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[P]
The Multiple Heteronyms of One Poet

By Queenie in Culture
Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 11:20:05 PM EST
Tags: Culture (all tags)
Culture

Fernando Pessoa was a mastermind born in the late 1800s who fooled entire nations and important personalities into a web of fantasy and art using conventional newspapers and magazines to create a world of imaginary people, circumstances and places. His intricate web was revealed to us 50 years after his death, when his sister donated a chest with over 27 thousand documents written by him. Perhaps it would be more accurate to say that these were written by more than seventy heteronyms he created, who were capable of producing not only poems but critical works, philosophical tracts, novels, plays, horoscopes, letters and interviews.

Heteronyms: a concept stronger than pseudonyms, they were literary alter egos with intricate imaginary lives of their own.


Fernando Antonio Nogueira Pessoa was born in 1888 in Lisbon and raised in Durban, South Africa, where his stepfather was the Portuguese consul. Returning to Portugal at the age of 17 he attempted a career in the arts with poems in English to no success. In 1914 three different subpersonae (heteronyms) emerged from his imagination. As a child, Pessoa had held long dialogs with imaginary individuals, whom he not only heard, but saw and named. Perhaps these individuals transcended the gap of sanity and became real poets with sharply differentiated biographies and styles. Their names: Alberto Caeiro, Alvaro dos Campos, and Ricardo Reis.

These heteronyms became famous writers with lives and circumstances of their own. The social pages of newspapers and magazines followed their tracks and published their life happenings, despite their reclusive nature or the fact that some of them lived overseas. This was made possible because Pessoa worked at, and at a time, even owned some of these publications. Thus, he was able to make his subpersonae real through the use of printed media, very much like people do it on the internet nowadays.

However, different from today's individuals with multiple electronic personalities, his heteronyms consumed his entire life and being. On a letter he wrote to a friend he confesses the creation of his first and most important heteronym:

" I wrote thirty-odd poems straight off, in a kind of ecstasy whose nature I cannot define. It was the triumphal day of my life, and I shall never be able to have another like it. I started with a title 'The Keeper of Sheep' . And what followed was the apparition of somebody in me, to whom I at once gave the name of Alberto Caeiro. Forgive me the absurdity of the phrase: My master had appeared in me. This was the immediate sensation I felt."

From 1914 until his death in 1935, Pessoa's works were not only published by different journals, magazines and newspapers, but also the media covered literary discussions among the heteronyms. Alberto Caeiro even criticized Pessoa's own poems and writings (Pessoa also wrote under his own name for a period of time). The Death of the some of these writers were mourned and some of the heteronyms created poems in honor of the gone ones. Even a Nobel prize of literature, Jose Saramago dedicated one of his best novels to one of Pessoa's heteronyms.

It is impossible to describe in this article the details of all heteronyms created by Pessoa. Fernando was a poet who refused to be himself. He was a poet of the overlapping layers of consciousness, of the many faces of identity that refuse to be unified under one rubric. Self, in Pessoa, was always in tension with Other. In his own words " I fitted it all into moulds of reality. I graded their influences, recognized their friendship, heat, inside me, their discussions and divergences of criteria, and in all this it seemed to me that I, the creator of it all, was the least thing there. It is if it all happened independently of me. And it is if it still happens like that ..."

Pessoa towards the end sublimated his own genius in the creation of heteronyms, imaginary poets possessing distinct influences and phrases, grammar and style. " To create I have destroyed myself ... I'm the empty stage where various actors act out various plays. I am a secret orchestra whose instruments strum and bang inside me. I only know myself as the symphony".

Caeiro, Campos, Reis and the real Pessoa had the most amount of publications and followers. Later in 1982, Pessoa started gaining contemporary fame around the world with the surge of Bernardo Soares, another Heteronym who wrote the Book of Disquiet . This book was published for the first time and translated into several different languages in the early 1980's, becoming one of Pessoa's most admired works.

It is impossible to talk about Pessoa without mentioning the lives of these famous personae. They were as much a part of Pessoa as himself.

Alberto Caeiro: Both Alvaro dos Campos and Ricardo Reis considered Caeiro a master writer. They both confessed that Caeiro's thoughts influenced their work. Alberto was a shepperd who lived outside Lisbon, agnostic who avoided the city and crowds, who lived barefoot in contact with nature and peace. Caeiro was what Pessoa longed to be and could not, he was "the Master."

