Major League Baseball, which has in its possession all of Sammy's bats in order, presumably, to check for cork in each and every one. I believe that they won't find any, though, as I trust Sosa. If he was lying, though, if it was just chance that only the noncorked bats were broken..I can't forgive that, at least not right away. That would be a true dishonor in this situation to himself, his team, and the city of Chicago.
--
Just pay attention.

yeah but it's baseball, (1.50 / 3) (#41)
by Run4YourLives on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 01:42:43 PM EST

just like I said in my other comment.

It's slightly Japanese, but without all of that fanatical devotion to the workplace. - CheeseburgerBrown
Other Corked Bats in Baseball (4.00 / 5) (#42)
by egg troll on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 01:43:13 PM EST

ESPN has a little article on other corked bats that players were caught with.

On a related note, the umpire who tossed Sammy was the same one behind the plate during the infamous George Brett Pine Tar Bat incident.

He's a bondage fan, a gastronome, a sensualist
Unparalleled for sinister lasciviousness.

How to cork a bat... (3.00 / 1) (#124)
by sophacles on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 11:53:29 AM EST

There has been a segment on ESPN TV every other hour for the last couple days on how to cork a bat too.  Actually pretty interesting.


[ Parent ]
yep (3.00 / 1) (#136)
by jjayson on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 03:01:50 PM EST

Buck Showalter is pretty funny, too: "And that's how you cork a bat. Oh, but don't do this. It's illigal."
_______
Smile =)
* bt krav magas kitten THE FUCK UP
<bt> Eat Kung Jew, bitch.

[ Parent ]
Corking (4.40 / 10) (#47)
by gbd on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 02:47:31 PM EST

Am I the only one who, upon hearing all of this discussion about corking on ESPN, immediately thought of the Roman Moronie character from Johnny Dangerously?

<thick accent>

"Sammy Sosa, that corking icehole, had better stop this corking nonsense or I'll whack him with his farging bat, rip off his bells, and shove them down his corksucking throat, the bastage."

</thick accent>

--
Gunter glieben glauchen globen.

Poor wanker (3.90 / 11) (#49)
by idiot boy on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 03:17:36 PM EST

Although this one's a multimillionaire and hence won't get too much sympathy (esp. given his past aledged indiscretions), I'm starting to feel more and more that sports men and women get too much of a hard time.

The arseholes who run the major sports engage in activities that make the steroid taking, cork bats and scuffed cricket balls of the world look like youthfull highjinks.

I'll put aside for one moment the fact that sport exploits and burns out thousands of working class youths every year (killing or paralysing a few more for good measure) who NEVER make the millions of the few who make it and concentrate on the "cheating" of the sport bosses.

In the UK we have the MCC (Marylebone Cricket Club) who've just allowed a politically cleansed Zimbabwean team come here to play (Mugabe didn't want a repeat of the black armbands).

In the US you have the MLB people who run a rigged and anti-competetive (strange given that it's a sport) league which guarentees profits for them at the expense of the sports watching public. There's a very good article in this weeks Economist but it's subscription only at the website .

FIFA is corrupt and seems to do its best to ensure that international football (sorry, I like the US game but I refuse to call mine soccer) sucks as hard as it can. Sep Blatter... don't get me started.

The Olympic Commitee. Well, Atlanta, need I say more?

These are the real bad guys in sport. The real losers are us trying to watch our favourite games and the tens of thousands of young sportspeople who in their desperation to "make it", destroy their careers and bodies to serve the arseholes who run our sports.

Sort out the spelling and other nasties (other folk have already caught them all) and you'll get +1FP. Well written and interesting (unlike my slightly drunken rant).

--
Science is a way of trying not to fool yourself

jargon (4.22 / 9) (#54)
by SocratesGhost on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 04:30:52 PM EST

There's been a number of editorial complaints that this article uses too much jargon. While this makes it difficult for the casual reader and the non-Americans among us, the writing feels more authentic because of its inclusion. The author could tone it down a bit and increase the readership, but by using jargon he succeeds in engaging the reader.

Don't know what a "RBI" is? Then ask. We're a discussion site. You might learn something.

-Soc
I drank what?


Thought someone may say this (3.00 / 1) (#62)
by gazbo on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 07:09:33 PM EST

Obviously he shouldn't explain everything, else the article would be ludicrously long and unreadable. However, when using an initialism, why not simply use the expanded form first time? Also, jargon may be necessary, but slang? And none of it explained?

If it were just RBI then you may have a point; however there are entire paragraphs that are gibberish to me. It could be that as you know about it yourself you don't realise just how impenetrable it is. As I don't know about baseball I don't expect to pick up all of the subtleties, but as it stands I find myself scrolling past huge sections, scanning for text that looks like English so I can understand it.

It would be ludicrous to have to ask what everything meant in the comments, just so that I could then go back and say "Ah, so that's what the story was supposed to mean!"

-----
Topless, revealing, nude pics and vids of Zora Suleman! Upskirt and down blouse! Cleavage!
Hardcore ZORA SULEMAN pics!

[ Parent ]

Why not link? (3.50 / 3) (#86)
by Urthpaw on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 11:44:34 PM EST

A link to Google Glossary or Everything2 would be helpful. A super-scripted "?", Slashdot style, might also work.

[ Parent ]
great idea (3.50 / 3) (#87)
by jjayson on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 11:57:33 PM EST

but a lot of work. I'll see what I can do.

