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[P]
Codejack's really hot chili

By codejack in Culture
Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 09:02:31 PM EST
Tags: Food (all tags)
Food

It's winter again, and that means chili time. There's not much better than coming in out of the cold to a good hot (hot!) bowl of chili, preferably served over macaroni with grated cheddar cheese on top. Now, everyone makes chili differently, so of course no one is actually going to follow my recipe exactly, but that's all right. If you want inferior chili, that's your right as an American. Foreigners, you may be out of luck, but then, do you have any business making chili, anyway? This applies to Californians and New Englanders, too.


Let's start with some ingredients:

  • 1 lb. ground beef, 85-90% lean; Too much fat will make the chili greasy, while too little is bad, too.
  • 1 large yellow onion, diced; You can also use white onion, but under no circumstances should you use red or vidalia.
  • 1 can each light red kidney beans and dark red kidney beans.
  • 2 cans diced tomatoes; If you can find them with peppers and chiles, skip the next three items.
  • 2 habanero peppers, finely diced.
  • 2 jalapeno peppers, finely diced.
  • 3 green chiles, diced.
  • 1 can tomato paste.
  • 2 Tbsp chile powder.
  • 1 tsp salt.
  • 1 Tbsp pepper.
  • 2 cups (or more) water.

Combine beans, tomatoes, peppers, chiles, tomato paste, half the chile powder and water in a 3 qt. sauce pan. Stir, cover, and simmer on low/medium heat for 30 minutes to an hour, stirring occasionally.

Cook beef over high heat until brown and drain. Add onion and return to heat. Cook until onion is just translucent and remove from heat. Lightly season with salt, pepper, and chile powder.

Add meat and onions to sauce pan, stir, and let simmer for 3-4 hours, adding water and stirring occasionally. About hour two, add the rest of the chile powder and pepper. For best results, remove from heat, let cool, and refrigerate overnight, then reheat the next day.

Now, this will not be the hottest chili in the world, but it's pretty hot, and I have found that if you get much spicier, it starts to interfere with flavor. If you want less spice, remove 1 each of the habanero and jalapeno peppers. If you want more spice, go find the dreaded Peruvian Death Pepper or the Aji Pinguita de Mono (literally "little monkey dick"), and add them. Compare the spices of different peppers and chiles on The Scoville Scale.

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Poll
Most important chili ingredient?
o Meat 19%
o Beans 22%
o Onion 3%
o Tomato 6%
o Chiles 25%
o Peppers 14%
o Dude, doesn't it just come in a can? (or "I'm from California") 4%
o Peas, barbecue sauce, sugar, or anything else (or "I'm from New England") 5%

Votes: 98
Results | Other Polls

Related Links
o Peruvian Death Pepper
o Aji Pinguita de Mono
o The Scoville Scale
o Also by codejack


Display: Sort:
Codejack's really hot chili | 188 comments (162 topical, 26 editorial, 0 hidden)
Right. (2.00 / 2) (#1)
by Pxtl on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 09:41:54 AM EST

Because only Californians eat crap from a can.

good, but you missed the secret ingredient: (3.00 / 3) (#3)
by Lode Runner on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 10:10:38 AM EST

lard. Just simmer the beans for a few hours in lard or bacon-fat beforehand and you'll have a very nice chili. You'll want to drain most of the fat from the ground beef if you use lard because you don't want too much grease. I promise that people (even children) will eat all the beans if you do this! If you don't want pork in the chili, the fat from unseasoned corned beef or any old beefsteak will do nicely.

IMHO, it's not high concentrations of capsaicin that make a chili good, but rather it's a proper balance of grease and salt!

Also, consider using ground buffalo instead of beef. It's expensive, but it's a very tasty, lean, tender meat.

So... (none / 0) (#4)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 10:30:22 AM EST

Where in New England are you from?


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
I was going to ask. . . (none / 1) (#5)
by Lode Runner on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 10:54:36 AM EST

the same of you, and I figured you were from Mystic, CT or some other place where people've heard of 'jacks.

I've spent less than 100 hours in Texas.

[ Parent ]

What does Texas have to do with it? (2.00 / 2) (#22)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:42:50 PM EST

I'm from Tennessee, not New England; Northerners don't know anything about cooking.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
well, I'm from NC (none / 0) (#46)
by Lode Runner on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 05:22:15 PM EST

and I agree heartily with your assessment. Still, I had some damn fine chili in TX, NM, AZ, and CO; and I maintain that the SW corner of the nation makes that sort of thing much better than the SE corner.

And I've always hated Cajun food.

[ Parent ]

Ah (none / 0) (#50)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 05:48:54 PM EST

I don't dismiss the southwest for their chili-cooking ability, and I'll even accept that their idea of barbecue is tolerable (barbecue is pork, dammit!), but I'll put my chili up against any Texan you care to name.

And I love cajun food.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
Better meat to use... (none / 1) (#103)
by beergut on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:32:52 PM EST

Deer. Beautiful, lean, flavorful meat.

My last batch of chili (18 qts.) sucked up about 12 lbs. of deer meat, 3 lbs. of pork sausage, and 3 lbs. of hamburger, and a 6-lb. chuck roast.

Yum.

i don't see any nanorobots or jet engines or laser holography or orbiting death satellites.
i just see some orangutan throwing code-feces at a computer screen.

-- indubitable
[ Parent ]

WTF (none / 0) (#133)
by Dr Gonzo on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 12:12:05 AM EST

Why would you waste good meat on chili, of all things?

Good meat is meant to be enjoyed largely by itself.

"I felt the warmth spread across my lap as her bladder let loose." - MichaelCrawford
[ Parent ]

I second that (none / 0) (#142)
by rusty on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 01:45:22 AM EST

The best chili I ever had was made with venison.

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
I've got a great recipe for turkey chili (none / 0) (#154)
by porkchop_d_clown on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 02:39:07 PM EST

I'd tell you the secret ingredient, but codejack would hunt me down and kill me out of sheer outrage.

;-P

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]

This is the exact same recipe (none / 0) (#8)
by Sarojin on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 01:29:48 PM EST

that everyone uses. I have a pot of it in my fridge.

Then (none / 0) (#28)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:57:08 PM EST

Why is everyone else bitching? You're from the South, right?


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
I'm Canadian [n/t] (none / 1) (#39)
by Sarojin on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:23:40 PM EST



[ Parent ]
Hmmm (none / 0) (#45)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 05:17:15 PM EST

French-Canadian? That might explain it.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
I don't mean to be a killjoy (1.25 / 4) (#9)
by The Black Ness Monster on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 01:30:33 PM EST

But what's special about this recipe? It's just "OMGROFFLE MAKE SOME CHILI, THEN THROW SOME SPICY SHIT IN IT"

HOWTO: Make a palatable food story (1.62 / 8) (#10)
by mikepence on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 02:00:20 PM EST

This story is about as bland as Betty Crocker, as contrived as Martha Stewart, as gay as the Frugal Gourmet.

The Sushi HOWTO story, that was cool. The coder's guide to coffee, simply delicious.

This just burns me.

Hey, thanks man! (none / 0) (#21)
by gordonjcp on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:42:12 PM EST

Didn't 3 you 'cos that would seem sycophantic.

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
righttttttt (2.50 / 2) (#27)
by balsamic vinigga on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:51:35 PM EST

and parent comment isn't sycophantic at all...