Ricardo Reis was a poet of Sad Epicureanism, master of highly wrought, metaphysical and neoclassical odes. He was born in Porto and educated by Jesuits. He was a doctor by profession and monarchist by conviction. Reis sought exile in Brazil after the proclamation of the first Portuguese Republic in 1919. Antonio Tabucchi, one of the writer's foremost critics and translators, believes Reis to have died peacefully in exile at the end of 1935. Novelist Jose Saramago, however, speculated that Reis died in Lisbon one year later under mysterious circumstances, unwittingly entangled in the revolts which spilled over from the Spanish Civil war in Lisbon. Reis was the nearest that Pessoa could come to being Caeiro.

Alvaro dos Campos was born in the city of Taviras and was a naval engineer in Glasgow who travelled widely before settling in Lisbon and founding the avant-garde magazine Orfeu. His writings proclaimed the advent of a perfect and mathematical humanity. Impressed by the force and ambition of Campos' works, Mario de Sa Carneiro, ventured that Campos' poetry would outlast his own. Campos did Pessoa's travelling for him.

Bernardo Soares was a book-keeper who lived a humble life in Lisbon which book was only discovered in 1982. Soares was perhaps a close image of the darkest side of Pessoa.

Through the creation of these heteronyms, Pessoa (which means `person' in Portuguese) expressed contradicting ideas about futurism, occultism, fascism, paganism, free love and existentialism. He believed that a man cannot possibly live and fully understand life by being only one person, but it takes to live simultaneous ones to achieve this higher understanding. Obscure in life, he is now the engine of a substantial academic and literary industry in his native country, as well as the subject of heated debate on the internet as to his textuality, intertextuality, sexuality and meta -meaning .

If you would like to learn more about Fernando Pessoa:

www.disquiet.com

www.chass.utoronto.ca/~phorta/

www.lsi.usp.br/art/pessoa/

pintopc.home.cern.ch/pintopc/www/FPessoa/FPessoa.html

www.kirjasto.sci.fi/pessoa.htm

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Poll
have you heard of Fernando Pessoa?
o Yes 18%
o No 56%
o Hmmmm ... 3%
o Nope 21%

Votes: 87
Results | Other Polls

Related Links
o 'The Keeper of Sheep'
o Book of Disquiet
o www.disqui et.com
o www.chass. utoronto.ca/~phorta/
o www.lsi.us p.br/art/pessoa/
o pintopc.ho me.cern.ch/pintopc/www/FPessoa/FPessoa.html
o www.kirjas to.sci.fi/pessoa.htm
o Also by Queenie


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The Multiple Heteronyms of One Poet | 86 comments (46 topical, 40 editorial, 0 hidden)
wow, great article! (3.50 / 4) (#5)
by speek on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 04:02:05 PM EST

So, does this mean there were a lot fewer (real) portuguese authors than originally believed?

--
al queda is kicking themsleves for not knowing about the levees

Gosh! (none / 0) (#6)
by Queenie on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 04:08:18 PM EST

I am so happy you liked it to the point of using a "wow". And yes ... there were fewer real authors.
________________________________________________ ... :) ...
[ Parent ]
One of the greatest poets of all times (4.50 / 2) (#17)
by Pac on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 04:25:23 PM EST

I think Pessoa may be the greatest poet of the Portuguese language ever, far better than Camoes and even better than the great Brazilian poets of the last century (Manoel Bandeira, Mario de Andrade and Carlos Drummond de Andrade, mainly). And I am Brazilian, mind you.

Pessoa's best poems are obviously in Portuguese, but some of you may like to know he wrote a fair share of (good) poems in English.

Evolution doesn't take prisoners


I agree with you (none / 0) (#20)
by Queenie on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 04:29:59 PM EST

I lived in Brazil for many, many years and liked brazilian writers, but once I got to know Pessoa, he blew me mind away! Thanks!
________________________________________________ ... :) ...
[ Parent ]
There are runner-ups, though (5.00 / 1) (#41)
by Pac on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 05:01:11 PM EST

Although not a poet, Brazilian writer Guimarães Rosa is superb. Unfortunately his masterpiece, Grande Sertão:Veredas is probably unreadable for any non-native Portuguese speaker (and for most Portuguese native speakers, too - think Joyce in ancient Celtic) and hardly possible to translate without losing most of its meaning.

