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Sushi-HOWTO

By gordonjcp in Culture
Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 01:34:33 PM EST
Tags: Food (all tags)
Food

Do you like sushi? Do you hate paying £5 for a tiny little bento box from high-end supermarkets? Do you want to have an anime-and-sushi geekfest but balk at the cost of the food? Sushi is really easy to make, and fairly inexpensive if you're keeping it simple. Read on to find out how you can impress your mates and fill your house with anthropomorphic anime catgirls (well, maybe not) with your very own home-made sushi!


Introduction

Lots of us geeks are well into exotic foods, and Oriental foods seem to feature fairly highly in their diet. I'm going to show you how to make one of my favourites, sushi. There are many different kinds of sushi, each prepared in its own way. I'm going to describe how to make Maki sushi, which is the sushi most readers will be familiar with. The rice will be entirely suitable for other kinds of sushi like nigiri, so feel free to experiment. If you're vegetarian, that's fine - just make the sushi with only vegetables in it. It's even suitable for vegans, if you don't use dairy.

Now, many people think that sushi is all raw fish; this is wrong. Sashimi is raw fish. Sushi is (mainly) sticky rice, seasoned with vinegar. You might put some raw fish in with it, though. We're not going to use raw fish, because choosing good fish is an art form in itself. We're just going to look at "entry level" sushi.

What you'll need

You will need a few things that you may or may not already have lying around your kitchen. Many of these things can be picked up from a well-stocked supermarket, but you're far better getting them from a proper Chinese supermarket. No, I don't know where they are in your area; the telephone directory is your friend.

Equipment

You may already have a lot of this equipment.

  • Sushi rolling mats
  • A pan for cooking rice
  • A mixing bowl large enough to hold the cooked rice
  • A heatproof jug
  • Wooden or plastic spatula - not metal
  • A really sharp knife.

The rolling mats are little bamboo mats, made up of strands of bamboo approximately 3mm thick and 1mm apart. They are flexible along their length, so you can roll up the sushi without it going squint.

When you go to cut the sushi, you need a really sharp knife otherwise you just squash it out of shape. If you end up sawing away at it with a blunt knife it will look terrible and fall to bits. You don't want that.

Ingredients

You will probably need to buy some of these.

  • Sushi Nori - the roasted seaweed outer wrapper
  • Sushi rice - goes really sticky when you cook it
  • Rice wine vinegar - you could use any wine vinegar I suppose
  • Stuff to put in the sushi - experimentation is the key
    • Red and green peppers
    • Flaked tuna
    • Crab sticks
    • Soft cheese (Philadelphia, thick crème freche)
    • Baby corn and mayonnaise
    • Smoked salmon
  • Condiments
    • Pickled Ginger
    • Soy sauce
    • Wasabi

You can buy sushi vinegar already made up. It's surprisingly expensive, compared to ordinary rice wine vinegar. Don't worry, I'll tell you how to make it. Sushi nori usually comes in packs of ten sheets. One coffee-mug of uncooked rice makes about enough for two rolls (roughly).

Getting started

Ok, so you've been shopping, got all the goodies, the temperature-sensitive stuff is in the fridge, and you've sharpened up your best kitchen knife. Good, we're ready to begin.

Rice

The rice is the key to sushi. Sushi restaurants often employ a full-time rice chef, who does nothing but make rice all day. Seriously. If you get the rice wrong your sushi will either go all soggy and horrible, or it will fall to bits. Fortunately, it's fairly easy to make "good enough" sushi rice - cook it like ordinary rice but get it wrong! It's meant to come out all sticky and gooey! Great, how can you fail?

So, to cook the rice put some rice in the pan. I'd say about 1.5 coffee mugs of rice to start with, which will make about enough for three or four sheets. Put about twice as much water in with the rice, bring it to the boil with a lid on, then back it off until it's just simmering. Leave it for 10 to 15 minutes, until the water has nearly all boiled away, but don't let it burn. Once it seems done (it will still be a little wet), turn the heat off and leave it.

While the rice is cooking, make the sushi vinegar. Put some rice wine vinegar in the heat-proof jug (about 25ml will do). Add a teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of sugar. Heat it gently, either in a microwave or by standing it on the lid of the rice pan (if it seems flat enough) once you've got the rice simmering. You could add a tiny dash of soy sauce if you like.

Once the rice has cooled down a bit, turn it out into the mixing bowl. You can gently turn it a couple of times, until it cools a bit more. Now, we need to get the vinegar into the rice. Don't stir it - drag the spatula through the rice in a "cutting" motion, pouring a little of the vinegar in as you go. Once you've done this a couple of times, turn the bowl through 90 degrees and do it some more, at right-angles to the first lot of "cuts". Go back and forth a few times until it's thoroughly mixed. If you stir it, you'll break up the rice grains and it will turn into a particularly nasty porridge-y mess. So, don't stir it, OK?

Fillings

While the rice is cooling you should be preparing your fillings for the sushi. Chop some red and green peppers into thin strips (you won't need much). Slice some crab sticks lengthways, so they roll more easily. You can make a really good tuna filling by thoroughly draining a can of tuna flakes in brine, then squeezing it so all the water comes out. Next, chop up some spring onions, and a small red chilli (add as much as you think you'll like, or leave it out altogether). Mix the tuna, spring onion, chilli, and a pinch of salt in a bowl. If you're going to use baby corn, blanch it now so it's got time to cool. Just plunge it into a pan of boiling water, keep it in there for 30 seconds to 1 minute, and take it back out. Cut them so they are roughly the same thickness along their length (chop off the last 3/4" or so where it tapers to a point).

Rolling your sushi

I will say now, don't expect it to come out anything like the sushi you buy on the first attempt. Like everything else, it takes practice. Even now I still sometimes roll really bad sushi, and it all comes out too loose and falls to bits. I guess I'm not so l337 after all.

The rice

The sushi nori is very dry and papery when you get it. When it gets wet it softens, so it's important to keep your rolling mat and the work surface it's sitting on perfectly dry and free of little stray grains of rice. Lay the rolling mat out flat, with the bamboo strips running across in front of you. Then place a sheet of sushi nori on the mat, shiny side down. Make sure the top and bottom edges are square with the strips of the mat, and that it is more-or-less central. Spread a thin layer (not quite as thick as your finger, maybe 3/8" thick) of rice over a little more than half of the sheet of sushi nori. Get it right up to the sides, and the edge nearest you. Make sure the rice is fairly smooth on top and has a nice straight edge at the top - if it's a wavy line your sushi will be difficult to roll and come out a funny shape.