---
Please help fund a Filipino Horror Movie. It's been in limbo since 2007 due to lack of funding. Please donate today!
[ Parent ]
Erm... no. (none / 1) (#11)
by misfit13b on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 02:23:26 PM EST

Who the hell uses such finite measurements to make chili?  If you're measuring the individual ingredients to that extent, you've already lost.  (Not to mention you serve it over pasta.  Goddamn Cincinatti style.)

Plus, the tomatoes and other vegetables (what, no green pepper?) provide more than enough water, making adding any just plain nonsensical.  Are you sure you're not just trying to make soup?

When not baking... (3.00 / 3) (#12)
by pwhysall on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 02:32:14 PM EST

...I use the following measurement of quantity and time: "enough".

Baking requires precision.
--
Peter
K5 Editors
I'm going to wager that the story keeps getting dumped because it is a steaming pile of badly formatted fool-meme.
CheeseBurgerBrown
[ Parent ]

No no no (none / 0) (#26)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:45:48 PM EST

You need the water so it doesn't dry out as it simmers; You're talking 4 hours, minimum, so alot of the water boils off.

As for fine measurements, after you've made it enough times, you figure it out.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
I just made a batch last week. (none / 1) (#29)
by misfit13b on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:59:32 PM EST

Simmered for six and a half hours without getting anywhere close to drying out.  How?  You put a lid on it, leaving it just a little open.  Retains all of that wasted heat as well as the water.

Also, please tell me you're draining and rinsing those canned beans before you throw them in.

[ Parent ]

Of course (none / 1) (#32)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:05:30 PM EST

I see I did forget that part in the recipe ;o


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
And you insult us New Englanders? (none / 0) (#34)
by misfit13b on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:12:18 PM EST

For shame!  ;^)

[ Parent ]
Yep (none / 0) (#36)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:15:41 PM EST

I forget stuff; You guys can't cook.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
If this article is any indication, (3.00 / 5) (#37)
by misfit13b on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:21:59 PM EST

I'd be willing to wager that it's you who needs more practice.  Feel free to enjoy your spaghetti sauce recipe tho.

[ Parent ]
Where's the cumin? (3.00 / 3) (#14)
by rusty on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 02:51:09 PM EST

It's not chili without cumin.

____
Not the real rusty
I'll cumin your chili if you like nt (1.66 / 9) (#17)
by balsamic vinigga on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:03:19 PM EST



---
Please help fund a Filipino Horror Movie. It's been in limbo since 2007 due to lack of funding. Please donate today!
[ Parent ]
way too easy nt (none / 0) (#55)
by Haunting Koan on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 06:46:15 PM EST



[ Parent ]
-1 (none / 0) (#19)
by Uber Banker on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:04:31 PM EST

True

[ Parent ]
Bah! (none / 0) (#24)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:44:15 PM EST

Cumin is for pasta; If you want to serve it over pasta, that's fine (and I do), but the essence of chili is, well, chiles.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
eeew. (none / 0) (#51)
by aphrael on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 06:07:34 PM EST

cumin is for chili and only for chili.

[ Parent ]
or barbecue rub ! n/t (none / 0) (#61)
by minerboy on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 07:57:48 PM EST



[ Parent ]
Er....what about curry? (none / 1) (#101)
by londonalan on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:25:36 PM EST

Can't make curry without cumin.

[ Parent ]
Every curry house on the planet disagrees. (none / 0) (#160)
by pwhysall on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 02:53:06 AM EST


--
Peter
K5 Editors
I'm going to wager that the story keeps getting dumped because it is a steaming pile of badly formatted fool-meme.
CheeseBurgerBrown
[ Parent ]
Cumin with pasta!? What have you been smoking? ;-) (none / 0) (#128)
by Raindoll on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 09:36:58 PM EST



[ Parent ]
Pasta? (none / 1) (#143)
by rusty on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 01:51:35 AM EST

Judging from your comments to this story, you obviously inhabit some totally alternate culinary universe to mine. It seems that they approach close enough at the point of chili that I can recognize your recipe as something that would be similar to what I know as "chili," but in most other ways they diverge wildly.

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
i think the word you're looking for (none / 0) (#47)
by Lode Runner on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 05:24:55 PM EST

is tikka, not chili. But, hey, they're easily confused.

[ Parent ]
most chili powder i've come across (none / 0) (#178)
by the humble USian on Mon Dec 13, 2004 at 08:46:02 PM EST

Has cumin as one of the main ingredients.

[ Parent ]
That sounds O.K. (none / 0) (#15)
by regeya on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 02:56:37 PM EST

That sounds O.K., but it sounds weak.

Also, I like to put crushed red chiles, garlic, cumin, turmeric and paprika in my ground beef while it's cooking. Makes the flavor a bit more consistent and the chile seeds give up what little flavor they have in the cooking process. The turmeric gives the meat a funky yellow tint, but that's O.K. I usually just use a habanero sauce made by El Yucateco [ link ] that claims to be XXXTRA HOT. It's pretty warm; I usually just dribble some of that in my chili. My wife is the byproduct of the union of a northern Illinoisan and Virginian, so her taste in food verges on the extremely bland, which means that I end up putting the essense of Habanero in my own bowl.

Sorry, though; I'm just not impressed by your chili recipe.

[ yokelpunk | kuro5hin diary ]

There's your problem (none / 0) (#31)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:04:36 PM EST

Red chiles don't have enough flavor, that's why you're complaining about their seeds. Try green chiles, and/or jalapeno and habanero peppers. But don't cook them with the beef, they'll get overdone; Cook the beef and onions, and the veggies separately.

As for the sauce, that's all right, I guess, but you lose a lot of the flavor that way. It's still spicy, but not worth the pain.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
Well, here's the thing, and keep it in mind again: (none / 0) (#72)
by regeya on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 01:13:20 AM EST

I'm married to a wuss.

[ yokelpunk | kuro5hin diary ]
[ Parent ]

-2 (none / 1) (#16)
by kingsquab on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 02:57:46 PM EST

A light red -1, and a dark red -1.

there are a lot of different chili recipes... (none / 1) (#38)
by garlic on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:22:58 PM EST

but there are no chili recipes without kidney beans. If it doesn't have kidney beans, it is not chili.

HUSI challenge: post 4 troll diaries on husi without being outed as a Kuron, or having the diaries deleted or moved by admins.
[ Parent ]

Beans? (none / 0) (#175)
by 87C751 on Mon Dec 13, 2004 at 07:02:59 AM EST

Two observations:

Texas chili eschews beans. In many cook-off contests, judges will carry a few pinto beans in their shirt pocket. They disqualify an entrant by tossing a single pinto into the entry, usually accompanied by a look of scathing disgust.

If you are going to use beans (and I do, Texas notwithstanding), use pinto beans. And not the wussy canned variety. Get 'em dry, soak 'em overnight and then add to your chili concoction (which should also include cayenne and chipotle alongside your average dark brown "chili powder").

Garlic is not optional. And chili is not fast food.

My ranting place.
[ Parent ]

Couple of things... (3.00 / 4) (#25)
by gordonjcp on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 03:44:21 PM EST

You need to serve it with *rice*, not pasta
You *really* need to put garlic in it

My girlfriend doesn't like insanely hot chilli, so I tend to use quite a bit of ground ginger in mine. A nice winter warmer. Oh, and sprinkle some smoked paprika on top. Easy to make if you've got hazel wood and an open fire...

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


Where are you from? (none / 0) (#30)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:00:57 PM EST

Rice? With chili?! What madness is this?

And what is with you people and garlic? The spice annihilates the taste, and besides, it has onion.