Portuguese romancist and 1998 Nobel Prize winner José Saramago is also a master of the language and his work is far more accessible (and easier to translate, so reading it in English won't lose you too much)

Evolution doesn't take prisoners


[ Parent ]
What aspect is untranslatable? (none / 0) (#83)
by day on Fri Oct 24, 2003 at 09:24:22 AM EST

I've heard that that is a great one, from someone who read an english translation. Devil to Pay in the Backlands IIRC.

The translation is out of print and I haven't yet got a copy. But i wonder what you see as hard to translate.

Is it just the rural dialect? And if so, is that really the most interesting aspect of the book?
--
babelguides.com << world literature in translation >>
[ Parent ]

Nice article (3.40 / 5) (#22)
by fae on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 04:32:03 PM EST

But I think when I go crazy, I'll be a mad scientist first, and then develop multiple personalities -- in a sense.

-- fae: but an atom in the great mass of humanity
From the Author - Can I cancel and Submit again .. (2.50 / 2) (#30)
by Queenie on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 04:44:34 PM EST

... Tomorrow? with all typos and spaces fixed?
________________________________________________ ... :) ...
don't tell us (none / 0) (#33)
by tranx on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 04:49:36 PM EST

this is for the 9/11 thing...

for the typos: I've seen worse (much worse), and anyway, you already mailed the editors.

"World War III is a guerrilla information war, with no division between military and civilian participation." -- Marshall McLuhan
[ Parent ]

Yes, I mailed them ... (none / 0) (#35)
by Queenie on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 04:52:12 PM EST

and no - not a 9/11 thing ... but now that it was mentioned, I should have submitted this tomorrow to make sure it was not related to 9/11 at all, not even the submission date.
________________________________________________ ... :) ...
[ Parent ]
look (none / 0) (#39)
by tranx on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 04:58:54 PM EST

we're all sorry for what happened, but do I have to say that life must go on? Consider your good work a tribute to those who were there.

"World War III is a guerrilla information war, with no division between military and civilian participation." -- Marshall McLuhan
[ Parent ]

lol .. ok, I shall do that! (none / 0) (#40)
by Queenie on Thu Sep 11, 2003 at 05:00:24 PM EST

(but ... the ones that where there? Which ones? and Where? :)
________________________________________________ ... :) ...
[ Parent ]
Hmm (4.00 / 2) (#51)
by spacejack on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 12:25:14 AM EST

However, different from today's individuals with multiple electronic personalities, his heteronyms consumed his entire life and being.

How's that different from today?

Heh. Anyway, interesting article. BTW has anyone heard of this guy?

Wow ... (5.00 / 1) (#62)
by Queenie on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 09:44:23 AM EST

I am going to buy some spare bicycle tires right now, they will ne worth tons of money in about 15 years!
________________________________________________ ... :) ...
[ Parent ]
sure (none / 0) (#69)
by grant7 on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 06:48:01 PM EST

I wouldn't follow that worldline too closely, myself... and would offer the advice to anyone who asks not to follow it either.

there is a bit of speculation that this fellow accomplished the performance referred to as John Titor, although I don't know why

while figuring out who some of the other personalities heavily involved in the discussion are seems intriguing, I think the process itself is actually quite intriguing (perhaps not so much for some who have posted rather bent-out-of-shape responses) – much more interesting than the story itself, anyway

maybe it is true, why rule it out... but why latch onto it? as a hoax it is top notch: as has been pointed out it can never be truly proven or disproven without acknowledgement or beyond-a-reasonable-doubt investigation, for which I hope it will never be voted worthy (too late? :). I like the copyrighted material efforts and people who seem to take the issues seriously but aren't stressing about it with a rational assumption about its possibility (note: whether JT is what he says he is or not - what he said/says may or may not happen).

I thought that "carrying ones own water" came from Dune.