The filling

Spread some Philadelphia or crème freche on the rice, across the middle leaving about 1/2" from the top and bottom edges clear. Lay some strips of peppers lengthwise up the middle of this. Or use one of the other fillings. I only say to do the soft cheese and peppers filling because it stays together really well when you roll it, especially if you gently press the peppers into the cheese.

The rolling

The great moment! Gently wet the top edge of the sushi nori, all the way across and about 3/4" down. Then lift the edge of the mat nearest to you, and then start to curl it over the rest of the sushi. Once you've got enough of it rolled up, start to squeeze it together into a nice round shape like a fat sausage. Finish off by rolling it right over a couple of times so the wet edge sticks. Smooth it down so it's all sealed. Make a couple more in the same way. If it doesn't work first time, keep trying. If it all goes horribly wrong you can pick the nori off the rice and try rolling it again. Keep at it, you'll get it. Don't forget that if it doesn't really work, you still get to eat the evidence!

Cutting your sushi

I find it's easier to cut the sushi once it's been standing for a few minutes. You can clingfilm it and it will last for a day or so in the fridge before it goes soggy. It's really best made fresh, certainly not more than six hours before you need it.

Get your very sharp knife, and a mug of fairly hot water. Wet the blade so it doesn't stick to the rice. Now, cut the first 1/4" or so off a roll of sushi. Then cut it into sections, somewhere between the width of your index finger and the width of your thumb. Don't cut yourself. Contrary to what many people think, you're less likely to cut yourself with a really sharp knife, because it's far less likely to slip. Lay each piece out on a plate when you've cut it. If you've made rolls with different fillings, you can lay them out in artistic patterns - remember, it's supposed to look good and taste good.

Serving your sushi

Make sure everyone has a little dish of some sort for their soy, wasabi and pickled ginger. You can dip pieces of sushi in a little puddle of soy on your dish, and maybe put a little wasabi on it. Wasabi is very hot, so be careful.

Pickled ginger is for cleansing your palate between different kinds of sushi, or you might just like eating it. If you're using chopsticks, remember to pick things up from communal plates with the fat ends (i.e. the ends that don't go in your mouth!) and try not to drop stuff. Just like rolling the sushi, practice makes perfect.

Sushi is good with beer, although I'd stick to something good and fairly light and lager-y for this. You could also have some dry white wine, although really you should have sake. The problem with sake is that there is just about as complicated a set of rules of sake etiquette as there are for port. Just don't pour yourself sake (it's terribly unlucky, and is thought of much the same way we think of people drinking alone, at home, in the morning), and when someone pours you sake, you should pour them some. Don't let a guest sit with an empty sake cup!

In conclusion...

Well, hopefully that's given you some idea of how you can make sushi yourself. It's immensely satisfying when you get a batch that goes together well, and all the pieces come out with the filling right in the middle, and it all looks really good. For a total outlay of a few pounds, you can make lots of sushi that would cost a fortune in a restaurant. Give it a go, and if you have any real success stories (or horror stories) please let me know!

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Sushi-HOWTO | 161 comments (112 topical, 49 editorial, 1 hidden)
brilliant! (2.00 / 4) (#3)
by the sixth replicant on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 07:10:36 AM EST

reading this while on an Atkins diet sucks big time :)

ciao

Just eat the salmon and crab sticks then (n/t) (none / 0) (#5)
by gordonjcp on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 07:23:19 AM EST


Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Just eat sashimi then (none / 0) (#77)
by Eryximachus on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 03:55:42 PM EST

A lot fish like salmon are very high in fat in taste delicious raw.  

A lot of people don't like sushi either because they don't like the taste of seaweed. Eating sashimi eliminates that concern.

[ Parent ]

salmon (none / 0) (#85)
by Dogun on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:32:40 PM EST

maguro (that's the really red cut of tuna) is much better than salmon. And probably fattier too! Hooray! Plus, you don't have to worry about it being farmed, since tuna are fucking gargantu-fish. Interesting insight on the nori... does that really make people shy away? Is it the taste, or the fact that it's seaweed?

[ Parent ]
I can attest (none / 0) (#161)
by pediddle on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 12:28:09 AM EST

Not me, but my girlfriend won't touch Sushi because she hates the taste of seaweed.

(She also doesn't eat fish (vegetarian), so when she went to Japan for a week she went very hungry!)

[ Parent ]

Call me old-fashionable (2.50 / 10) (#6)
by nkyad on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 07:30:12 AM EST

Baby corn and mayonnaise? Philadelphia cheese? Are we out of our minds? Why not exchange the Wasabi for ketchup too?

You article gets a +1, sir. Your taste, on the other hand...

Don't believe in anything you can't see, smell, touch or at the very least infer from a good particle accelerator run


Yeah, I know, I know... (none / 0) (#7)
by gordonjcp on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 07:42:56 AM EST

I'm trying to reflect what's popular with "mainstream" sushi. I did say it was entry-level...

Actually, the baby corn and mayonnaise is quite nice.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
use whatever you want! (none / 0) (#19)
by JanneM on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 08:59:24 AM EST

Here in Japan, I've seen Maki-zushi with strips of fried chicken, cabbage, and even bacon. Sushi is the rice; nothing says the "traditional" toppings need be used.
---
Trust the Computer. The Computer is your friend.
[ Parent ]
Again (none / 0) (#24)
by nkyad on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 09:23:13 AM EST

My country has the largest Japanese population outside Japan, so our Japanese food is as good as it can be. I know the trend. Lots of Japanese restaurants serve California rolls with many strange things in it. I just happen to dislike it very much... :)

Don't believe in anything you can't see, smell, touch or at the very least infer from a good particle accelerator run


[ Parent ]
A note about the rice (3.00 / 6) (#17)
by JanneM on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 08:55:24 AM EST

A good way to get the rice right is to wash the raw rice (rinse it in water several times - see below), then let it stand wet in the pot for half an hour or so. Add about as much water as you had raw rice, bring to a slow boil then turn off the heat and let simmer and cool for half an hour.

The amount of water sounds very little, but the rice picks up the moisture from the washing and does not actally need all that much water anymore when boiling it.

And about rinsing: it really makes a difference in taste. Put the raw rice in the pan. Pour cold water in, swirl around a little, the quickly empty out the water again through a sieve (so you don't lose your rice down the drain). You'll notice the water being a cloudy gray-brown. Repeat the rinse another few times until the water pretty much clears (four or five times with stirring). Makes for better rice.
---
Trust the Computer. The Computer is your friend.