I think the story may already be dead since the those not living in the US (or possibly Japan) will probably tank it. I should have timed this better to get the American vote.
_______
Smile =)
* bt krav magas kitten THE FUCK UP
<bt> Eat Kung Jew, bitch.

[ Parent ]

Not true (3.25 / 3) (#101)
by gazbo on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 04:46:41 AM EST

Although it's true that many non-Americans will vote it down because it's about a sport they have no knowledge of, what you have on your side is that the bulk of it is actually about tampering.

Also, some of your edits have made it much more readable - I've not re-read it all the way through, but at least you've explained either in the text or through hyperlinks what some of the stuff means. At the moment you're looking at either a 0 or +1 from me - dunno which. I figure at the very least the effort of explaining all the terms to a global audience should be encouraged and not voted down.

-----
Topless, revealing, nude pics and vids of Zora Suleman! Upskirt and down blouse! Cleavage!
Hardcore ZORA SULEMAN pics!

[ Parent ]

Japan? (3.00 / 1) (#157)
by SamuraiJack on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 02:38:03 AM EST

They LIKE baseball, remember?

[ Parent ]
Sorry (3.44 / 9) (#55)
by Kasreyn on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 04:32:06 PM EST

But I'm incapable of feeling sympathy for anyone who makes millions and millions of dollars for playing a game, especially when most of these pro athlete fuckers actually have the nerve to whine that they're underpaid. I don't care if their mother is raped to death by mad goats and their house is flattened by a meteor and they're infected with the flaming purple heebie-jeebies from an infected wombat bite after seeing their girlfriend decapitated in a freak auto accident. Nope, no sympathy here.


-Kasreyn


"Extenuating circumstance to be mentioned on Judgement Day:
We never asked to be born in the first place."

R.I.P. Kurt. You will be missed.
OK . . . (4.40 / 5) (#73)
by ubernostrum on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 08:14:41 PM EST

So how about sypmatby for a guy who goes back to the underdeveloped country of his birth during the offseason and uses his money to improve things so that kids growing up there now will have it better than he did on the streets?

Oh wait, I forgot, they're all just whiny overpaid arrogant jocks. None of them ever actually do anything wholesome like setting up charities or such.


--
You cooin' with my bird?
[ Parent ]

Are you serious? (4.00 / 11) (#60)
by Tex Bigballs on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 06:31:51 PM EST

If I am Sammy, I take that bat, I dog it to first, and after being forced out at first, I quickly snatch up the splinters. Then I take those pieces down into the clubhouse and have them disappear. You don't drop part of a corket bat at the feet of the catcher, especially when that is the piece that ultimately gets you caught

Imagine how that would look, a player running around frantically picking up splinters of a broken bat.

Players don't even pick up their own intact bats after they hit the ball. I could only imagine seeing them tidying up the infield after a broken bat sac rbi.

Interesting article but more like a red herring than anything else. Most of the players in the MLB are probably juicing plus on ritalin and any other performance enhancer that they think will give them an edge. Especially Sosa (which you noted in your article) Rick Reilly from SI already pretty much busted for doing roids. If they're going to cheat, they might as well cheat all the way.

Play against Clemens (3.80 / 5) (#61)
by cam on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 06:42:07 PM EST

Imagine how that would look, a player running around frantically picking up splinters of a broken bat.

If you play for the Mets, Clemens chucks the bits of bat back at you. In that situation Sammy could just catch the bits as Clemens throws them at him and noone would be the wiser.

cam
Freedom, Liberty, Equity and an Australian Republic
[ Parent ]

The mysterious drduck (4.11 / 9) (#71)
by TerranceDaktill on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 08:07:03 PM EST

has rated you again Tex. I await comments from this individual but alas he cannot type, only click on drop-down boxes.

[ Parent ]
I notice that about the duck, too. (4.37 / 8) (#91)
by JayGarner on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 01:48:48 AM EST

Some yellow-bellied pencil-neck is using that as his 'rating' account.

[ Parent ]
and his email address seems to bounce (4.25 / 4) (#103)
by rvcx on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 05:21:40 AM EST

I also thought it might have been an obfuscation of "usa.com", but that bounces, too.

This makes me wonder whether there should be a way to turn an account "untrusted" without that user ever posting a comment. A silent user who does nothing but tell other people to shut up...how obnoxious.

[ Parent ]

He's no big deal (4.50 / 4) (#104)
by jjayson on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 06:10:57 AM EST

He only gives single ratings; he doesn't modbomb. From what I can tell, he only does it in stories and not diaries. He just happens to have a very high standard. I think the first 20 ratings I received from him were all 1s until he game me something else (I think he rates higher now than he did a few months ago).

I do see people that will rate to correct his low ratings and that means that more people are raing which is good.

I thought that everybody had already complained abotu drduck. I didn't know he was still a contentious topic.
_______
Smile =)
* bt krav magas kitten THE FUCK UP
<bt> Eat Kung Jew, bitch.

[ Parent ]

It's not really a big deal (4.40 / 5) (#125)
by TerranceDaktill on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 12:02:57 PM EST

but it's like he's a secret judge. I don't want him to post so he can be mod-bombed, I'm just interested in what he might have to say and how that relates to his modding.

[ Parent ]
Contentious? (4.20 / 5) (#141)
by JayGarner on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 04:55:36 PM EST

Not really, more a mild curiosity. So I guess it doesn't matter if I missed that deadline for griping you allude to.

I do notice the rare comments that got the duck's '4' rating seem to be no more insipid or insightful than the ones he gave '1's. Maybe it's a script, who knows. Funny idea, really, having a ratings-only account.