[ Parent ]
well it was a good read (none / 0) (#74)
by majik on Sat Sep 13, 2003 at 09:38:05 PM EST

but... if you look for taxes while searching the postings from the grandparent's link, theres a contradiction. In one place he says no taxes, in the other he says there is. I believe one is Dec 2000, the other in Jan or Feb. Regardless of hoax, the comments about being knowledgeable about firearms, basic survival, first aid, and other emergency plans etc.. are still good no matter what the future holds.
Funky fried chickens - they're what's for dinner
[ Parent ]
Great (3.66 / 3) (#52)
by Pseudonym on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 12:46:32 AM EST

Now someone is going to grab the name "Heteronym". Sigh.



sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f(q{sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f});
What makes you think that? (4.50 / 4) (#53)
by heteronym on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 02:09:08 AM EST

Well, you're pretty up yourself if you think someone will register a name just to annoy (or amuse) you, my friend. Pretty big ego you've got there for a bloke with no name...
 
-----
"When someone agrees with me, I always feel I must be wrong." --Oscar Wilde
[ Parent ]
Careful... (5.00 / 3) (#54)
by Pseudonym on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 02:11:57 AM EST

...or people will think you're my troll account.



sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f(q{sub f{($f)=@_;print"$f(q{$f});";}f});
[ Parent ]
LOL! (5.00 / 1) (#55)
by heteronym on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 02:20:21 AM EST

You WISH I was your troll account. If that were the case, when you wanted me to stop nagging or just be quiet so you can watch some television show, you could just log out.
 
-----
"When someone agrees with me, I always feel I must be wrong." --Oscar Wilde
[ Parent ]
Stop talking to yourself! (4.50 / 2) (#56)
by Ta bu shi da yu on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 04:03:43 AM EST

It's creepy!

Yours humbly,
Ta bù shì dà yú

---
AdTIה"the think tank that didn't".
ה
[ Parent ]

What about me? (5.00 / 2) (#59)
by Homonym on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 05:49:28 AM EST

Will people think I'm your trawling account?

[ Parent ]
You mean (5.00 / 1) (#61)
by Scrymarch on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 08:27:35 AM EST

You're not his strolling account?

[ Parent ]
You forgot the english heteronyms (3.66 / 3) (#58)
by jneves on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 05:25:48 AM EST

Me, like most portuguese people, learned about the portuguese heteronyms of Fernando Pessoa. What I learned recently was that he had english heteronyms.

For the english-reading people wanting to try some of Pessoa's genius can read Alexander Search and search for others.

Copyright note: Pessoa's works were affected by the retroactive 20-year copyright extension in Portugal.

How did that copyright thing work? (nt) (none / 0) (#78)
by Kuranes on Tue Sep 16, 2003 at 09:49:15 AM EST




Gentlemen, Chicolini here may talk like an idiot, and look like an idiot, but don't let that fool you: he really is an idiot.
[ Parent ]
Smoke and mirrors (4.00 / 4) (#60)
by rafael on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 07:28:49 AM EST

Pessoa ought to be a character invented by Jorge Luis Borges.

I thought the exact same thing... (3.00 / 1) (#64)
by cr8dle2grave on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 12:48:52 PM EST

...when I first read this article.

---
Unity of mankind means: No escape for anyone anywhere. - Milan Kundera


[ Parent ]
Which Pessoa? (5.00 / 2) (#70)
by jneves on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 08:22:48 PM EST

I'm assuming you said that has a funny remark, but Pessoa is complex enough that, when studying him, people talk of two Pessoas: the poet/writer and the heteronym. The first refers to the real person who did all the work and the heteronyms. The second to the heteronym that signed has Fernando Pessoa

[ Parent ]
And All America Has to Offer is Phil Hendrie :-( (3.00 / 1) (#63)
by tbc on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 11:09:07 AM EST

www.philhendrieshow.com

the mechanics of multiple personalities (4.00 / 3) (#65)
by krkrbt on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 01:18:42 PM EST

It seems that today's mainstream body of knowledge doesn't offer much in the way of understanding the hows & whys of multiple personalities.  However, my reading of Robert Monroe's three books has given me an understanding of how multiple personalities can emerge.  (I recommend reading Far Journeys before Ultimate Journey.  A little bit of reading on the internet on the subject of "out of body experience" can suffice as a replacement for the first book, Journeys Out Of The Body)  

In a nutshell, it goes something like this:  The Monroe Institute's affirmation begins with, "I am more than my physical body. Because I am more than physical matter, I can perceive that which is greater than the physical world."  What this means is that we humans are conciousnesses first, and physical automatons second.  Robert labels what we experience as physical time-space a "compressed learning system" used to advance our level of conciousness.  So, a conciousness chooses it's entry point, experiences birth, lives out a life, and at death of the physical body, fully phases out of physical time-space.