Ah, yeah... (none / 1) (#25)
by gordonjcp on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 09:30:13 AM EST

Although I suppose I just took rinsing the rice for granted, who cooks rice without rinsing it?
You're right about letting it stand, wet, for a while though.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
I do, that's who (none / 0) (#133)
by pdrap on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 04:33:55 AM EST

My Chinese mother taught me how to cook rice, and she said not to rinse it. It's not sushi rice, but I do make my regular rice without rinsing it. I also never stir my rice when it's cooking.


[ Parent ]
More party-sushi-making advice (3.00 / 7) (#18)
by danharan on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 08:57:54 AM EST

Great article, but mayonnaise and cream cheese in maki-sushi? Ick! ;)

I recommend you increase the quantities by a factor of at least 10 and throw a party. (Practice first, or get some experienced person to help you). Last time my roomates and I had one guests were provided ingredients and rolling mats, shown how to roll and left to their own devices. We're doing it again for Valentine's day- or as my sister puts it "Single Awareness Day".

As for the rice: I suggest you drop by your closest asian grocery store, and ask the staff for assistance. The best glutinous rice for sushi does not cook in the usual fashion- requiring 1.5 times its volume in water instead of 2x, soaking for 20-30 minutes, and cooked relatively fast.

While at the asian grocery, pick up some really cheap deals on 50-packs of Nori and pickled ginger. Ask them about pickled radish- you'll find long white radish that is perfect for maki when cut length-wise. Specifically ask for sushi sauce, rather than your everyday soy sauce.

Other ingredients you should consider, especially if throwing a party:
-sesame seeds
-grated carrot, beet (adds color)
-ripe AVOCADO
-fresh salmon and/or tuna

If you are feeling especially adventurous, find a plastic lunch bag (those with ziploc) that can fit a bamboo rolling mat. Apply rice to the Nori, and sprinkle with sesame, turn it around to add fixings and roll so the rice/sesame is on the outside. Very impressive, and if any anthropomorphic anime catgirls showed up, they will be suitably impressed.

Well, since this was meant as an introduction... (none / 0) (#26)
by gordonjcp on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 09:37:56 AM EST

... I thought it might be better to start small.

I buy rice 25kg at a time from my local Chinese supermarket. The Asian places tend to stock Basmati rice more than sushi rice, and other stuff for making Indian food.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Asian stores (none / 0) (#29)
by danharan on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 09:43:43 AM EST

Yep, quite right. I have the good fortune of living close to a Korean-owned grocery store, which has a wide selection of Korean and Japanese foods. Very yummy! :)

[ Parent ]
Asian can be confusing (none / 2) (#75)
by DodgyGeezer on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 03:39:42 PM EST

I suspect by your "£5" comment in the story that you're in the UK.  "Asian" to most Britons means southern Asian, such as Indian.  A lot of readers here are from N. America where "Asian" typically means eastern or south-eastern Asian.  This is why to you getting Basmati rice in an Asian supermarkey is entirely appropriate, whereas the person who replied started going on about Korea.  Of course, the word "Asian" encompasses all these cultures, it just how the word is used everyday in certain cultures.  As Briton who's lived in N. America for 8 years, I know the confusion that can result.

[ Parent ]
Some interesting side dishes (2.75 / 4) (#23)
by nkyad on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 09:20:01 AM EST

Although a bit expensive (and probably hard to find depending on where you live), fresh Shiitake (washed, cleaned and cut in large pieces) or Shimeji mushrooms cooked (very quickly) on a hot butter and soy sauce mixture are wonderful with sushi.

And if your guests are accquainted with Japanese food, it does not hurt to cut some tuna and salmon into sashimi (naturally you can use many other types of sea creatures here). You will need a very sharp knife and some patience.

Also, do not use smoked salmon as the author suggests. Fresh fish will make a world of difference for both sushi and sashimi.

Don't believe in anything you can't see, smell, touch or at the very least infer from a good particle accelerator run


Smoked salmon... (none / 1) (#27)
by gordonjcp on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 09:39:55 AM EST

... is less scary for sushi newbies.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Well... (none / 0) (#31)
by BJH on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 10:04:35 AM EST

...there's not really any such thing as 'fresh' salmon. If it's not smoked or cooked, then it's been flash-frozen as some point (because of parasites).

--
Roses are red, violets are blue.
I'm schizophrenic, and so am I.
-- Oscar Levant

[ Parent ]
Yes indeed. (none / 0) (#32)
by gordonjcp on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 10:11:07 AM EST

I know quite a few people who work on salmon farms, and they won't eat the stuff.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Unless... (none / 0) (#41)
by CanSpice on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 01:40:21 PM EST

...you catch it yourself, of course.

[ Parent ]
No. (none / 0) (#68)
by JanneM on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 02:07:39 PM EST

Seriously, you do not want to eat fresh salmon. Freeze it well first. In fact, leave uncooked salmon well alone and use it cooked instead.
---
Trust the Computer. The Computer is your friend.
[ Parent ]
Uncooked salmon is just fine (none / 1) (#102)
by Lord of Caustic Soda on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 10:42:08 PM EST

Even your average smoked salmon is hardly anywhere near cooked. The worst you can do to salmon is to overcook it.

[ Parent ]
Well... (none / 0) (#124)
by BJH on Sun Feb 01, 2004 at 03:56:00 AM EST

The point is that any salmon you're likely to get your hands on in the supermarket or whatever, if it's uncooked, has been frozen - so there's no such thing as 'fresh' salmon.
--
Roses are red, violets are blue.
I'm schizophrenic, and so am I.
-- Oscar Levant

[ Parent ]
My understanding (none / 0) (#160)
by NoBeardPete on Fri Jun 18, 2004 at 05:45:04 PM EST

My understanding is that farmed salmon does not have to be flash frozen. Salt-water parasites can't infect people, while fresh-water parasites can. Wild caught salmon may or may not have spent enough time in fresh water to pick up parasites. There's no way to know for sure. So wild caught salmon is flash frozen to temperatures that will kill the parasites.

Farmed salmon, on the other hand, have a paper trail. People know where they have been. They spend their whole lives in their salt-water pens, so there's no way for them to pick up the fresh-water parasites that us humans need to worry about. They can be eaten raw and unfrozen.


Arrr, it be the infamous pirate, No Beard Pete!
[ Parent ]
A previous article on making sushi (3.00 / 10) (#33)
by cbraga on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 10:38:20 AM EST

Is found here: http://www.kuro5hin.org/story/2003/4/1/171344/4974

ESC[78;89;13p ESC[110;121;13p
-1, already been done (and done better) (none / 2) (#34)
by BlackStripe on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 10:44:27 AM EST

thanks for the link. i was debating whether to 0 or -1, leaning toward -1 for lack of links. having looked at the excellent earlier article i'm going to -1 just because it's already been done and done well. peace.