My wife doesn't like spicy food, either, so I just cook her something else or make two pots.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
rice vs macaroni (none / 0) (#81)
by londonalan on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 05:56:03 AM EST

I've always made my chilli with rice, but I'd be interested to try using macaroni. How should the macaroni be cooked - al dente or until soft? I would definitely use garlic too. But then I'm a vegetarian and thus use soya mince.

[ Parent ]
In this case (none / 0) (#129)
by codejack on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 10:34:34 PM EST

You should cook the macaroni until it's a bit soft; It's just there for texture, really.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
Rice (none / 0) (#83)
by porkchop_d_clown on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 06:47:40 AM EST

I gotta admit, I enjoy eating it this way too. I only ever ate it with pasta once, by mistake, in college. (Long story involving unidentifiable frozen food).

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]
rice (none / 1) (#85)
by dasnake on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 06:56:26 AM EST

What madness is chili with macaroni (I suppose macaroni is some kind of short pasta similiar to maccheroni) ?!

I totally agree with rice, but only basmati rice.

Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita
mi ritrovai per un selva oscura
che` la dritta via era smarrita.
Dante, Divina Commedia, Inferno, I, 1
[ Parent ]
what (none / 0) (#171)
by mpalczew on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 01:52:43 PM EST

A good chili would stand up on it's own.
-- Death to all Fanatics!
[ Parent ]
You forgot the oregano and garlic (none / 0) (#33)
by nlscb on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:09:46 PM EST

2 most important ingredients - try it if you don't believe me.

Comment Search has returned - Like a beaten wife, I am pathetically grateful. - mr strange

For crying out loud (none / 0) (#35)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:14:58 PM EST

For the last time, you can't taste that stuff in proper chili!


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
You can taste when they are not there (none / 1) (#40)
by nlscb on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 04:23:55 PM EST

Kind of like bay leaves - I don't what they taste like, but I know when there sorely lacking.

Comment Search has returned - Like a beaten wife, I am pathetically grateful. - mr strange
[ Parent ]

Entirely different (none / 0) (#43)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 05:14:57 PM EST

I think I see what the problem is, now. Bay leaves, garlic, oregano, etc, are excellent for flavoring sauces. I am not making sauce, I am making chili; In fact, the only reason there is tomato paste in my recipe is for thickening, so I don't have to use corn starch. I don't want to taste the tomato sauce, I want to taste the chili.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
Um... (3.00 / 3) (#74)
by trhurler on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 02:02:43 AM EST

I don't know about anything else, but if you can't taste garlic in chili, you aren't trying hard enough. Or you're using lousy garlic.

--
'God dammit, your posts make me hard.' --LilDebbie

[ Parent ]
chili powder has oregano in it. (n/t) (none / 0) (#123)
by naught on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 06:32:00 PM EST


--
"extension of knowledge is the root of all virtue" -- confucius.
[ Parent ]

True, but not nearly enough [nt] (none / 0) (#176)
by nlscb on Mon Dec 13, 2004 at 08:42:12 AM EST


Comment Search has returned - Like a beaten wife, I am pathetically grateful. - mr strange
[ Parent ]

Works for me. Tragically, however (none / 1) (#48)
by porkchop_d_clown on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 05:32:13 PM EST

My wife and kids seem to think hot peppers are 3v1LL. I have to make two batches, one just for me.

Heh. I do have limits, though. The last time my wife bought me a bunch of habaneros and I pickled them. The results were so hot I could only put 1 or 2 slices on a huge tossed salad or else I'd be gargling orange juice.

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb

Exactly (none / 0) (#49)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 05:42:11 PM EST

That's why I express that it shouldn't be too hot, just hot enough to have flavor. That's why I hate tabasco sauce; It's all spice, no taste.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
Tobasco sauce (none / 0) (#92)
by Psychopath on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 09:59:16 AM EST

There's also the green colored Tobasco sauce which is not that hot, you might want to try that one. In my opinion it has taste too but is still hot.
--
The only antidote to mental suffering is physical pain. -- Karl Marx
[ Parent ]
Several canonical chili errors (3.00 / 2) (#52)
by epepke on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 06:13:23 PM EST

This may be fine for bachelor food, but it contains several canonical chili errors:

  • Beans. I normally don't put beans in chili, but I'm not fanatical about it. If you like beans in your chili, even if you're using canned beans, it is a far, far better thing to do to add them just before serving. For one thing, the beans taste like beans and not like bean-sized chili bits. For another, without the beans, the onion caramelizes much better.
  • Ground Beef. Chili is much better made with chopped beef. If you're lazy, get cube steak.
  • Oregano, garlic, and cumin. Already mentioned. I know that chili powder has garlic powder and cumin in it, but not enough.
  • No sweet spice. Although I think Cincinatti-style chili goes overboard with the cinnamon, a little bit of a sweet spice makes chili seem warmer. Candidates include coriander, celery seed, nutmeg, allspice, and even ground cardamom.

The truth may be out there, but lies are inside your head.--Terry Pratchett


Are you ill? (none / 1) (#56)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 06:47:08 PM EST

No beans, no chili. It just doesn't work. Chopped beef is fine, but cube steak? I don't think so. And enough of the sauce spices; This isn't sauce, it's chili!


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
Ever heard of "Texas Red"? (none / 0) (#138)
by tmoertel on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 12:32:02 AM EST

By all means, do aquaint yourself: Texas Red: The Legend.

Regarding the use of beans:

Beans. These Phaseolus vulgaris varieties taste good with chili; however, they should not be put into a bowl of it. People who add beans to chili because they think it otherwise tastes too rich or is too expensive have found the wrong solution to a simple problem; it is better to use lean, cheap cuts of beef and trim away all visible fat. Chili made with beans can't be reheated, since the beans get sour and turn to mush. But real (no bean) chili requires reheating to reach its final patina of perfection. If your are served beans in your chili, however, you should show forbearance -- simply pick them out and quietly slip them under the table.

Cheers,
Tom

--
My blog | LectroTest

[ Disagree? Reply. ]


[ Parent ]
Ain't Dogmatic, BUT... (none / 0) (#188)
by czolgosz on Wed Jan 12, 2005 at 06:49:26 PM EST

I think the controvery here regarding chili recipes reflects a cultural divide. My people are gringos from New Mexico. For them, as for Texans, chili is a very close cousin of chile colorado or chile verde, and adding beans is an abomination. But I also know that in the Midwest, that which is called chili has very little to do with chile colorado.

But, even discounting the cultural differences and accepting that there is something called chili that contains beans, I would propose a few principles that remain at variance with codejack's recipe: first, that fresh ingredients (both seasoning and tomatoes) really do contibute significantly to the flavor; second, that cumin is an essential ingredient; and finally, that codejack should seriously rethink his opposition to lean cubed beef, which can not only deepen the flavor but also reduce the amount of grease you ingest. And I concur with other posters who spoke well of bison and venison as alternatives to beef. The best damned chili I ever had was made from venison. Goat meat isn't bad either, by the way.

I would also recommend the more extensive use of milder, smoky-flavored chiles for part of the seasoning. I'm looking for delicious flavor, not ringburn. And now that I'm in California, I can no longer maintain the New Mexican assertion that the chile is just another vegetable and not a seasoning at all.


Why should I let the toad work squat on my life? --Larkin
[ Parent ]
varying spectrum. (none / 0) (#170)
by mpalczew on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 01:48:53 PM EST

I think there are many different kinds of chili.  Chili with beans and ground beef isn't even the same thing as chili without beans and with chopped beaf.  They share very little in common, other than spices. Personally I like ground beef with kidney beans.  