One problem is that "life as a human is addicting".  The vast majority of humans don't accomplish everything they wanted to do in their last incarnation - so we come back, again and again.  Every time back, we develop a new personality.  In this interview of Robert Monroe, Bob says that he's aware of over 2000 different lives that he's lived.  

Part of the agreement for entry into the earth-life system is a temporary "blanking" of all previous knowledge of other existence.  This is necessary for the compressed learning system to achieve maximum effect.  But this blanking does not seem to be 100% effective - there are reports of children having knowledge of previous lives.  Mostly they learn to shut up about these shorts of things, and don't talk about them by the time they're teens...  (B&N/borders tend to stock a book or two on this phenomena)

something interesting that I've read:  birthmarks can corespond to trauma sustained at death in your previous life.  Bullet holes, sword wounds, burn wounds, etc...  

Another manifestation of this phenomena is multiple personalities..

What's cool about Monroe's approach to this area of experience is that it does not require belief.  Relax, have the experience (OBE, etc), evaluate.  [I've had some mild confirmatory experience that the OBE experience is valid, but for the most part what I write here is composed of my belief that Robert was onto something.]  

[OT] This is not new... look at Kardec (4.00 / 1) (#71)
by cribeiro on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 09:06:18 PM EST

This is slightly offtopic but it is interesting anyway. There are lots of works - some books, and entire religions and beliefs - that defend similar ideas. Some religions, for instance, defend that eternity of the soul, with multiple lives in different bodies; in other words, we die, but our spirit lives on to inhabit other body later.

Here in Brazil, "Spiritism", as it is called here, is a very influential and respected religion that advocates exactly this, professed by millions of people. Spiritists believe that the soul is eternal, and that we must keep re-incarnating in order to get more experience; to learn, and to become better souls. The basis of Spiritism were written on the 19th century by a Frenchman that used the name of "Allan Kardec"; a name that he himself referred to one of its previous lifes as a celtic druid.

For a religion, Spiritism is highly scientific and well structured. Kardec devised a series of experiments to certify that the the communications that he received from spiritual beings were reliable; he would check several messages about the same subject, examining all the answers before accepting the communication as true. He was a very good organizator of all this material, that ended up as the basis for what is known today as the Kardec's codification of the Spiritist doctrine.

In short, Kardec's works are very good and comprehensive, but unfortunately not widely known outside Brazil (despite the fact that during the 19 century there were some influential Kardec followers living on the US and France). But for some reason, the religion found a good home in Brazil, where it does persist being professed today.

[ Parent ]

Slgithly OT? (none / 0) (#72)
by Vesperto on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 11:06:23 PM EST

You're picking up a good article on a poet do disseminate your religous beliefs. It's like looking at a tiger and starting to talk about contact lenses 'cos the beast has blue eyes. Geez.

If you disagree post, don't moderate.
[ Parent ]
slightly OT, check (none / 0) (#73)
by khallow on Sat Sep 13, 2003 at 03:35:59 PM EST

Is there a problem with that? I agree with the original poster's assessment. Their post is slightly off-topic.

Stating the obvious since 1969.
[ Parent ]

Not "greater than" the physical world, (5.00 / 2) (#76)
by astraea on Mon Sep 15, 2003 at 04:37:29 PM EST

I would say "other" than the physical world.

Otherwise you run the risk of making this experience appear special, accessible only to a chosen few.

The way the theory goes, all people are more than just their bodies. Therefore, anyone may have such an experience. It becomes a question of habit and practise.

As a member of a multiple system, I remain unconvinced that our multiplicity is in any way paranormal or spiritual. Nor do I believe it has anything to do with reincarnation. Rather, I say it is subjective. We experience ourselves and each other as persons. Neither I nor any of us have ever experienced demonstrable paranormal phenomena, although we're certainly openminded about the possibility that they exist. The only thing of which we are certain is that we each are persons in our own right.