[ Parent ]
Bah... (none / 0) (#139)
by gordonjcp on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 07:50:01 AM EST

I didn't actually remember that article, until someone else mentioned it. Then I found I'd actually posted two comments in it.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
-1, with a heavy heart... (none / 3) (#45)
by gilrain on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 04:11:28 PM EST

Excellent effort, but the previous sushi article is better. This one doesn't really show us anything new. If we had an easier to navigate, searchable archive, this sort of thing wouldn't happen.

-1, Needs title change (1.60 / 5) (#48)
by kobayashi on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 05:04:18 PM EST

Product described bears little resemblence to sushi.

Oh, and if you are going to put Philadelphia on your sushi I dont think you need to bother with the sake-etiquette bit.

The product is fine (none / 1) (#67)
by JanneM on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 02:05:39 PM EST

He's describing perfectly fine maki-zushi; what you'll find in the fresh food section in Japanese supermarkets is no stranger than this (and with not much more seafood than this either).
---
Trust the Computer. The Computer is your friend.
[ Parent ]
+1FP (1.00 / 7) (#49)
by Verbophobe on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 05:51:20 PM EST

I'm all for the promotion of pretentiousness.

Proud member of the Canadian Broadcorping Castration
-1 (1.11 / 9) (#55)
by WetherMan on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 07:27:25 PM EST

makes reference to anime wankers.
---
fluorescent lights make me look like old hot dogs
everybody that downmoded (none / 1) (#126)
by WetherMan on Sun Feb 01, 2004 at 11:19:56 PM EST

this needs to stop being such an anime wanker.
---
fluorescent lights make me look like old hot dogs
[ Parent ]
For fuck's sake, don't post about making sushi. (2.33 / 3) (#56)
by it certainly is on Thu Jan 29, 2004 at 08:01:07 PM EST

You'll stir Ed Slocomb, world's greatest sushi cook EVAR, and wake him from his slumber.

kur0shin.org -- it certainly is

Godwin's law [...] is impossible to violate except with an infinitely long thread that doesn't mention nazis.

wow (none / 0) (#93)
by coryking on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 06:46:41 PM EST

Somebody referenced a sushi place about 4 blocks from were I live. You dont live in west seattle per chance?

[ Parent ]
No. (none / 0) (#99)
by it certainly is on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 09:32:21 PM EST

My arch-nemesis does. Or did. Who knows? It's not like I've ever asked him.

kur0shin.org -- it certainly is

Godwin's law [...] is impossible to violate except with an infinitely long thread that doesn't mention nazis.
[ Parent ]

your arch-nemesis, eh? /nt (none / 0) (#147)
by Battle Troll on Tue Feb 03, 2004 at 11:50:00 AM EST


--
Skarphedinn was carrying the axe with which he had killed Thrainn Sigfusson and which he called 'Battle Troll.'
Njal's Saga, ca 1280 AD
[ Parent ]
Yes, Nathan. (none / 0) (#150)
by it certainly is on Wed Feb 04, 2004 at 09:19:48 AM EST

I've been reading too many comic books and map the reality of human relationships into something more understandable, like supervillians. That's what happens to people who don't believe in god and stuff.

kur0shin.org -- it certainly is

Godwin's law [...] is impossible to violate except with an infinitely long thread that doesn't mention nazis.
[ Parent ]

heh (none / 0) (#151)
by Battle Troll on Wed Feb 04, 2004 at 10:22:34 AM EST

Ever played BattleMaster?
--
Skarphedinn was carrying the axe with which he had killed Thrainn Sigfusson and which he called 'Battle Troll.'
Njal's Saga, ca 1280 AD
[ Parent ]
Would you believe (none / 0) (#152)
by it certainly is on Wed Feb 04, 2004 at 10:42:58 AM EST

that loads of people at my work play that, when they're not surfing Hot Or Not and eBay Motors. This is probably why I don't play it -- and because, unlike them, I am not a "monitoring specialist" and thus actually have work to do.

kur0shin.org -- it certainly is

Godwin's law [...] is impossible to violate except with an infinitely long thread that doesn't mention nazis.
[ Parent ]

heh (none / 0) (#153)
by Battle Troll on Wed Feb 04, 2004 at 11:03:02 AM EST

It's the only game I've ever heard of where you can literally play 5 min./day. It's perfect for me, because I love games but don't have time to play them.
--
Skarphedinn was carrying the axe with which he had killed Thrainn Sigfusson and which he called 'Battle Troll.'
Njal's Saga, ca 1280 AD
[ Parent ]
I shall investigate without prejudice (none / 0) (#155)
by it certainly is on Wed Feb 04, 2004 at 11:09:34 AM EST

in the near future, and inform you of the results.

kur0shin.org -- it certainly is

Godwin's law [...] is impossible to violate except with an infinitely long thread that doesn't mention nazis.
[ Parent ]

it's like e-methadone /nt (none / 0) (#156)
by Battle Troll on Wed Feb 04, 2004 at 11:12:31 AM EST


--
Skarphedinn was carrying the axe with which he had killed Thrainn Sigfusson and which he called 'Battle Troll.'
Njal's Saga, ca 1280 AD
[ Parent ]
btw: (none / 0) (#154)
by Battle Troll on Wed Feb 04, 2004 at 11:03:44 AM EST

HotorNot is a definite symptom of loserdom.
--
Skarphedinn was carrying the axe with which he had killed Thrainn Sigfusson and which he called 'Battle Troll.'
Njal's Saga, ca 1280 AD
[ Parent ]
azuma is better (none / 0) (#94)
by amnesiak on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 06:51:54 PM EST

I don't like the hipster attitude at mashiko, and they cost like twice as much as azuma does.
-amnesiak
[ Parent ]
sir, (none / 0) (#122)
by coryking on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 10:03:49 PM EST

stay off my forums bitch. get your own.

[ Parent ]
Not raw? = Sushi for pussies (2.50 / 2) (#58)
by Psycho Dave on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 02:31:53 AM EST

Not that I'm captain sushi etiquette...I mix my wasabi in my soy sauce like every other white person I know and stick my chopsticks upright in my rice (very bad luck according to the often irrationally superstitious Nihonjin).