As far as spices, you are bound to get a different answer from everyone.  I like alot of allspice and clove. There is alot of different food that can be all called chili the only thing that makes them similar is tomatoes and chile peppers.
-- Death to all Fanatics!
[ Parent ]

Write in: (2.00 / 3) (#53)
by guyjin on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 06:30:00 PM EST

Mushrooms!

And BTW, real chili has no beans.
-- 散弾銃でおうがいして ください

Go away n/t (1.00 / 4) (#57)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 06:47:29 PM EST




Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
what a horrible ingredient for chili. (none / 0) (#126)
by kcidx on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 07:35:46 PM EST

My friends wife puts mushrooms in her chili. I won't eat it.

My mom used to put carrots in her chili, and I still have bad memories of that.

[ Parent ]

I love mushrooms... (none / 1) (#164)
by adamjaskie on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 12:20:08 PM EST

...but NOT in chili.

[ Parent ]
hm, not very collaborative. (2.25 / 4) (#54)
by the ghost of rmg on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 06:32:23 PM EST

in the spirit of the site, i think you should give this another shot, but this time be a little more inclusive? codejack's really hot chili? it's not all about you.

it should be called kuro5hin's really hot chili. this time you can use the edit queue to collect advice on what ingredients and methods to use. then integrate the community's suggestions into a single master recipe.

obviously a few dozen people from all over the world will have come up with a better chili recipe than just one guy thinking to himself. it'll be the ultimate chili. at the chili cookoffs, you'll be the pope of chilitown, but, humbly, you'll tell everyone you couldn't have done it without kuro5hin -- because you couldn't have.


rmg: comments better than yours.

No thanks (none / 0) (#58)
by codejack on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 06:48:21 PM EST

If I wanted it to be Kuro5hin's chili, I would have put it under meta.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
confused (none / 0) (#67)
by LilDebbie on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 11:21:23 PM EST

isn't Jason your extra-troll account? why zero yourself, unless you're trying to mask your extra accounts (an entirely pointless exercise)?

My name is LilDebbie and I have a garden.
- hugin -

[ Parent ]
please. (none / 1) (#68)
by the ghost of rmg on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 11:23:52 PM EST

as if i would have such reverence for eric clapton.


rmg: comments better than yours.
[ Parent ]
-1 too collectivist (nt) (none / 0) (#139)
by Psycho Dave on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 01:00:24 AM EST



[ Parent ]
Very experimental ingredient (3.00 / 3) (#59)
by porkchop_d_clown on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 07:03:04 PM EST

Beer instead of water.

I say "experimental" because the results are gonna vary tremendously depending on the brand. On general hint about cooking with beer though: if you can't drink it warm, don't cook with it. Use something with body to it like a porter or a black and tan.

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb

Experimental? (none / 0) (#60)
by JanneM on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 07:37:57 PM EST

Nothing experimental about it; beer is after all a common ingredient for many stews and roasts.

As you say, you do want to use a dark beer of some sort to give it body. A lager is too watery. Also, don't use just beer (especially if you use a stout) - perhaps stock and beer 50-50 is a good proportion.
---
Trust the Computer. The Computer is your friend.
[ Parent ]

Black and tan? (1.50 / 2) (#73)
by pwhysall on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 01:42:33 AM EST

Ugh.

Half Guinness and half lager.

Ugh.
--
Peter
K5 Editors
I'm going to wager that the story keeps getting dumped because it is a steaming pile of badly formatted fool-meme.
CheeseBurgerBrown
[ Parent ]

Not quite. (none / 1) (#82)
by porkchop_d_clown on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 06:41:25 AM EST

Guiness isn't the only beer in the world.

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]
Excuse me (none / 1) (#141)
by rusty on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 01:42:22 AM EST

Half Guinness and half Bass, my good man. Whoever's putting lager in your black and tan, please do the world a favor and shoot them.

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
Ah, Bass. (none / 0) (#159)
by pwhysall on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 02:44:51 AM EST

“When the bottom falls out of your world, drink Bass, and watch the world fall out of your bottom”

Horrible, mass-produced shite. Much like Guinness in that respect.

Black and tan, howeverso made, is an abomination.
--
Peter
K5 Editors
I'm going to wager that the story keeps getting dumped because it is a steaming pile of badly formatted fool-meme.
CheeseBurgerBrown
[ Parent ]

Beef Carbonnade (none / 0) (#88)
by wiredog on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 08:54:52 AM EST

A Belgian beef stew, made with dark beer instead of red wine.

Wilford Brimley scares my chickens.
Phil the Canuck

[ Parent ]
Word (none / 0) (#93)
by iheartzelda on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 10:19:26 AM EST

I always put a bottle or two of Killian's or delicious New Castle in my chili. I figure the less water, the better. And it is usually on hand on chili making occassions. Pluse I tend to use 50% beef and 50% ground sausage. But hey, I am CRAAAAZAY.

[ Parent ]
Bland, lame chile... (3.00 / 2) (#63)
by TaoJones on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 09:03:12 PM EST

Sounds like tomato flavored bean mush with meat to me.
  • Skip the canned tomato shit. You can't control the salt/acidity of the sauce. Use real tomatoes, a 50/50 blend of Roma and Beef Steak makes a nice base. Blanch, skin, simmer and slowly reduce - a bit of red wine won't hurt.
  • Same on the beans - canned sucks. It takes a bit more time, but taste-wise it's worth the effort. Start with dried beans and learn how to cook them. If you are going to use beans BTW, don't add then until the end.
  • Too much water, use stock instead. Try a vegetable stock with mushroom for the beans. The way you describe it your beans will basically taste like "chile" broth. Beans do have a taste - use it.
  • Oh yeah, skip the "chile" powder bit too. Use tumeric, cummin, cayenne, black pepper, cardamon, ginger, whatever... use fresh spices. Never throw in some generic commercial seasoning.
  • Carmelize your onions and garlic first, then add your meat of choice. You don't want to risk overcooking the meat just to get to the yummy onion sugars. Fresh vidalias are a damn fine choice early on - lots of sugars to carmelize.


First, you should have posted topical. (none / 1) (#64)
by porkchop_d_clown on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 10:32:02 PM EST

Second, you missed codejack's point by a mile.

The way you describe it your beans will basically taste like "chile" broth.

Yeah, that's the point of a recipe like this. It isn't supposed to be a gourmet delight, it's just good stick-to-your-ribs man-food.

Food like you describe does have it's place - it's just not the sort of thing I'd slurp three bowls of while watching football.


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]

Why not? (none / 0) (#140)
by rusty on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 01:40:49 AM EST

Our chili is pretty much like TaoJones describes, although we do use canned diced tomatoes. We usually make a great big pot and freeze most of it in smallish containers, for heating up when we're feeling lazy. It generally ends up being exactly the sort of thing I'd slurp three bowls of while watching football.

Not that I watch football. I will allow that watching football may have some magic property that makes you revolt against food that tastes good. But I doubt it. :-)

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]

Shrug. Different strokes, I suppose. (none / 0) (#153)
by porkchop_d_clown on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 02:37:16 PM EST

I like the flavors blended together; to me that's what makes a great soup or stew - or chili.