[ Parent ]

Add trogglebyte to the list (4.00 / 4) (#128)
by TerranceDaktill on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 12:40:51 PM EST

of rating non-posters. You and drduck should get together sometime. Oh wait, you'd have nothing to say, you'd just rate each other.

[ Parent ]
Fark Rick Reilly (3.75 / 4) (#131)
by debillitatus on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 02:27:12 PM EST

...Rick Reilly from SI already pretty much busted for doing roids...

Oh, I see how it is. Some journalist can accuse you of doing anything, and unless you piss in a cup, you're guilty? This is crap.

Reilly's move was nothing more than a PR gimmick and you fell for it.

Damn you and your daily doubles, you brigand!
[ Parent ]

Sorry but (3.00 / 3) (#133)
by Tex Bigballs on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 02:46:44 PM EST

I take the opposite view. If I say something, and somebody tells me to "put my money where my mouth is" so-to-speak, and I don't, then that's fair play.

Tell me this, what would Sosa have had to lose if he actually was drug-free and he pissed in a cup? The inconvenience of pissing in a cup?

He would have had a lot to gain, though.

For one thing, it would have made his accomplishments to baseball that much more valid in the eyes of a lot of his critics.

Secondly, it would have made him a hero to a lot of his co-workers for doing his part to clear their name and the sport of baseball. If this guy can get it done without juicing, then maybe a lot of these other guys can too.

Let's face it. Sosa didn't get indignant with Rick Reilly because he's some sort of advocate for privacy rights or any high-minded reason like that. He refused the offer because he is on the juice, and he didn't want to be crucified fo it.

[ Parent ]

Please note (3.40 / 5) (#65)
by medham on Wed Jun 04, 2003 at 07:34:16 PM EST

If you can read this, and you don't know anything about baseball, you need to go back to your studies. Baseball is an American and geek icon: try out Zork II if you don't believe me.

The real 'medham' has userid 6831.

Zork II (3.25 / 3) (#112)
by b1t r0t on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 09:07:19 AM EST

Yeah, I remember that. I had to freaking disassemble the game code to figure it out. (This was in the '80s, so I couldn't just Google for it.)

-- Indymedia: the fanfiction.net of journalism.
[ Parent ]
Then (1.00 / 6) (#126)
by medham on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 12:03:35 PM EST

You're either a liar, stupid, or lazy. It's not hard at all to get the puzzle by accident, and I seriously doubt that you disassembled the code when that would have been extremely difficult and when there were Invisiclues widely available.

The real 'medham' has userid 6831.
[ Parent ]

And Zork I (3.25 / 3) (#119)
by Happy Monkey on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 10:38:34 AM EST

for that matter.
___
Length 17, Width 3
[ Parent ]
Picking up the pieces. (3.00 / 3) (#89)
by Fredrick Doulton on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 01:15:14 AM EST

> If I am Sammy, I take that bat, I dog it to first, and after being forced out at first, I quickly snatch up the splinters.
> Then I take those pieces down into the clubhouse and have them disappear.

Yeah, like that wouldn't have been suspicious or anything.

Bush/Cheney 2004! - "Because we've still got more people to kill"

Publicity (4.00 / 5) (#107)
by MrLarch on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 08:27:18 AM EST

I say it's a stunt. The coach/manager/PR guy says "here, Sammy, use this bat. Best case: better performance; worst case: publicity. You can't lose!" Some network TV morning show (whose reporting on the subject didn't exceed clips of ignorant fan speculation) ended the story with something about a "black eye" on the baseball league. What they meant to say was 'all eyes are turned on (them|him)'.

Crooked games (3.50 / 8) (#109)
by Ming D. Merciless on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 08:35:27 AM EST

I live in Cooperstown and as such get baseball rammed down my throat by the 300,000 people per year who visit what's left of my home town (90% of whom decide to show up in July and August it seems). Almost every single damn shop on Main Street which used to hold small, but useful merchants has been turned over to feed the mass merchandising craze that is Major League Baseball. There is precious little left in this town that hasn't been tainted by a team logo and worst of all it's been oozing out into the surrounding small towns and villages this past decade. the latest craze is baseball camps.

So... you might guess that when it comes to baseball, that I'm a bitter and cynical man. You'd be right. However, I've got to say thanks for an excellent article exposing the crooked pink underbelly of the Major Leagues.

He cheated (4.28 / 7) (#113)
by Bob Abooey on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 09:59:32 AM EST

Period. If he had one bat that was corked for batting practice it would be marked in such a manner so he wouldn't just pick it up by mistake. I think he cheated. I think, given that, he has cheated in the past. I think that makes all his number suspect. I think he should be tested for steroids. I think if you will cheat a little you will cheat a-lot. Period.


-------
Americans will tolerate just about anything as long as you don't stop traffic - Dan Rather
Wouldn't matter (3.00 / 2) (#148)
by damiam on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 08:58:42 PM EST

Plenty of baseball players use steroids openly (Mark McGwire, anyone?) and no one gives a fuck.

[ Parent ]
-1, I just woke up and now I'm eating Muslix (1.00 / 20) (#114)
by bayou on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 10:06:43 AM EST



Cheating In Baseball? (4.16 / 6) (#116)
by duxup on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 10:16:32 AM EST

I'm a baseball fan, I'm also not surprised that there's cheating in baseball.  This is a sport that only recently implemented random drug testing, only through next year (unless a fair amount of people get caught), and who's banned substances list is woefully short.  