But, on the topic of sushi for weak-stomached-gaijin-barbarian-wimps you should at least include the spam musubi--a treat you can pick up in any 7-11 on Oahu, or at the swap meet. Take sushi rice, place a slice of fried spam on it, wrap it nigiri style with a strip of nori, and enjoy!

It's the perfect dish for when you have your fat Otaku buddies over to circle jerk over tentacle rape anime porn.

Well... (none / 1) (#63)
by BJH on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 08:30:13 AM EST

It's not that sticking your chopsticks vertically in your rice is bad luck, as such - it's just that that's how rice is offered to the dead. Not so much 'bad luck' as 'out of place'.
--
Roses are red, violets are blue.
I'm schizophrenic, and so am I.
-- Oscar Levant

[ Parent ]
hm (none / 1) (#66)
by JanneM on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 02:03:42 PM EST

Mixing wasabi into the soy souce is perfectly normal (as far as I know :) ). Sticking chopsticks into the rice is, however, a funeral custom - you would not show up at a party with white shirt and white tie either.
---
Trust the Computer. The Computer is your friend.
[ Parent ]
wasabi in the soy (none / 0) (#115)
by Subtillus on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 02:33:12 PM EST

Is a chinese thing.

You're actually supposed to snort it or apply it liberally to your eyes.

[ Parent ]

Speaking of bad luck (3.00 / 2) (#78)
by Eccles on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 04:53:55 PM EST

Sushi should not be made with four ingredients, as the Japanese phoneme for four and for death are the same (shi?)

Most guests won't notice, of course, but if you do have Japanese visitors you might want to take note.

[ Parent ]

Only spastic K5 readers... (1.81 / 16) (#70)
by OhMyFingG on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 03:07:13 PM EST

would mod this to the FP. How is it that a guide to sushi is a fucking instructional piece on California Rolls. Jesus Christ... Mayo? Smoked Salmon? creme fucking freche? Why not toss a McRib into one.

Next on the K5 front page, "How to be a programmer: All you need is HTML", or "Fix any car: As long it only involves changing a tire"

Anyone who wants to see an example of why this site is slowly dying, look here and understand this is a fucking FP piece...


"What kind of fucking retard are you?" - My Dad
I agree (2.50 / 4) (#81)
by Dogun on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:21:42 PM EST

Freaking americanized sushi. Unlike many great foodstyles out there, it doesn't work very well for sushi. If you want good sushi, for cripes sake stick to fish. Make a california roll in my presence and I'll see to it you don't reproduce. Seriously, what the hell is wrong with people? Yes, it's fish, and yes, it's raw. Get over it. If it's fresh, saltwater fish, you really don't have much to worry about as far as parasites go. It's not yucky, it doesn't smell bad. Hell, my plan for tomorrow is buying a half pound or maguro at my local fish market. I plan to gorge myself before 10am. You know why? Raw fish is the shit, and it's cheaper than you think. If you're just looking for straight sashimi, and you have a place where you can buy sashimi grade fish, get off your ass and find out what you've been missing. If you want tamago, or anything that's going to be troublesome or require some skill, just suck it up, find your local hole-in-the-wall that serves good sushi, isn't trendy or crowded, (Mine closed after the owner died. I was very sad.) and shell out. You won't be disappointed. mmm... maguro.... (*drool*)

[ Parent ]
quick caveat (none / 1) (#83)
by Dogun on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:28:51 PM EST

I recognize that the americanization of sushi has worked its way back to japan, and california rolls and various other shitty attrocities are found there, and that there are people (who shouldn't reproduce, in my humble opinion) who like it. I, however, maintain that these bastard creations are crap and that it's all about the raw fish. And the tamago, which I can't eat, but trust you me, it's the fish. Oh yeah, it's the fish. .... maguro.... *drool*...

[ Parent ]
Don't blame us (none / 0) (#84)
by theElectron on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:30:21 PM EST

It's not Americanized, it's Anglicized (or is that Anglicised) -- note the gratuitous and in-your-face use of the pound.

--
Join the NRA!
[ Parent ]
I *DO* blame us. (none / 1) (#88)
by Dogun on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:45:17 PM EST

Atrocious though this Brittish guy's 'sushi' may be, I maintain that My Fellow Americans are to blame for most of this nonsense, probaby during the early to mid 80's when corporate execufolk wanted to look hip but found the idea of raw fish revolting. Someone out there must know how all this nonsense started... please, enlighten us!

[ Parent ]
It was the americans who opened up japan (none / 0) (#117)
by Subtillus on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 02:47:53 PM EST

For the sake of argument:

Commodore M. Perry came in with big ass gunships in 1853.

This then led to the toppling of the tokugawa and the meiji restoration (arguably) which was really when they started forsaking traditional japanese/chinese culture in favour of western values and industrial notions.

Ultimately everything can be blamed on america, even bastard sushi with cream cheese.

Though I think they're actually very tasty.


[ Parent ]

Not everywhere... (none / 0) (#127)
by Belgand on Sun Feb 01, 2004 at 11:33:44 PM EST

I should state for the record that raw, or even half-way edible fish is nearly impossible to find in Kansas. Even worse is trying to find it in a smallish town, even if it is a college town.

No sushi restaraunt in town, no decent fish in town... it may not be great, but its the best you can get.

I would also like to call attention to the fact that the author mentions that selecting proper fish is an art in and of itself. This is a guide for beginners. While I'm not much a fan of california rolls myself I do recognize that I stand a much better chance at getting one to turn out halfway decent than I do real sushi. Start with a small step and learn the basic elements first. Then learn to select some excellent fish and begin making proper sushi.

[ Parent ]

"Americanized"? Really? (none / 0) (#138)
by gordonjcp on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 07:45:39 AM EST

That's clever...

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Agreed ... (none / 0) (#96)
by Mr.Surly on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 07:39:18 PM EST

http://www.kuro5hin.org/comments/2004/1/29/6203/62644/37#37

[ Parent ]
Wow, I need to read more of the comments... (none / 0) (#98)
by OhMyFingG on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 08:22:30 PM EST

I am a dupe whore, obviously. Thanks for the link.


"What kind of fucking retard are you?" - My Dad
[ Parent ]
S'okay -- it was editorial, thus hidden now. (NT) (none / 0) (#101)
by Mr.Surly on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 10:29:25 PM EST



[ Parent ]
1.5 coffee mugs of rice (none / 2) (#71)
by tricknology2002 on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 03:22:24 PM EST

Um, maybe a measuring cup should have been on that shopping list.