A. Temple

The best book on astral projection is Sylvan Muldoon's Projection of the Astral Body, still available (in a garish cover that belies the sobriety of its contents) from amazon.com.

[ Parent ]

"greater" vs. "other" (none / 0) (#80)
by krkrbt on Sat Sep 20, 2003 at 10:40:54 PM EST

I would say "other" than the physical world.

Robert Monroe chose the wording of his affirmation very carefully, and after some contemplation, I do agree that "greater than the physical world" is a more accurate description for how things work, but only in the sense that "A movie is greater depiction of a persion than a stick-figure" or "3 dimensions are greater than 2".  Every state fulfills a purpose, just as a stick figure is preferable to a movie for marking Male/Female for restrooms.  

Otherwise you run the risk of making this experience appear special, accessible only to a chosen few.

no denigration is intended.  Physical existence fulfills it's purpose quite well, otherwise none of us would be here.  The out of body experience is available to us all, because we're human.  

...

As a member of a multiple system, I remain unconvinced that our multiplicity is in any way paranormal or spiritual. Nor do I believe it has anything to do with reincarnation. Rather, I say it is subjective. We experience ourselves and each other as persons. Neither I nor any of us have ever experienced demonstrable paranormal phenomena, although we're certainly openminded about the possibility that they exist. The only thing of which we are certain is that we each are persons in our own right.

I looked into your site a little bit, and the concept of a "multiple system" does seem to be quite fascinating.  I will definitely be returning for a more comprehensive reading at some point in the future.  Maybe one of you is an expert in the matters we are discussing here, and you could ask them to come forward & provide some guidance?


A. Temple

The best book on astral projection is Sylvan Muldoon's Projection of the Astral Body, still available (in a garish cover that belies the sobriety of its contents) from amazon.com.

Thank you for the book recomendation.  :)


[ Parent ]

Experts? Hm.... (none / 0) (#85)
by astraea on Wed Apr 07, 2004 at 04:39:04 AM EST

Maybe one of you is an expert in the matters we are discussing here, and you could ask them to come forward & provide some guidance?

Well, Jay studied Spiritualism for a while, and he knows his way around the history and origins of modern beliefs in the supernatural, although as I've said, none of us have any experience with confirmed psychic phenomena, and we don't regard our multiplicity as a paranormal thing. To us, it is completely ordinary.

What I do think is that being multiple -- a thing we've been told is impossible -- we're aware that we should take what others say is real or unreal with several large grains of salt.

As far as Pessoa, we've not read any of his writing, and want to. What's the best translation?

A. Temple

[ Parent ]

Please keep belief and science in their corners/nt (none / 0) (#77)
by Kuranes on Tue Sep 16, 2003 at 09:42:40 AM EST




Gentlemen, Chicolini here may talk like an idiot, and look like an idiot, but don't let that fool you: he really is an idiot.
[ Parent ]
what are you trying to say? (none / 0) (#79)
by krkrbt on Sat Sep 20, 2003 at 10:28:18 PM EST

Please keep belief and science in their corners/nt

sorry, but I don't get/see/hear the point that you tried to make here.  Please expand.

As for science, I've heard it described as today's "opiate of the masses".  While the process is valid, the belief many hold in that system compares well with many people's blind faith in religious dogma...

[ Parent ]

Oh... my fault. (none / 0) (#82)
by Kuranes on Wed Sep 24, 2003 at 09:15:47 AM EST

Here you see what can be the results of directly translating sayings from German to English.

I wanted to say that I don't want to discuss science which is meshed too much with religion, because it doesn't word well (at least for me).

I like your comment in the last paragraph, and I fully agree with it. The fashion to call some things "objective" and "proven" to fuck everybody with a different opinion over is horrible. But, as you write, science - in a sense - is a valid tool for life among others (with which I mean, social structures which lack scientific evidence to back them up, but mostly work).