As for his lack of picking up the splinters being proof he didn't know the bat was corked, I think that is ridiculous.  Players just don't pick up their bats all that often, regardless if they're broken, if hit safely, or not.  

In this age of multi media I doubt he could have saved himself that way.  I think if Sosa knew it was a corked bat that broke then he knew once it was on the field he was caught.  Since this was Sosa's first time getting caught he probably knew also that getting caught would mean a suspension and stiff fine, but not much more than that.  Picking up the bat on the other hand would only have made him look more guilty.  Picking up the bat was not in Sosa's best interest, and thus his lack of doing so doesn't prove anything either way.

Did Sosa know he was batting with a corked bat?  

I can't say yes for sure, but I'm very suspicious.

Regardless of your wishes to impress the fans why would you want to risk bringing such a bat to a game?  Not just that, but it would seem inevitable that if the bat is accessible during the game that there would be some temptation to use it?

It was at the very least a poor decision on Sosa's part, and short of a good explanation (I don't believe we've gotten one) I'll suspicious of him for the rest of his career.

Baseball lost its image a while ago (3.66 / 6) (#118)
by Silent Chris on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 10:33:23 AM EST

With two runners in scoring position, facing off against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, on a 3-2 breaking ball Chicago Cubs slugger Sammy Sosa dug for the ball and caught it on the lip of his bat, grounding out into second base, driving in the runner on third with the sacrifice, cracking the bat into a couple pieces on the field, and splintering his -- along with baseball's -- image in the process.

In my opinion, baseball lost its image after the numerous strikes, ridiculous injuries (big toe?), and when players were making more off contracts than the cost of buying the actual team.  Baseball players have basically screwed fans over for years -- and they know that.  I can't say I blame them.  If I was in a position to earn $50,000 for lazily walking onto a grass field, swing a piece of wood a few times, run (maybe not), then stand in the grass for hours on end, I'd probably do the same.  Hell, some of these guys get $1000 just for spitting.

But the players aren't the problem.  The problem is the fans.  How many signs have I seen during strikes at ballparks that say "That's it, I'm not coming again!"  But they keep coming back.  What draws them?  Tradition?  "Love of the game"?  I'll admit my bias: I personally find baseball boring.  Basketball and hockey are more my speed.  But if either were to cancel their seasons because of strikes, I'd most likely give up watching them permanently (NHL, you already have 2 strikes against you for the contract dispute in '95).  Whenever baseball has a contract problem there's disdain, some hand-wringing, and ultimately everybody comes back.

What would happen if fans actually did get fed up?  Probably nothing but good things.  Salaries would become reasonable, ticket prices would go down, and the World Series would probably go back to being an actual sport than a multi-game Superbowl with advertisements.  

As it stands right now, I find nothing reasonable with baseball.  I would not encourage my kids to pursue the sport, if I had any kids, unless they were extremely good and had no distinguishable morals.  If they were, I'd say "go for it if you want to".  If they want to rape peoples' wallets that'd be their decision.

Big toe injuries not serious? (3.33 / 2) (#146)
by phliar on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 07:23:45 PM EST

ridiculous injuries (big toe?)
Spoken like someone who hasn't injured one! I once sprained/bruised my big toe playing soccer — man, walking really sucked! It was surprisingly hard, and I also realised how much you use it to balance when standing.

My right thumb was in a cast for a couple of months (injured it playing cricket) — talk about an incapacitating injury. I was incapable of doing anything for myself. (Those injuries were way back in the eighth and ninth grades, when I was actually fit.) Ever since I've laughed when people say things like "I'm all thumbs!" The thumb is the most important finger, and the big toe is the most important toe.

Faster, faster, until the thrill of...
[ Parent ]

I have had my toe broken (3.00 / 3) (#154)
by Silent Chris on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 12:51:21 AM EST

However, in a sporting environment, you're supposed to live with it.  That's your one and only job: to compete physically.  By contrast, how often does a hockey player stop play because of a broken toe?  I've seen some guys continue to play while getting stitches on the the bench.

[ Parent ]
THANK YOU! (3.25 / 3) (#156)
by SamuraiJack on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 02:30:12 AM EST

Yes, Hockey players have to nearly be hospitalized before they're willing to stop playing.  All other sports pale by comparison.  :-)

[ Parent ]
No kidding. (3.00 / 3) (#159)
by driph on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 05:08:13 AM EST

I wouldn't doubt if injuries contributed to the Wild losing, but hell, gotta give em credit, those guys stuck it through.

--
Vegas isn't a liberal stronghold. It's the place where the rich and powerful gamble away their company's pension fund and strangle call girls in their hotel rooms. - Psycho Dave
[ Parent ]
Ok, but (1.25 / 4) (#122)
by minerboy on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 11:04:28 AM EST

Sometime Could we have an article sometime that's not complaining, accusatory, cynical, smarmy, or negative in tone. Something about people doing something good - but not about math or food. Not that math or food articles are bad, they seem to be the only positive articles we see on K5.



no! /nt (3.00 / 1) (#184)
by mcgrew on Mon Jun 09, 2003 at 03:46:11 PM EST


"The entire neocon movement is dedicated to revoking mcgrew's posting priviliges. This is why we went to war with Iraq." -LilDebbie
[ Parent ]

-1. (4.16 / 6) (#123)
by ubernostrum on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 11:41:58 AM EST

You pretty much assume he was trying to cheat, dismiss his attempt to explain as "a convenient excuse", and generally decide he's guilty less than 48 hours after the incident. You might want to allow time for an investigation, or report the results of said investigation (like the 76 other bats which were examined and found not to be corked).