Eek. (none / 2) (#72)
by abracadada on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 03:31:26 PM EST

I certainly wouldn't use "any wine vinegar".  Rice wine vinegar has a lower acidity (4.5%) than other vinegars.

Also, I have heard that sake would not traditionally be served with sushi, as it is considered redundant.

Other ingredients which are good for the "filling" are cucumber, avocado, pickled radish, and fried tofu strips.  I have used habanero in the past, but would not exactly recommend it.
WMBC online freeform/independent radio.

Sake and Sushi (none / 0) (#97)
by sakusha on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 08:17:19 PM EST

You are misinformed. Sake is often served with sushi, in fact, "sake to sushi" is such a common Japanese phrase that it is often used to mean "a meal."

[ Parent ]
More Sake and Sushi (none / 0) (#112)
by czolgosz on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 12:42:25 PM EST

Anyway... didn't sushi originate as a form of bar snacks?


Why should I let the toad work squat on my life? --Larkin
[ Parent ]
I didn't say it would work well... (none / 0) (#142)
by gordonjcp on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 11:59:37 AM EST

... although that said, I tried it with red wine vinegar (just a tiny bit) and it tasted pretty good. Different, but good.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Soft cheese, mayoniase? (none / 2) (#73)
by Tezcatlipoca on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 03:35:18 PM EST

Is it not enough that the US has destroyed Mexican cuisine with the aberration that is Tex-Mex????

Now you want to also destroy the honourable Japanese tradition?

What is next? Fois grass with ketchup? Goulash soup low in calories? Apple struddel with chocolate sauce for Atkins diet???

Nooooooo!!!

Might is right
Freedom? Which freedom?

Tex-Mex is only... (none / 0) (#105)
by mikelist on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 05:40:02 AM EST

...an aberration when it gets imported to non-border states. Non-Mexicans typically like some but not all Mexican food, that's how Tex-Mex became a regional anomaly. Now, calling Paul Prudhomme a cajun chef is an aberration.

[ Parent ]
huh? (none / 0) (#119)
by wobblie on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 07:42:12 PM EST

Paul Prudhomme is a cajun, and a cajun chef, and you'd better be from south louisiana talking shit like that. Yeah, he does some positively weird things (deep frying merlitons? eww), but overall he is one of the best chefs in the world, and a great guy to boot.

[ Parent ]
Mexican ... (none / 0) (#120)
by wobblie on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 07:49:08 PM EST

Mexican cusine is doing just fine without American's knowledge of it. Americans can think Mexican food is all tacos and enchildas and burritos all they want ... Of course, mexican street food is damn good stuff. But there's much, much more ...

It is odd though, that Americans are so completely unaware of how elevated Mexican cusine is; given that Mexico is right next door. It is truly a world class cusine, on par with Italian, French, Creole and Chinese cooking. And like all world class cusines, it is rooted in strong rustic traditions. Our loss (well not mine).

[ Parent ]

Aberration? (none / 0) (#132)
by Edziak on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 02:45:09 AM EST

True Tex-mex was around before Texas was part of America. Its part of Tejano culture witch is what happened when mexicans interacted with english speaking settlers. And Mexican culture comes from Spanish and indiginous culture. Spanish culture comes from European and Muslim culture. But I guess you think thats some sort of crime against nature right?

[ Parent ]
The US can do what it damn well likes... (none / 1) (#137)
by gordonjcp on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 07:44:30 AM EST

... I don't live there and I don't intend going there.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Also, the author doesn't sound American.... (nt) (none / 0) (#159)
by MattGWU on Thu Feb 05, 2004 at 11:34:58 AM EST



[ Parent ]
Please learn the difference between sushi and maki (none / 2) (#74)
by blacksqr on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 03:37:13 PM EST

You've described how to make maki.  Sushi, as  you may have heard, involves raw fish, which is placed on top of rice balls.

There are different kinds of sushi (none / 1) (#76)
by Eryximachus on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 03:52:47 PM EST

makizushi is just one KIND of sushi. The kind of sushi you are describing is actually called nigirizushi.  

Why don't you <a href=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sushi>read up on it</a>

[ Parent ]

Smartass (1.00 / 5) (#82)
by theElectron on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:27:37 PM EST

Why don't you learn how to use HTML in comments.

--
Join the NRA!
[ Parent ]
Oh no he di'nt! (none / 2) (#87)
by Dogun on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:39:36 PM EST

Done been bitched! I'm with you brother. Sushi without raw fish (or egg. I'll let tamago be considered sushi) is just pointless. It's very much like a hamburger, minus the tasty center and plus a quarter pounder of fecies. (And I don't mean veggieburgers. I eat veggieburgers. Some of them can be quite decent. Other ones... well, lets just say quarter pounder of fecies.)

[ Parent ]
Oh yes i did! (none / 1) (#89)
by op00to on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:49:05 PM EST

Learn how to spell FECES before you get all upptiy. Fool.

[ Parent ]
fecies (none / 2) (#91)
by Dogun on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 06:09:37 PM EST

And you'll notice I also don't know how to spell "didn't". And that period was after the double apostrophe. And I just called a quotation mark a double apostrophe. And that's probably mispelled to. And each one of those sentences began with an 'and'. Is any of this getting thru 2 u? ur pal, cuddles

[ Parent ]
I know how to use HTML comments (none / 0) (#125)
by Eryximachus on Sun Feb 01, 2004 at 02:47:15 PM EST

but I didn't know you had to SPECIFY HTML formatted. That is a feature that makes this site suck balls.  

Why don't you tell me where I made a mistake in formatting such simple HTML

[ Parent ]

Bzzzzt (none / 0) (#149)
by kmself on Tue Feb 03, 2004 at 12:57:16 PM EST

"Sushi" is, literally, "vinegared rice". Su == vinegar, "shi" == rice. Or vice versa.

How you form your rolls, and what you put in them, are variants on the theme. The core though is the rice and seasoned vinegar.

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.
[ Parent ]

vegetarian fillings... (none / 1) (#79)
by danfeder on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 04:54:05 PM EST

This is a decent intro to the basic technique of making sushi (havn't read the older article) but the list of fillings has some pretty important omissions. Fresh carrots, avocados and cucumbers are going to be a lot better in there than baby corn, peppers and canned tuna. These are more standard fare in vegi roles at US sushi joints (although I doubt there's much avocado at the elite sushi bars in Osaka). Also, if you live in an area with a sizable Asian immigrant population (ie, most major cities in the English-speaking world) you can probably find daikon radish (looks like a giant white carrot) at the gorcery store; that's also good fresh. Soaking strips of daikon in rice vinagar for a while aproximates oshinko ("pickled radish"), another vegi maki staple.