I've got a couple of pots on now - similar to codejack's but I used Yuengling Porter instead of water and I made one pot with bell peppers instead of hot peppers (for the wife and kids)

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]

What a douchebag (3.00 / 3) (#75)
by trhurler on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 02:14:36 AM EST

Skip the canned tomato shit. You can't control the salt/acidity of the sauce.
You realize that anything containing habeneros, jalepenos, AND really spicy dry spices is going to completely mask minor variations anyway, right?
Use real tomatoes, a 50/50 blend of Roma and Beef Steak makes a nice base. Blanch, skin, simmer and slowly reduce - a bit of red wine won't hurt.
Yes, because "real" tomatoes have perfectly consistent flavor compared to factory products based on them. Are you on crack?
Same on the beans - canned sucks.
Look, beans are not in chili to be tasted. They're there to fill people up because meat is really fucking expensive by comparison.
The way you describe it your beans will basically taste like "chile" broth. Beans do have a taste - use it.
Find me one person in a thousand who can taste the difference given that we're talking about putting these suckers in one of the strongest flavored foods on the planet. You cannot.
Oh yeah, skip the "chile" powder bit too. Use tumeric, cummin, cayenne, black pepper, cardamon, ginger, whatever... use fresh spices.
And you will most assuredly screw it up. The whole reason chili contests are lame these days is that chili powder is essentially perfect. The days of needing a lifetime of experience to get it right are over.
Carmelize your onions and garlic first, then add your meat of choice.
What kind of idiot carmelizes these in CHILI? Talk about pointless.

Look, proper chili has only three requirements. First, it must have roughly the right flavor. This doesn't have to be exact, because as long as it is reasonably close and you get the other two right, nobody but NOBODY is going to care.

Second, it must have roughly the right texture. People don't all agree on what that texture is, but everyone who has thought about it agrees that texture is important, which is why many chili snobs ban beans. I'm ok with banning beans if you don't mind the resulting cost, otherwise I'm ok with beans.

Third, and most importantly, there must be more of it than those consuming it can finish.

Chili is not French. Get over it.

--
'God dammit, your posts make me hard.' --LilDebbie

[ Parent ]
Err... (none / 0) (#98)
by beergut on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:06:02 PM EST

Oh yeah, skip the "chile" powder bit too. Use tumeric, cummin, cayenne, black pepper, cardamon, ginger, whatever... use fresh spices.
And you will most assuredly screw it up. The whole reason chili contests are lame these days is that chili powder is essentially perfect. The days of needing a lifetime of experience to get it right are over.
Not so. It takes a bit of knowledge, but you can get your chili closer to what you actually want, tastewise, than by using a pre-made spice packet. I used to use McCormick's, but have been rolling my own lately.
What kind of idiot carmelizes these in CHILI? Talk about pointless.
*holds up hand*

Carmelizing onions serves at least one purpose, which is not served by not carmelizing. That purpose is, to convert the starches in an onion to sugars (the process of "carmelizing", as it were,) which adds a bit more body to the flavor of the chili.

Good chili is like good beer. It is a rather involved process, and skipping steps leads not so much to a catastrophe of bad flavor, so much as a wistful reminiscence of a bowl of truly good chili, while wondering what you missed.

Chili is not French. Get over it.
And thank G-d for that. I don't think I'd like it with snails and slugs and shit in it, anyway.

i don't see any nanorobots or jet engines or laser holography or orbiting death satellites.
i just see some orangutan throwing code-feces at a computer screen.

-- indubitable
[ Parent ]

stop making stuff up. (none / 0) (#166)
by mpalczew on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 01:33:07 PM EST

>That purpose is, to convert the starches in an onion to sugars

Couldn't be more wrong.  Carmelization does just that it carmelizes the sugars in an onion.  Only sugars, not starches can be carmelized. Heating up flour(which is basically starch) won't carmelize it.
-- Death to all Fanatics!
[ Parent ]

Not the right powder (none / 0) (#184)
by gte910h on Wed Dec 15, 2004 at 01:06:09 PM EST

>2 Tbsp chile powder

>Oh yeah, skip the "chile" powder bit too. Use
>tumeric, cummin, cayenne, black pepper, cardamon, >ginger, whatever... use fresh spices.

>And you will most assuredly screw it up. The
>whole reason chili contests are lame these days
>is that chili powder is essentially perfect. The
>days of needing a lifetime of experience to get
>it right are over.

>Not so. It takes a bit of knowledge, but you can
>get your chili closer to what you actually want,
>tastewise, than by using a pre-made spice packet.
>I used to use McCormick's, but have been rolling
>my own lately.

You two are both out there. Chile Powder is not the same thing as Chili Powder. Chile Powder is ground pepers, Chili Powder is a spice mix. He asked for the Chile powder, not the Chili Powder:

More:
http://tinyurl.com/696ub

[ Parent ]

ok mr. knowitall (none / 0) (#168)
by mpalczew on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 01:40:17 PM EST

I gotta agree on the tomatoes bit, there are some good canned tomatoes outthere which are very consistant.  Yes growing your own is better but canned tomatoes get picked later than the non-canned and are better for you.  

> Look, beans are not in chili to be tasted. They're there to fill people up because meat is really fucking expensive by comparison.

Sounds like you've never used dry beans.  A good kidney bean in a chili is quite tasty.

> Find me one person in a thousand who can taste the difference given that we're talking about putting these suckers in one of the strongest flavored foods on the planet. You cannot.

The texture of canned beans is quite bad, mostly because you end up cooking them twice.  Canned beans are also more expensive.  And yes I can taste the difference.

> which is why many chili snobs ban beans

I think beans should be in there because they too me anyway taste quite good.

>And you will most assuredly screw it up. The whole reason chili contests are lame these days is that chili powder is essentially perfect. The days of needing a lifetime of experience to get it right are over.

well, it's not that hard to get a good chili powder flavor.  The chili powder in stores is sold so that it sort of appeals to the most people possible.  It's not hard to spice better than some stupid premix.

> What kind of idiot carmelizes these in CHILI? Talk about pointless.

The sweet counteracts the hot of the chiles so you can actually taste the flavor more.  Carmelization makes things taste sweeter.
-- Death to all Fanatics!
[ Parent ]

Aw, man (none / 1) (#105)
by codejack on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:45:14 PM EST

Here we go:
  • Canned tomatoes are better for this application as they are more amenable to absorbing spice; And keep the wine away from me! If you want to make soup, go right ahead.
  • Actually, dried beans are better, but we're already talking a 4-hour process here, and the taste difference, when mixed with spicy peppers, is meaningless.
  • What kind of soup are you making, here?! Stock?! STOCK?! And mushrooms?! When you're done cooking stew, come back and talk about chili.
  • Again, with the soup; Chili powder is chili pepper and a small amount of garlic salt. That's it. Leave the rest of that crap out, other than the black pepper, but then only on the meat and onions.
  • Did you not read the part where I say to use yellow or white onions only? Why? Because they have less sugar to carmelize, so you get bite instead of sweetness; Chili should not be sweet. And garlic is just a waste of time.
When your soup's done, let me know.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
pot, kettle (none / 0) (#118)
by Hillgiant on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 04:41:54 PM EST

You are a fine one to talk about turning chili into stew, Mr. Chili-served-over-maccironi.

-----
"It is impossible to say what I mean." -johnny
[ Parent ]

How do you figure? (none / 0) (#120)
by codejack on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 05:00:02 PM EST

What kind of stew do you serve over pasta? Pasta is just filler, and generally acceptable with any tomato or cheese based topping. Wine and cream based topping (like stew) should, again generally, be put on rice.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
what do you people eat?! (none / 0) (#169)
by mpalczew on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 01:42:32 PM EST

> Pasta is just filler

you need to layoff the safeway select pasta, and kraft maceroni and cheese.
-- Death to all Fanatics!
[ Parent ]

chili powder must have cumin (none / 0) (#121)
by speek on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 06:10:15 PM EST

or it isn't chili powder.