Rewrite from a neutral or investigatory perspective.


--
You cooin' with my bird?

I don't think anyone's arguing... (3.33 / 2) (#127)
by rvcx on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 12:28:05 PM EST

...that he didn't cheat. He used a corked bat. He cheated. He admitted it himself.

The author does seem to have taken the view that it was intentional, but I really disagree with voting down a story because you don't like its conclusions. No wonder we never get any conservative op-eds posted...

Frankly, I'm not very happy with the idea that he used a corked bat at all. "I only used it in batting practice to impress the fans"? So you're willing to lie to the fans about what you can do and that's all right? Even if he had never used a doctored bat in a game I'd still think less of him for that.

[ Parent ]

Yeah, whatever (3.00 / 3) (#132)
by truth versus death on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 02:29:56 PM EST

He's suggesting voting down because the conclusion is unsupported.

"any erection implies consent"-fae
[ Trim your Bush ]
[ Parent ]
But I did mention the other 76 bats... (3.00 / 3) (#134)
by jjayson on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 02:48:16 PM EST

From the story:

"At least, on Wednesday after testing, the commissioner's office of Major League Baseball (MLB) stated that none of the other 76 bats contained any foreign substances. They where all clean, which is consistent with Sammy's explanation."

However, no amount of investigation can change the facts of what he did. To me, it looks overly convenient. Sosa was in a slump and thought he would see what he could get away with.

I am being light compared what many sports writers did to Sosa. They strung him up and bet him.

However, that said, Sosa is a great ambassador of baseball. Fromw what I hear, he is an great person. He really seems to care about the fans and he does a tremendous amount off the field for the community he grew up in.

People make mistakes, though.
_______
Smile =)
* bt krav magas kitten THE FUCK UP
<bt> Eat Kung Jew, bitch.

[ Parent ]

duxup comes clean (4.70 / 10) (#129)
by duxup on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 01:58:20 PM EST

I have to come clean, at times I use a corked mouse.

I swear I only do it to impress my coworkers.

But when I'm on K5, I use a totally normal mouse.

Well at least (3.00 / 1) (#183)
by mcgrew on Mon Jun 09, 2003 at 03:45:11 PM EST

You don't use an alumanum mouse like the kiddies use!

"The entire neocon movement is dedicated to revoking mcgrew's posting priviliges. This is why we went to war with Iraq." -LilDebbie
[ Parent ]

Corked bats don't really help... (4.20 / 5) (#130)
by skim123 on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 02:16:39 PM EST

At least so say the laws of physics, or one man's interpretation of them. From Sosa cheated, but don't look down upon him:
For another (more important) thing, there's very little evidence that corking a bat actually helps.

Yes, you read that correctly. In his seminal book, The Physics of Baseball, Robert Adair devotes three pages to corked bats, and concludes,

The characteristics of any specific baseball bat can be changed by drilling an axial hole in the end of the bat and filling the hole with some light, inactive, extraneous material. The modified bat differs from the original bat by its lighter weight and smaller moment of inertia. Bats drilled out in this way are excluded from play under the Official Baseball Rules. But the properties of such modified bats can be reproduced by a legal bat with the same "feel" and hitting characteristics.
What's more, Adair suggests that while lightening the bat will result in slightly greater bat speed, this effect is largely (completely?) balanced by the smaller amount of inertia, and thus the ball won't travel as far as it might otherwise have. Which is to say, corking the bat doesn't really make any difference.
http://espn.go.com/mlb/columns/neyer_rob/1563170.html

Money is in some respects like fire; it is a very excellent servant but a terrible master.
PT Barnum


Sweet spot (3.00 / 1) (#162)
by lb008d on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 12:04:10 PM EST

I was thinking of this as well when reading this article - what advantage could corking a bat have? Perhaps corking the bat allows the hitter to use a bat with a larger hitting surface area (sweet spot) and a lower weight.

I've played raquetball for about 15 years now and can attest to the drastic improvements that can be made with a larger sweet spot and lower weight. It's just easier to hit the ball harder. Same thing goes with golf, which is why driver heads have been getting bigger and bigger over the years (427cc is the max allowed currently, I think).

[ Parent ]

because as we all know (2.00 / 3) (#137)
by tralfamadore on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 03:03:08 PM EST

baseball has such a shining reputation anyway. this corked bat thing could really hurt baseball's spit shine.

Erm... (3.75 / 4) (#138)
by gidds on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 03:28:54 PM EST

[fx: several minutes of staring blankly at the article]

Erm... this is about baseball, right?

Okay, I don't blame you for my complete and wilful ignorance of all things sport-related. However, you could have a) included just a little explanation for those who aren't U.S. citizens and so haven't grown up with the game every day of their lives. And b), how on earth does this count as `culture'???

Andy/

It's culture because: (4.00 / 4) (#140)
by sophacles on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 04:37:13 PM EST

In the US, baseball is a large part of our culture. Even people who don't like or follow sports understand the basic concept and vocabulary.  It is hard to grow up in this country without knowing that.  Terms such as strike out, (and the 3 strikes concept), home run, and batting 1000, even step up, are all baseball terms that have been broadened to become part of the language and culture.


[ Parent ]
Yes, but which is `this' country? (3.00 / 1) (#165)
by gidds on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 02:19:43 PM EST

I thought it was obvious from my comment that I'm not a USian. Baseball might well be a large part of your culture, but I didn't grow up in your country.