A tip - getting your hands wet will make working with the rice a lot easier. I keep a bowl of water in front of me and dip my hands into it after making each roll.

Oh yeah, you can do an "inside out" roll by spreading plastic wrap over your map and spreadikng a THIN layer of rice on it first. Roll it real tight and it should come out pretty good.

Mmmm, now I'm hungry.....

Cream cheese... (none / 1) (#80)
by splitpeasoup on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:11:57 PM EST

...is pretty common in sushi restaurants, so I don't see why everyone is jumping on the author. Tastes pretty good, too.

I'm vegetarian, and I love sushi with cream cheese, or daikon, or cucumber. No doubt that bothers some of you. Well, too bad.

-SPS

"Be the change you wish to see in the world." - Gandhi

right. (none / 0) (#123)
by it on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 10:46:30 PM EST

actually, my absolute favorite kind of sushi is inside-out rolls filled with cucumber, smoked salmon and cream cheese.

it's what brought me back from being convinced that i hate sushi to really enjoying it.

[ Parent ]
this article's (none / 3) (#86)
by tweetsygalore on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 05:33:49 PM EST


making me hungry!  :)

best
C
After each perceived security crisis ended, the United States has remorsefully realised that the abrogation of civil liberties was unnecessary. But it has proven unable to prevent itself from repeating the error when the next crisis comes along. --- Justice William Brennan

cream cheese in sushi... Crime Against Humanity? (2.50 / 6) (#90)
by Dogun on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 06:00:16 PM EST

You were in a dark restaurant, seated around a giant sushi bar, listening to 'trendy' people trying to impress their 'friends' over dinner. Somewhere deep inside, you wished for a gun. Somewhere deeper, you wanted to use it on yourself. There you were, and your order of tuna rolls had just arrived - you had wanted to start with something conservative, because you hadn't been there before. Also, the restaurant was overly populated by pompous assholes, and even though you were a pompous asshole yourself, you knew that most of *those* pompous assholes liked to eat at crappy restaurants. In fact, the restaurant was so dark that you didn't notice the sickly sheen next to the meager quantity of tuna placed inside the rolls. Any moment now... Too late. Your mouth closed on a nasty ass clump of cream cheese that some asshole decided was appropriate for sushi. Angry, you order nothing more, pay your bill, and go home, leaving 5 untouched rolls on your tray and wishing that the 6th hadn't had a brief stay in your mouth. Cream cheese in sushi... honeslty, who can say that that is not a Crime Against Humanity?

Likely... (none / 0) (#95)
by J T MacLeod on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 07:32:50 PM EST

Anyone who has had cream cheese gyoza.

Mmmmmmm.

[ Parent ]

Oooooh, there's a thought. (none / 0) (#136)
by gordonjcp on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 07:41:52 AM EST

Right, I'm off to go and cook some.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Lighten up, dude. (none / 0) (#131)
by Edziak on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 02:21:17 AM EST

Do you take off your shoes when you go to the sushi bar? Do you pour drinks for your freinds and vice versa? If not, then you're not following Japanese etiquette, witch isn't much diferent than making sushi with non-traditional ingredients.

Just because its not authentic dosn't mean you can't enjoy it. I happen to think cream chese goes pretty well with smoked salmon or unagi.

Its not like the Japanese are averse to adapting other people's cuisine. Look at tempura.

[ Parent ]

Meh... (none / 0) (#143)
by gordonjcp on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 12:02:31 PM EST

I come from a part of the world where you can get just about anything deep-fried in batter or made into pakora. No, the Deep-Fried Mars Bar isn't a myth (but it is fairly uncommon).

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
mayonaise (none / 0) (#92)
by MonkeyMan on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 06:19:12 PM EST

Mayonaise is not all that rare. I am familiar with Chopped Scallop (Scallops and Flying Fish Roe mixed with mayonaise). It's pretty tasty. And the linked menue has lots of other things containing mayo.

Sushi is about fish (none / 0) (#100)
by StephenThompson on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 10:21:15 PM EST

Yes, technically, you can have sushi with no fish in it.  But typically you would be eating rolls with fish in it along with the non-fish types; and yes, typically, some of that fish would be raw.

The deal is this: good sushi is delicious.  You say you don't like raw fish?  Well, I tell you, neither did I.  It took some learning to fish that misconception. Now while there is a little bit of "aquiring the taste", there is a hell of a lot more of "getting sushi that isn't rotten".

No kidding ,for years I thought I hated sushi.  I would try it here and there and everytime I ended up gagging on the grossest gooey mess of stinky dead fish and seaweed.  I know you've heard it before, but it is so true:  if you don't like Sushi odds are you have never had good sushi.  

Good sushi does not "taste like fish". If you can smell the fish, its bad.  Good Sushi is not gooey.  The fish should be firm.  

Also, about half the fish you get in sushi is actually cooked.  Shrimp [ebi], eel [unagi], soft shell crab [spider] and several others are cooked and are a good place to start when you are trying sushi for the first time.  The place not to start is "tuna salad" style, or anything with mayonasie or cream cheese.  The problem isnt so much that its not authentic, its that it is not "new terrain"; you are not expanding your culinary horizons one bit.  Tuna salad and rice with some soy sauce is just not very good, though it may be familiar!

I love sashimi. (none / 0) (#135)
by gordonjcp on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 07:39:55 AM EST

I just didn't want to tell people to make it at home, because, well, it's raw fish and if you get it wrong you will make yourself (and everyone else who eats it) ill. It's not an easy thing to do properly.

I make sushi with raw, cooked, and smoked fish all the time for my girlfriend and I, but I would urge some caution if you're trying to make it for the first time. This article really was aimed at people who may have eaten sushi before and wanted to try making it, so I left out the difficult stuff.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Good points, one quibble (none / 0) (#145)
by Fricka on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 06:49:03 PM EST

Good sushi isn't necessarily firm. The best sushi I've had was melt-in-your-mouth yellow tail. One of the other guests I was with, a jet setter business man type who had lived in Japan for months, said it was the best sushi he'd ever had.

The original poster said "We're not going to use raw fish, because choosing good fish is an art form in itself." I was relieved he said that because I'd hate to see folks buying fish for sushi, most people don't even know how to pick out fresh fish for "regular" forms of cooking.

By the way, I'm also on the "no cream cheese" bandwagon. Yech, that's not sushi.
----------- Support my Internet and Gaming Hobbies: http://www.OffLineTshirts.com
[ Parent ]

Tip #1 - Get a rice cooker (none / 0) (#103)
by Lord of Caustic Soda on Fri Jan 30, 2004 at 10:48:41 PM EST

Just put rice and water in, hit the switch and forget.