Gentlemen, Chicolini here may talk like an idiot, and look like an idiot, but don't let that fool you: he really is an idiot.
[ Parent ]
Interesting. (4.00 / 2) (#66)
by Vesperto on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 02:29:14 PM EST

I've only read Pessoa in school like any other, i must say i'm not really into poetry; but you made me want to dig into some of his prose work (i think he wrote some).

Er... the city is Tavira, but i wasn't paying attention to the edit queue so what the heck. Good article.

If you disagree post, don't moderate.

Yep Tavira ... ooops! :) (nt) (none / 0) (#67)
by Queenie on Fri Sep 12, 2003 at 03:34:48 PM EST


________________________________________________ ... :) ...
[ Parent ]
Hi... (none / 0) (#75)
by Kmos on Sun Sep 14, 2003 at 10:12:25 AM EST

I like to wrote poems sometimes, and I like a lot of Fernando Pessoa poems, I study him at school this year and I loved what he say in their words to show us some aspects of life, things will never change... Thanks for all great poet!
------------------------------------ - I'm a lost soul in this lost world - http://Kmos.TondelaOnline.com ------------------------------------
[ Parent ]
Wonder where all of that came from. . . (none / 0) (#81)
by Fantastic Lad on Mon Sep 22, 2003 at 11:39:17 AM EST

The best writers channel from elsewhere when they create. But from who and for which side?

All media has the ability to direct cultural behavior toward either positive or negative ends.

I always thought Tolstoy was nuts for condemning music. He complained that music was a horrid thing, that it was false and manipulative. He didn't like how it could make you feel emotions which were not your own. Like I said, I thought he was nuts, (and I believe he was, if the claims of syphilis had any grounding, which I believe they may have.) But, he has a point, though. Who do you borrow your pre-set reactions and personality from? --Think of the movie which 'Spoke' to you when you were growing up, and consider how much of the main character's behavior patterns you have adopted into yourself.

In the search fo role models, we have always turned to fiction. And not so very long ago, when stories were told around fires by elders, and communities were tightly built things, this was fine. But now the corporations have gotten hold of that particular part of our brain.

It takes an enormous amount of effort to pick apart yourself so that you know which parts are you and which parts are collections of stuff from other places.

Be careful what you read, and ask yourself what ends the writer serves in his or her message. --Because, ALL stories carry a message to our subconsciouses.

"Judge the tree by the fruit it bears."

-FL

response (none / 0) (#84)
by rgreenstudio on Sun Dec 07, 2003 at 12:46:35 AM EST

It seems a little bit glib to me to speak of channelling as if it were commonly accepted as part and parcel of a "best writer's" process. Would a not-so-good writer then be merely a faulty channeler? And one must ask "Channeling what?" An archetype? A memory? An autonomous complex? A good spirit? An evil one? Just wondering.

I know the feeling, I think, of being possessed by a project, the sense of the unconscous having been at work...I tend to describe the process in Jungian terms...because Jung especially was hesitant about subjecting the artistic process to technical or psychological analysis.

For those who like Jung:

"...we so often find that works of art, and particularly poetry, are interpreted precisely in this manner, by reducing them to more elementary states. Though the material he works with and its individual treatment can easily be traced back to the poet's personal relations with his parents, this does not enable us to understand his poetry. The same reduction can be made in all sorts of other fields, and not least in the case of pathological disturbances. Neuroses and psychoses are likewise reducible to infantile relations with the parents and so are a man's good and bad habits, peculiarities, passions, interests, and so forth. It can hardly be supposed that all these very different things must have exactly the same explanation, for otherwise we would be driven to the conclusion that they are actually the same thing, If a work of art is explained in the same way as a neurosis, then either the work of art is a neurosis or a neurosis is a work of art. This explanation is all very well as a play on words, but sound common sense rebels against putting a work on the same level as a neurosis...

I'm just a little itchy about explanations of process. I like a good mystery. Sorry for being longwinded here.
rgreenstudio
[ Parent ]

RE (none / 0) (#86)
by lixiangcn on Tue Jun 07, 2005 at 09:43:49 AM EST

But I think when I go crazy, I'll be a mad scientist first, and then develop multiple personalities -- in a sense. -- fae: but an atom in the great mass of humanity Flash geci mobile shouji info info caixin ling.

The Multiple Heteronyms of One Poet | 86 comments (46 topical, 40 editorial, 0 hidden)
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