(Though that doesn't mean I like the sport in my country any more... :)

Not getting at you particularly, but I find it sad that a tool which should be doing so much to break down the barriers of locality and culture seems instead to be mainly enforcing the One True Culture, and obliterating all else...

Andy/
[ Parent ]

I don't see it that way (4.00 / 2) (#179)
by Delirium on Sun Jun 08, 2003 at 01:11:07 AM EST

True, this particular article is about something that's only a major part of culture in the US, Canada, Japan, and Cuba. But there's been an article on cricket, something that's only a major part of culture in the UK and the former British colonies. There's a little bit of everything here, I think.

[ Parent ]
Okay (3.00 / 1) (#180)
by gidds on Sun Jun 08, 2003 at 08:36:26 PM EST

Didn't the cricket article make its locality clearer nearer the top? Anyway, you're right that Kuro5hin is relatively cosmopolitan. I was thinking more of the internet generally, and certain other popular web sites in particular (*ahem* /. *ahem*)...

(BTW, would this be an opportune moment for a blatant plug of a little utility I've just put up on my web site which converts American spellings to British ones?)

Andy/
[ Parent ]

sectioning (3.75 / 4) (#144)
by jjayson on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 05:25:36 PM EST

I tried to put it in the sports section. That failed for obvious reasons. What section and topic would you have put it under?

Also, about giving an introduction to baseball. When the cricket article came through the queue, it wasn't asked nearly as much to put in some form of intro.

Besides, it really would have been hard to fit in this piece. It doesn't fit anywhere.
_______
Smile =)
* bt krav magas kitten THE FUCK UP
<bt> Eat Kung Jew, bitch.

[ Parent ]

Once again... (3.00 / 6) (#139)
by DJBongHit on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 04:11:38 PM EST

... baseball players prove themselves to be overpaid pussies with no regard for sportsmanship. Wake me when football season starts... at least they earn their salaries.

And I'm talking about real football, not soccer, you damn limeys.

~DJBongHit

--
GNU GPL: Free as in herpes.

wait, shouldn't football involve the foot? (3.75 / 4) (#147)
by shrubbery on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 08:10:23 PM EST

Frankly, watching Arsenal vs. Valencia is 10x more exciting than huge guys run into other every play.

[ Parent ]
This argument is hopeless (3.25 / 3) (#151)
by DJBongHit on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 09:17:02 PM EST

I refuse to argue with you people on football vs. soccer. It's like arguing with a beligerent employee who doesn't listen to rhyme or reason, but at least I can fire them.

~DJBongHit

--
GNU GPL: Free as in herpes.

[ Parent ]
you're right... (3.50 / 2) (#152)
by psxndc on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 10:21:20 PM EST

Yeah, football players are so much better than baseball. Literally 1 in 4 football players has a criminal record and as for "earning" their salary vs basbeall players, football players play what, 13 games at 1 a week? Baseball players play 162 at 1 almost every day. I'm not saying they deserve the salary a lot of them get, but spare me the "Football is so great, baseball sucks BS"

psxndc

[ Parent ]

I love baseball, but: (3.00 / 1) (#161)
by Control Group on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 11:56:18 AM EST

Football has become more fun to watch recently. It's main advantage? Every year, every team has a shot of being good (by which I mean getting into the playoffs). Even the godawful Bengals could be good next year. "Worst to first" happens every couple seasons in football.

Contrast baseball. If you're a Brewers fan, you know—not just think, know—that your team isn't going to be playing in October. League parity is a joke in baseball.

Not to mention that, though football players' salaries are certainly high, the superstars in football don't make anywhere near as much as the superstars in baseball (I challenge you to find a 10-year $225 million contract in football). Not to mention that football doesn't have guaranteed contracts. That alone makes a huge difference.

I've almost come to like football more than baseball, and that's why. Competition is more fun to watch than a sport where one team can win more than 25% of all the championships in a given century. How many Braves/Yankees series have there been?

Oh, and it's 16 games, plus pre- and post-season.

***
"Oh, nothing. It just looks like a simple Kung-Fu Swedish Rastafarian Helldemon."
[ Parent ]

Silly American (2.25 / 3) (#166)
by ZanThrax on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 07:27:35 PM EST

Four downs are for pussies. We only use three, and we still punt far, far less than you do. Why? Because 2 and 3 yard plays are considered almost as bad as loosing the ball.
Our balls are bigger, our fields are bigger, and while our linemen are smaller, they're athletes instead of big stacks of fat.

There is no spoon, there never was a spoon, and there never will be a spoon.
[ Parent ]

HEY, GET BACK TO WORK (3.00 / 1) (#178)
by FuriousXGeorge on Sun Jun 08, 2003 at 12:07:03 AM EST

nt.

--
-- FIELDISM NOW!
[ Parent ]

Too many rules... (3.50 / 4) (#142)
by FattMattP on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 05:19:53 PM EST

... McClelland, citing rule 6.06(D) ...
This is why sports aren't much fun anymore. Too many damn rules.

So let me get this straight (3.00 / 8) (#143)
by AmberEyes on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 05:21:23 PM EST

A silly waste of time has a player who cheats at it, and a bunch of people who sit around wasting their time watching said waste of time are surprised.

Interesting!(@^#$!

-AmberEyes


"But you [AmberEyes] have never admitted defeat your entire life, so why should you start now. It seems the only perfect human being since Jesus Christ himself is in our presence." -my Uncle Dean
Said like a true idiot (1.50 / 6) (#145)
by jjayson on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 06:02:41 PM EST

But I have come to expect that of you. It is only natural that you would have some aversion to sports.
_______
Smile =)
* bt krav magas kitten THE FUCK UP
<bt> Eat Kung Jew, bitch.