--
al queda is kicking themsleves for not knowing about the levees
[ Parent ]

Wow. There are waaay too many food snobs here. (3.00 / 4) (#65)
by porkchop_d_clown on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 10:36:51 PM EST

There are times when you want to get all fancy and bring out the individual flavors in your food.  Then there are times when you are trying to mask the taste of bad meat. Chili was not invented for the former case.

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
and 'puters weren't invented to play games (none / 0) (#90)
by spasticfraggle on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 09:31:01 AM EST

So what?

--
I'm the straw that broke the camel's back!
[ Parent ]
Uh. Right. (none / 0) (#96)
by porkchop_d_clown on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 11:52:27 AM EST

Well, I understand your point but your analogy is screwed - 'cause I can't think of a time when computers of any sort weren't being used to play games.

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]
How many games can you play (none / 0) (#151)
by thesk8ingtoad on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 02:22:48 PM EST

on an abacus?
If you build a man a fire, he'll be warm for a day. If you set a man on fire, he'll be warm for the rest of his life.
[ Parent ]
I used to spin the beads on the wires (none / 0) (#158)
by porkchop_d_clown on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 12:53:03 AM EST

IF you flick 'em hard they make a cool "bzzt" sound.

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]
I think I've seen this recipe before... (none / 1) (#69)
by icenine on Thu Dec 09, 2004 at 11:39:24 PM EST

At Hooters. I'm not shitting you. I used to cook there, that's almost exactly the recipe they used, but at only 1/10th the quantity. I don't think I'll be trying your recipe, considering how nasty their chili was.


Want some spicy chili? (3.00 / 3) (#70)
by Patrick Bateman on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:06:52 AM EST

My secret ingredient.

---
I have to return some videotapes.

Not food grade (none / 0) (#145)
by cactus on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 01:58:29 AM EST

No, thank you, I'll stick to food-grade items if I want the capsaicin hit.

Like pure cap - definitely worth stocking.
--
"Politics are the entertainment branch of Industry"
-- Frank Zappa
[ Parent ]
OK, I'll bite... (3.00 / 2) (#71)
by cactus on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:18:22 AM EST

Why not red onions? I like to cook in a little bit of tequila into my beanless chili. The alcohol boils off, but it adds a nice little bite.
--
"Politics are the entertainment branch of Industry"
-- Frank Zappa
Well... (none / 0) (#108)
by codejack on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:51:15 PM EST

Red onions are too sweet, though they have good bite, also. And alcohol, while I won't bash you for it, I consider cheating.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
Cheating?? (none / 0) (#144)
by cactus on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 01:56:05 AM EST

As I mentioned, the alcohol boils off. And I didn't know we were being graded...
--
"Politics are the entertainment branch of Industry"
-- Frank Zappa
[ Parent ]
It's cooking now (3.00 / 2) (#76)
by bg on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 02:16:20 AM EST

Though I made the following alterations:
  • No peppers (couldn't find any at the supermarket up the road and I'm too whacked on painkillers to drive anywhere else to look)
  • Chili flakes instead of powder
  • Included about half a bottle of quality Australian red wine. The rest of the bottle is going down quite nicely
  • Included a fair amount of tobasco
  • Included garlic cos I love that shit
I think I overcooked the beef, but apart from that it's looking okay.

Pretty drunk and buzzed though, so anything's gonna taste good.

- In heaven, all the interesting people are missing.

Good call on the garlic (none / 0) (#117)
by Hillgiant on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 04:29:03 PM EST

Even the most suicidal chili-head will agree that there is such a thing as too many peppers (witness the Nuclear Tacos found in Austin). However, I have become convinced that there is not such a thing as too much garlic. Generally, I just start peeling cloves. When I get tired of that, that is how much goes into the pot.

-----
"It is impossible to say what I mean." -johnny
[ Parent ]

Entirely True (none / 0) (#125)
by kcidx on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 07:28:09 PM EST

There is indeed no such thing as too much garlic. And not only does that go for chili, but for many other foods as well.

I am a firm believer in the peel garlic until you can't stand it anymore measurement.

[ Parent ]

and I thought (none / 1) (#77)
by dimaq on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 03:20:21 AM EST

that hot dishes were designed to increase persperation and thus tolerate hot summer weather...

WTF? (3.00 / 4) (#78)
by theElectron on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 03:36:17 AM EST

habanero? jalapeno? Those are some seriously intense peppers, folks -- use them wisely. I have heard that, due to the intolerable spiciness, serving habanero peppers is considered a form of misdemeanor assault in some jurisdictions. FYI.

In my chilis I use a good quality ground beef, tomato paste, kidney beans, bell peppers, cracked black pepper, and a teaspoon of green tobasco sauce. It's not over the top, but do beware -- it's still pretty hardcore. You'll be crappin' napalm for a week, man -- trust me.

--
Join the NRA!

Habanero are nasty (none / 1) (#79)
by nebbish on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 05:02:04 AM EST

But jalapenos really aren't that bad. If you want some seriously evil chillies, try Jamaican scotch bonnets. Just one will completely ruin a meal for 2 people.

---------
Kicking someone in the head is like punching them in the foot - Bruce Lee
[ Parent ]

Habaneros (3.00 / 2) (#91)
by jolly st nick on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 09:40:31 AM EST

Habaneros are quite tasty, independent of their being extremely hot. You have to be careful, because one end of the pepper is much hotter than the other. Really the are too hot; I'd like it if there were a less hot variety that preserved the other flavor components.

One way of getting that Habanero flavor into your food is just to cut the pepper and lightly rub the pepper over the surface of your plate.

[ Parent ]

Nah... (none / 0) (#99)
by beergut on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:12:15 PM EST

My last batch of chili featured three habanero peppers. The taste of them is fantastic, and you can cut down on some of the spiciness by freezing them. I grow my own peppers, and freeze them. Makes them easier to dissect/deseed and use later, too.

Even my housemate, a Wisconsin cheesehead chick, could eat the chili and enjoy it (though she did complain a bit about the spices).

The goal is not so much to be too hot, but to have exploding flavor.

i don't see any nanorobots or jet engines or laser holography or orbiting death satellites.
i just see some orangutan throwing code-feces at a computer screen.

-- indubitable
[ Parent ]

That's an interesting trick (none / 0) (#113)
by jolly st nick on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 02:45:45 PM EST

Never heard of the freezing trick.

I beleive you probably need a certain amount of fat to buffer the spiciness of a strong pepper. I've also found that having enough salt is important in bringing out the flavor of a hot pepper, although obviously not too much.

[ Parent ]

Fats will absorb/block the heat from the pepper (none / 0) (#137)
by porkchop_d_clown on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 12:22:30 AM EST

Which is one of the reasons sour cream or grated cheese on top of the chili will help as well.

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]
Habneros aren't that bad... (none / 0) (#149)
by thesk8ingtoad on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 02:18:58 PM EST

For Christmas last year, my sister who knows how much I like spicy foods bought me a sample set of salsas from Jose Madrid.  They make a salsa called "Salsa Verde XXX" that is composed primarily of habanero peppers.  This Salsa is EXTREMELY hot.  The only way I found to quench the heat was to continue eating more of it. Even milk seemed to make it hotter.  In the end, after eating the entire jar of salsa, I had to just sit there and wait for the burning to stop.  I highly recommend it!