I have to cringe at the cream cheese in sushi idea as well.

Oriental food still count as exotic? I'd like to know which culninary hinterland the author of this guide is living in.

"oriental" (none / 0) (#118)
by Subtillus on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 02:57:46 PM EST

To call something "oriental" is considered hick-town unclutured where I'm from but I'm not going to call you on it.

This is because historically it has referred to such a freaking diverse region that it really doesn't make sense. It's also a bit offensive because it lumps up the indian sub continent, East Asia and often the middle east into one ethnic group. Even though each of these  has dozens distinct ethnicities, groups, whatever....

Live and let live I say, these may be exotic to some people.

I have this one friend who won't eat the north americanized chinese food because he thinks it's too spicey. Really the spiciest thing in the food is sugar and maybe a tomato.
The idea of raw fish is something he wouldn't even consider, is he a bumpkin?

maybe... but like i said, who gives a shit right?

[ Parent ]

Cooking rice (none / 0) (#144)
by Vs on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 01:46:05 PM EST

Rice Cooking 101 (for electricity, does NOT apply to gas!):

Give rice and twice the amount of water into a pot at maximum energy with the lid closed. Once it's boiling, turn off the heating and leave on the hot plate with the closed lid. Once all the water is gone, it's ready.

I can't tell you how long this takes as I always start with the rice before the main course and just forget about it once I turned off the plate until I serve it, at which time it's done.

YMMV with ceran cooktops.
--
Where are the immoderate submissions?
[ Parent ]

Ugh (none / 0) (#109)
by jope on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 08:20:51 AM EST

The idea about sushi is the fish - good fish. Expensive fish. If you want Sushi with good fish you are probably better off getting it from a restaurant since it is hard to get the fish at a good price in rather small amounts. Even more so a *variety* of fish.

I beg to differ. (none / 0) (#128)
by Edziak on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 01:54:01 AM EST

Sushi is about the rice. Sashimi is about the fish.

There's plenty of sushi that dosn't have any fish in it at all. Futo maki has tofu and some other vegtables in it. Kappa maki is cucumber. Oshinko maki has a kind of pickle. Kanpyo maki has squash in it.

[ Parent ]

Some better suggestions (none / 0) (#110)
by city light on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 10:49:47 AM EST

Hmm... well I don't know a lot about sushi but I have to say some of your suggestions for what to put inside sound a bit too much like sandwich fillings. Shame you decided not to go into the raw fish side of things as I'd like to know more about that (beyond trying smoked salmon which I guess doesn't really count). For some tasty (perhaps slightly more authentic? but mostly veggy) suggestions how about:
  • Cucumber (cut into strips)
  • Carrot (likewise)
  • Avocado
  • Asparagus
  • Sweet potato
  • Pickled radish (think you buy this as a special thing)
  • Fresh prawns (I believe you call them shrimps... the big tasty ones)
Cucumber with plum sauce was a rather nice random choice last time I had sushi. The big prawns/shrimps are good for nigiri too when they're cut up right (the kind where you get fish ontop of a block of the sticky rice)

Sake (none / 0) (#121)
by tomatoeblue on Sat Jan 31, 2004 at 08:11:11 PM EST

Has anyone tried to use sake in the cooking of the rice for sushi? You cook it in the normal fashion, and during the step (after cooking is done) when you mix it in vinegar and sugar, you add Sake to the rice. The heat will heat up the alcohol, and make it all nice and tasty. Together with the sweet / sourness of regular sushi rice, you will also get a bit of sweetness from the sake, and of course, don't drive after you eat sake sushi!!!

Ginger - how to make it ? (none / 0) (#130)
by Shubin on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 02:13:35 AM EST

Have anyone tried to make Pickled Ginger at home ? It is quite expensive, but raw ginger costs almost nothing.

Not tried it... (none / 0) (#134)
by gordonjcp on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 07:33:30 AM EST

I expect, from the taste, it's salt, sugar and water, with pink ginger soaked in it.

If it's expensive you must be going to the wrong place. At my local Chinese supermarket it's a couple of pounds for a fairly big jar (about the size of a coffee mug), which lasts for ages. It doesn't go off ('cos it's pickled).

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
I've made pickled ginger (none / 0) (#140)
by MonkeyMan on Mon Feb 02, 2004 at 09:57:14 AM EST

I tried buying a 6oz jar of pickled ginger from the market but it was nasty.

So I make my own. Last time it was an 8oz jar filled with vary thinly sliced ginger root (almost a full hand of ginger), 3/4 cup rice wine vinegar, 5 tbs sugar, 3 tsp salt. It took about 10 days before it got pickled enough. Very tasty.

I didn't peel the ginger and no problem. You need a very sharp knife and a good hand to get thin slices.

When I was looking on the net for recipes some recommended blanching the ginger first (that is supposed to make it ready overnight - I found it altered the flavor and made it softer) and in some cases pickling the ginger whole and slicing it after it was pickled.

Mine didn't turn pink. Some places on the net claim that this happens naturally but I suspect food coloring.

[ Parent ]
The Sushi Eating HOWTO (none / 0) (#148)
by ciurana on Tue Feb 03, 2004 at 12:20:52 PM EST

Hello,

A couple of years ago a couple of people asked me "what's the right way to eat sushi?" and I wound up writing something I dubbed The Sushi Eating HOWTO. I think it's a complement to the excellent HOWTO guide for making sushi.

Cheers,

E

Abomination! (none / 0) (#157)
by Virago on Thu Feb 05, 2004 at 12:22:56 AM EST

That is NOT sushi. Where do I begin? Tuna flakes!? Mayonnaise?? Cream cheese?

You sir, are a barbarian to pollute anything resembling sushi with those horrors.

For those who like Unagi (eel) (none / 1) (#158)
by facekhan on Thu Feb 05, 2004 at 01:04:32 AM EST

For those who like Unagi in their maki and sushi (barcued fresh water eel for the uninitiated) you will be surprised to find that at many asian markets it can be bought already cooked and frozen (as all but the most expensive sushi restaurants get it) for as little as $3. An entire fillet of eel for $3 which can be turned into a sushi feast for 2-4 people. The rice costs more than that. Just let it defrost overnight in the fridge and open the package and heat it up in an oven or toaster for a minute or two. Microwave if you have to.

Sushi-HOWTO | 161 comments (112 topical, 49 editorial, 1 hidden)
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