[ Parent ]
Geesch (3.00 / 1) (#174)
by AmberEyes on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 05:03:29 AM EST

Who corked in your Wheaties this morning?

-AmberEyes


"But you [AmberEyes] have never admitted defeat your entire life, so why should you start now. It seems the only perfect human being since Jesus Christ himself is in our presence." -my Uncle Dean
[ Parent ]
Amazingly... (3.00 / 1) (#175)
by jjayson on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 05:08:53 AM EST

I would have said the same thing about your initial post. Don't act like you have some sort of high ground to criticize from.
_______
Smile =)
* bt krav magas kitten THE FUCK UP
<bt> Eat Kung Jew, bitch.

[ Parent ]
One needs no high ground (3.66 / 2) (#176)
by AmberEyes on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 06:44:41 AM EST

To think baseball is stupid, sir.

Or are we not allowed to have opinions on K5 anymore? I get so confused sometimes, what with being called a troll or people thinking I think I'm on higher ground for having differing opinions on topics.

-AmberEyes


"But you [AmberEyes] have never admitted defeat your entire life, so why should you start now. It seems the only perfect human being since Jesus Christ himself is in our presence." -my Uncle Dean
[ Parent ]
I've been looking for a definition of irony (3.50 / 3) (#160)
by Control Group on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 11:32:30 AM EST

And I think I've found it: criticizing people for wasting time by posting on k5. Brilliant.

***
"Oh, nothing. It just looks like a simple Kung-Fu Swedish Rastafarian Helldemon."
[ Parent ]
Thank you :D (3.00 / 1) (#177)
by AmberEyes on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 06:45:29 AM EST

You get a 5 for intelligence and humor.

-AmberEyes


"But you [AmberEyes] have never admitted defeat your entire life, so why should you start now. It seems the only perfect human being since Jesus Christ himself is in our presence." -my Uncle Dean
[ Parent ]
No, no - thank YOU (3.00 / 1) (#181)
by Control Group on Mon Jun 09, 2003 at 09:19:15 AM EST

Now, if only the good drduck would agree with you. ;)

***
"Oh, nothing. It just looks like a simple Kung-Fu Swedish Rastafarian Helldemon."
[ Parent ]
How to tell whether corked bats have any effect... (1.75 / 3) (#150)
by mjfgates on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 09:13:51 PM EST

So, if you break Sammy Sosa's left leg with a legal, solid bat, and you break his right leg with a corked bat, which leg hurts more?

So he used a corked bat... (2.00 / 3) (#153)
by jabber on Thu Jun 05, 2003 at 10:40:09 PM EST

But did he inhale?

[TINK5C] |"Is K5 my kapusta intellectual teddy bear?"| "Yes"

A few questions (2.75 / 3) (#155)
by Philosofique on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 02:01:01 AM EST

Sosa's excuse for his corked bat was that he used it during batting practice to give the fans a show and picked it up by mistake before heading to the plate. I just might buy that, but it raises some questions. First, isn't the point of batting practice to get the feel for hitting a real ball with a real bat in a non-game setting to develop technique? If there is such a difference in hitting with a corked bat, a much-debated subject in itself, why use it during batting practice? Sammy says it's to woo and wow the fans. Maybe he's spent a little too much time wowing the fans and not improving his swing as he's currently batting .282, his lowest average since batting .251 in 1997. The second question I have is whether or not he could have picked up the bat by mistake. The process of corking a bat, according to a special aired on ESPN, rarely drops the weight of the bat more than an ounce or two. I'm not sure I could distinguish the difference of a couple ounces without a scale. However, according to former pitcher and "Nasty Boy" Rob Dibble on the Dan Patrick Show on ESPNRadio, a batter is so familiar with his bats that he can readily distinguish their subtle differences. Coming from a pitcher, I'd imagine the effect to be even greater among players who get more batting practice, especially if this bat is used there as Sosa says it is. Further, wouldn't it be risky to not have some sort of identifying marking on this bat to prevent just such an incident? Maybe Sammy didn't because it was never intended to be among the regular bats and he didn't notice the different feel (if there is one) upon picking up the bat before heading out of the dugout. All of this is possible. Also possible, it seems, is that a slumping player, a virtually guaranteed Hall of Famer (another subject open to debate, especially following this) was looking for a way to get back some swagger. Coming off the disabled list for toe problems and playing poorly (by his own standards) following being struck by a pitch to the head in April, I believe it is just as possible that a pressure to perform at a currently unattainable level may have led Sammy to use a bat that he believed would help reach that level. I doubt anyone but Sammy will ever know for sure, but the physical evidence (his 76 clean bats and the bats in the Hall of Fame) certainly adds some credibility to his story. Of course, the controversy belongs to the fans and the sportswriters. What would we talk about otherwise, peace in the Middle East? Sports are supposed to be entertainment. I must say, this entire issue is nothing if not entertaining.

A few answers (3.25 / 3) (#158)
by jjayson on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 02:39:59 AM EST

Pre-game BP is little more than a warmup: jog around a little, make funny hats, hit a few balls, and find your chew (or seeds). I doubt anybody takes it too seriously.

SportsCenter aired some film that showed in the cup at the business end of the bat, there was a distinctive 'C' that presummably stood for corked.
_______
Smile =)
* bt krav magas kitten THE FUCK UP
<bt> Eat Kung Jew, bitch.