[ Parent ]
Ha! (none / 0) (#107)
by codejack on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:48:48 PM EST

Tabasco sauce? You must like mild chili with no flavor, ugh. Other than that, replace the bell peppers with at least some jalapenos, and you've got a good start. And check out the pepper chart; Jalapenos aren't that hot.


Please read before posting.

[ Parent ]
From a pinko: YOU ARE A PUSSY! (1.00 / 3) (#111)
by communistpoet on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 01:16:00 PM EST

tobasco is weak! I can drink that shit. You shit napalm from tobasco? You should be killed so you don't infect the gene pool.

We must become better men to make a better world.
[ Parent ]
seconded. (none / 0) (#161)
by Ashur on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 08:35:00 AM EST

tabasco isn't hardcore.

[ Parent ]
A teaspoon? (3.00 / 3) (#127)
by kaboom108 on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 08:51:25 PM EST

Teaspoon of green tobasco sauce? I suggest you ask a friend if you can borrow his balls, because yours are missing. If you cant drink a teaspoon of green tabasco sauce straight something is wrong with you. If I was served what you apparently call chili in a restaraunt I would send it back.

[ Parent ]
No way dude (none / 0) (#131)
by theElectron on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 11:45:54 PM EST

A few drops of that green tobasco sauce goes a LONG way. A little less than three years ago I accidently spilled some of it into a batch of chili while I was trying to pour the sauce into the teaspoon. I didn't think I had spilled that much. Boy was I wrong! By the time that nightmare was over with, I had spent in excess of $150 on various salves, balms, and ointments. It felt like battery acid coming out of me, man. Still gives the jeeblies even thinking about it.

FYI, the parent comment is rated 3.00 for a reason, pal.

--
Join the NRA!
[ Parent ]

They must make green tobasco stronger in your area (none / 0) (#134)
by porkchop_d_clown on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 12:14:09 AM EST

'cause I have, in fact, drank it straight from the bottle to demonstrate how weak it was. It barely rates on the hot-o-meter.

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]
On further reflection (none / 0) (#135)
by porkchop_d_clown on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 12:18:48 AM EST

I recall that there is tremendous variation on how people respond to hot spices. I have a friend, an Indian grandmother, who cooks food that I cannot eat for the amount of spice but her little grandkids gobble it down.

When I was a lot heavier I used hot peppers as an appetite suppressant - it's hard to be hungry when you can't feel your tounge - but these days I gobble them right out of the jar, along with drinking the tobasco.

So, maybe it is just a matter that your normal diet is so lightly spiced (by my "standards") that even a little hot pepper makes things harsh, while I've burned off my taste buds so I need a lot more to get the same effect.


A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]

FOR THE LOVE OF GOD I'M JOKING (n/t) (none / 0) (#150)
by theElectron on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 02:21:36 PM EST



--
Join the NRA!
[ Parent ]
A teaspoon? (none / 0) (#146)
by ibsulon on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 12:37:58 PM EST

You mean, per bowl of chili?

That said, I don't really get into too hot. Some people get the adrenaline rush of not feeling their tongue, but I don't. When I eat hot, it's to enjoy the spices around the hot food.

I tend to avoid jalapeno in my recipes when I can because I don't find the spice particularly good by itself; however, it's a decent complimentary spice and what else are you going to use on nachos?

But finely diced? If you cook it a proper amount of time, the spice is going to disseminate through the chili. Why not leave it coarsely chopped for an additional texture element?

[ Parent ]

Not hot... (none / 0) (#163)
by adamjaskie on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 12:15:35 PM EST

Tabasco sauce is not hot. It just tastes like vinegar. I added some to my chili once, and the amount I had to add to affect the heat in any noticable way made it into nasty vinegar flavoured chili. Oh, and you NEED cumin. If you are going to only add two spices, use chili powder and cumin. Cumin is what makes the chili.

[ Parent ]
This is very similar to the chillies I make (none / 0) (#80)
by nebbish on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 05:05:02 AM EST

And I am famous for my chillies, partly because they are the only thing I can cook. By just using the 3 green chillies you make a nice mild dish that girls can also enjoy.

I wouldn't cook it for so long either - maybe 40 minutes.

---------
Kicking someone in the head is like punching them in the foot - Bruce Lee

Chilli is not for girls <nt> (none / 0) (#86)
by GenerationY on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 07:49:25 AM EST



[ Parent ]
They are a great meal for a first date (3.00 / 6) (#87)
by nebbish on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 08:22:39 AM EST

You can impress her with your farts afterwards.

---------
Kicking someone in the head is like punching them in the foot - Bruce Lee
[ Parent ]

Hey! (none / 0) (#173)
by MyrdemInggala on Mon Dec 13, 2004 at 04:15:02 AM EST

...you make a nice mild dish that girls can also enjoy...

Pfft!

In South Africa we have a Portuguese peri-peri chicken chain called Nando's. They have a heat gradient for the sauce they put on your chicken. I always order extra-hot with no salad, while my boyfriend goes for the wussy lemon & herb.

It greatly amuses me that the waitress always puts down our plates the wrong way round.


-- 22. No matter how tempted I am with the prospect of unlimited power, I will not consume any energy field bigger than my head. -- Evil Overlord List
[ Parent ]
That's pretty funny (none / 0) (#174)
by nebbish on Mon Dec 13, 2004 at 05:12:32 AM EST

We have Nandos here too. I go with my ex sometimes, she has graduated over the past couple of years from lemon and herb to extra hot - I'm very proud of her.

---------
Kicking someone in the head is like punching them in the foot - Bruce Lee
[ Parent ]

served over macaroni with grated cheddar cheese (none / 0) (#89)
by wiredog on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 08:58:04 AM EST

Ahh yes, the Dreaded Chili-Mac. Beloved of institutional cooks everywhere.

Wilford Brimley scares my chickens.
Phil the Canuck

My chilli recipe (3.00 / 4) (#94)
by starsky on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 10:44:28 AM EST

1.  Meat
2.  Chilli sachet from supermarket
3.  Tomatoes

I was going to +1 this but then noticed the author being a little bitch and discounting anyones suggestions - it's a discussion site, dickwad, other people's ideas are interesting and shouldn't be poo-pooed because they don't match yours.

Ergo, -1.

Damnit (3.00 / 2) (#100)
by GenerationY on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:24:42 PM EST

I thought that was my secret recipe...

[ Parent ]
same here (none / 1) (#104)
by Dreamaster on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 12:41:01 PM EST

I especially noted the posts about cumin and garlic. Some folks may not like garlic, but to beat down cumin in a chili? That's crazy talk. -1 (until I get my cumin)
____________________
Mostly Harmless
[ Parent ]
What the heck is a chile sachet? (none / 1) (#132)
by porkchop_d_clown on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 12:12:03 AM EST

'round these here parts, a sachet is a bag of perfumed junk that girls keep in their underwear drawer.

They make those with chiles!?! The girls in your neck of the woods must be awfully tough...

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]

Sorry man (none / 0) (#187)
by starsky on Tue Jan 11, 2005 at 09:36:31 AM EST

U get a packet of ready made chilli mix from the supermarket that you add to mince with tomatoes. Easy peasy.

[ Parent ]
missing ingredient (none / 0) (#130)
by bigbigbison on Fri Dec 10, 2004 at 10:58:25 PM EST

If I'm making chili it has to have spaghetti in it.  Not spaghetti with chili on top, that's Cincy style.  I guess this is southeastern Indiana style or something.  You break up the spaghetti and put it right in the pot with everything else.  The only way to each chili!