[ Parent ]

C is for...? (4.00 / 2) (#163)
by Philosofique on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 12:45:06 PM EST

Again citing Rob Dibble, a number of Sammy's bats have a "C" on them, including one given to Dibble by Sammy himself. Considering that Sosa plays for the Cubs, I'd be willing to float a guess that this letter could stand for that as none of these other bats has been found to contain cork. However, I would think he might notice that his bat had a "C" on it, especially if it stood for corked.

This just in...Major League Baseball has suspended Sosa for eight games, consistent with its previous disciplinary actions against players caught with doctored bats. Hopefully, this will close the debates and let Sammy and the MLB lick some wounds a bit.

[ Parent ]

Has anybody noticed... (3.50 / 3) (#164)
by Ta bu shi da yu on Fri Jun 06, 2003 at 01:43:58 PM EST

...that when you post a comment or a story (in "Auto Format" mode) with an "a href=" link that has an ampersand in it, the ampersand gets coverted into &amp?

Yours humbly,
Ta bù shì dà yú

P.S. do you know how hard it is to figure out how to post a comment with the word "&amp" in it in "Auto Format"?

---
AdTIה"the think tank that didn't".
ה

This is relevant (4.33 / 6) (#168)
by Ta bu shi da yu on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 01:36:47 AM EST

drduck may not have liked it (and has hence given me a 1), but if he had bothered clicking on the story links he would have noticed that one of the links
was http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/030604/168/4ajen.html, and has now changed to
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&;u=/030604/168/4ajen.html.

Yours humbly,
Ta bù shì dà yú

---
AdTIה"the think tank that didn't".
ה
[ Parent ]

Nice. (nt) (4.50 / 6) (#169)
by Ta bu shi da yu on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 01:42:28 AM EST



---
AdTIה"the think tank that didn't".
ה
[ Parent ]
drduck... (4.50 / 8) (#170)
by Ta bu shi da yu on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 02:41:28 AM EST

...I hope you never actually post a comment. You might risk becoming a trusted user and nobody wants that!

Yours humbly,
Ta bù shì dà yú

---
AdTIה"the think tank that didn't".
ה
[ Parent ]

Doh! (4.42 / 7) (#171)
by Ta bu shi da yu on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 02:58:01 AM EST

drduck, I think I nearly got you mad enough to post a comment. Which is cool cause I'm now a trusted user and I'd have to make sure that you got an appropriate comment ranking.

Mind you, with the way I'm getting modded in this thread, my trusted user status is going to die very soon now.

Yours humbly,
Ta bù shì dà yú


---
AdTIה"the think tank that didn't".
ה
[ Parent ]

Doh! (4.50 / 8) (#172)
by Ta bu shi da yu on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 03:05:33 AM EST

drduck, I think I nearly got you mad enough (again) to post a comment. Which is cool cause I'm now a trusted user and I'd have to make sure that you got an appropriate comment ranking.

Mind you, with the way I'm getting modded in this thread, my trusted user status is going to die very soon now.

Yours humbly,
Ta bù shì dà yú

---
AdTIה"the think tank that didn't".
ה
[ Parent ]

Sir, this has been an enjoyable conversation. (4.50 / 8) (#173)
by Ta bu shi da yu on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 03:09:20 AM EST

I have appreciated the mental sparring. Keep up the good work!

Yours humbly,
Ta bù shì dà yú

---
AdTIה"the think tank that didn't".
ה
[ Parent ]

facts: (3.00 / 1) (#167)
by rmg on Sat Jun 07, 2003 at 12:42:40 AM EST

no matter how you twist things, no matter how you argue it this way or that, this article points to one immutable fact: sammy sosa corked his own bat. some of you may be able to excuse this in your minds with some sort of cock and bull story about batting practice or some lame physical argument, this or that, but i cannot allow the integrity of this sport to be compromised. that is why i cannot deny the following simple truth: sammy sosa corked his own bat.

_____ intellectual tiddlywinks

Guilty unless proven innocent (3.00 / 2) (#182)
by mcgrew on Mon Jun 09, 2003 at 03:35:36 PM EST

As a Cardinals fan, the Cubs are, of course, sworn enemies. Fucking losers, nobody has greater faith than a Cubs fan. The team hasn't been in the world series since WWII, and hasn't WON the series since 1908.

However, I'm on Sammy's side here. Give the poor guy the benefit of the doubt. Out of seventy bats they find ONE that has cork in it?

From the way the media plays it you'd think all his bats were corked, that the tragedy of Sosa overshadowed Shoeless Joe Jackson (another Chicago icon, only that time it was the Black Socks).

Baseball has always had its scandals, and this is one of the least scandalous. It takes some of the heat away from the biggest scandal, which is the obscene profits reaped by the owners, playing in stadiums paid for by taxpayers, and charging obscene prices to the fans. THAT is baseball's biggest scandal of its entire history!

In fact, it is organized sport's scandal, not just baseball.

Support your minor league teams!

"The entire neocon movement is dedicated to revoking mcgrew's posting priviliges. This is why we went to war with Iraq." -LilDebbie

Not surprising they don't find other corked bats. (3.00 / 1) (#185)
by jjayson on Mon Jun 09, 2003 at 05:59:27 PM EST

After your the first corked bat breaks, it's not like you are going to need a replacement.
--
"Fuck off, preferably with a bullet, if you can find one that's willing to defile itself by being in your head for a split second." - Parent ]
Cork and Dagger | 185 comments (100 topical, 85 editorial, 1 hidden)
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