Do you deseed your peppers or thow the seeds in? (none / 0) (#136)
by porkchop_d_clown on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 12:20:06 AM EST

I'm wondering because the seeds have a lot of the heat in them...

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
Keep the seeds (none / 0) (#148)
by thesk8ingtoad on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 02:07:34 PM EST

If you don't like heat go ahead and get rid of the seeds.  Otherwise throw the whole thing in there.  To me, Chili just isn't chili without the heat.  Personally I usually add a little extra heat to my chili by adding a capsaisin additive like Pure Cap in addition to the habaneros and jalapenos.  But hey, you're the one who has to eat it- make your own decision.

[ Parent ]
I'm with you. (none / 1) (#152)
by porkchop_d_clown on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 02:34:27 PM EST

I love the heat; my wife, though, comes from a part of Pennsylvania where they think Kraft Single Slices are spicy.

:rolleyes:

I've got 2 pots brewing right now - 1 with green, red & yellow bell peppers and 1 with habeneros & jalapenos.

A bird does not sing because it has an answer. It sings because it is insane. - Obscure Chinese Proverb
[ Parent ]

Weird recipe... (none / 0) (#147)
by ibsulon on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 01:07:37 PM EST

though I'd suggest that everyone remember that chili is regional.

Personally. I'm not a huge fan of the arizona variety, instead looking to our eastern brothers in Santa Fe.

http://www.fiery-foods.com/dave/chiliconcarne9.asp - I'll probably be making Pete's red Chile tonight. (In NM, it's chile instead of chili.)

Weak (none / 0) (#155)
by Jebediah on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 04:21:40 PM EST

If you want good chili using crushed dried peppers from Mexico is the way to go. Add garlic too. PS - Codejack: get out more. Not everything in CA comes in can.

Macaroni? (none / 0) (#156)
by KilljoyAZ on Sat Dec 11, 2004 at 08:57:45 PM EST

Even in California, capitol of "fusion" cuisine and the land where no ingredient is too sacred to put on a pizza, I have never heard of anyone who is willing to put chili over pasta. It just isn't done.

===
Creativitiy cannot be SPELT by over 98% of all American troops. - psychologist
Cincinnati Chili (none / 1) (#157)
by thenick on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 12:45:28 AM EST

That's a chili-like substance that is spread over pasta. It's actually damn good and there's a couple of chains in Ohio that specialize in it.

 
"Doing stuff is overrated. Like Hitler, he did a lot, but don't we all wish he would have stayed home and gotten stoned?" -Dex
[ Parent ]

The Chili I made last night (none / 1) (#162)
by dlur on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 10:53:06 AM EST

I made a medium-sized batch of chili last night because I was bored.  Listed below is what I put in it, and it's not perfect but it does taste and texture pretty damn well.  Remember that I'm no expert and I just threw this together with very little research and a lot of hope that it would turn out well.

In a large stock pot and slowly bringing just to the point of boiling:

~ 1/2 cup red wine
1 can stewed tomatos
~ 1 qt frozen tomatoes that I had grown this year
1 can tomato paste
1 can beef stock
1 can diced tomatos

In a fry pan:
~ 1 Tbs olive oil
~ 1.5lbs of cubed sirloin steak (cheap stuff)
Cooked this until it was grey then threw it in the stock pot.

In a fry pan:
1 lb ground venison (deer meat)
1 lb ground chuck (a little better than hamburger)
1/2 clove of garlic, chopped coarse
1/2 of a yellow onion, diced fine
1/2 of a green pepper, diced fine
Cooked this until the meat was grey then threw it in the stock pot.

Meanwhile, while all of this is cooking I'm busy slicing up the rest of my peppers and de-seeding them.  The other peppers that I put into the stock pot right away are:

4 - jalepenos
2 - serranos
1/2 - yellow bell pepper for color
1/2 - green pepper for color (in addition to what I had fried up with the ground meat)
When all of this was chopped up I added it to the stock pot and brought it up to a slow boil.

I also added spices at this time:
~1 Tbs of chili powder
Some black pepper
Some salt
Some celery salt
Some cayanne pepper
Some onion powder
A small scoop of granulated chicken boulion
A small scoop of granulated beef boulion
Some cracked red pepper
~ 1 Tbs of brown sugar

I stirred frequently throughout the entire debacle and after everything had boiled slowly for a while I added my beans:
1 can light chili beans in chili gravy (eww)
1 can dark red chili beans
1 can black beans
1 stalk of celery, diced small

I brought everything down to a simmer(lowish heat) and let it simmer for about half an hour like this, taking a taste every time I stirred it during the simmer.  I added more spices as needed by my tastings.

In the end I ended up with close to 3/4 of a gallon of chili.  Some of this will end up in my freezer for later, a big tub of it will stay in my fridge, and two small tubs I will give to friends to see what they think of my batch.

My critique of my "recipe" after 1 bowl is this:
Could use a little more initial front end bite...not much, but just a little.  There is sufficient staying heat that starts about 3 seconds into savoring the mouthfull, but I was hoping the serranos would have given me a little more fast kick.  I can definately tell that it was a good thing to put the celery salt and the brown sugar in, as it added a lot of carmelized warmth to the flavor.  The texture is very good, especially with the 3 different meats and 3 different beans, and the little bit of celery thrown in at the last drop for crunch.  The batch has good color for presentation, with a deep red hue with flecks of yellow and green coloring.  I love to sprinkle a little bit of shredded or grated sharp chedder or pepperjack cheese over my chili while it is pipin' hot.  I also juse crumbled soda crackers in my chili because I like it so thick that you can stand a spoon up in it with ease.

If anyone has any critiques of my ingredients or my cooking technique, let me know so that the next batch can be even better than this already good one.


More garlic (none / 0) (#181)
by adamjaskie on Tue Dec 14, 2004 at 12:40:46 PM EST

For that much chili, half a clove isn't much. I use three or four at the least, for about the same amount of chili. Cooking technique: Cook it ahead of time, and refrigerate it. It gets better every time you reheat it.

[ Parent ]
Garlic (none / 0) (#183)
by dlur on Tue Dec 14, 2004 at 06:19:20 PM EST

I'll try more garlic next time for sure, might give it a little more front-end kick without overpowering the lasting heat.

Also, I always cool it down and fridge or freeze it before I reheat and eat.  Chili, Lasagna(almost any italian-style food) all seem to be best the second, third, or sixth time around.

[ Parent ]

can (none / 1) (#165)
by mpalczew on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 01:27:08 PM EST

you do of course realize that cans come in different sizes.  It would have been helpfull if you posted the size of the can.
-- Death to all Fanatics!
It's really not an exact science (none / 1) (#167)
by dlur on Sun Dec 12, 2004 at 01:37:39 PM EST

Baking needs exact measurements.  Cooking, especially dishes such as chili, stews, soups, or caseroles generally aren't all that exacting.  You aren't trying to make chemical reactions you're trying to make something that tastes good.

In other words use common sense and good judgement.

[ Parent ]

then what's the point (none / 0) (#177)
by mpalczew on Mon Dec 13, 2004 at 02:25:27 PM EST

Can size very insize by a factor of 8(for most cans, some come really huge, but I'm ignoring those).  You may as well not even put how much tomatoes you need.  Just say, some tomatoes(use good judgement).  And yes if you put way to much tomatoes it will come out "funny".  If you have never made chili before and you need a recipe experience won't tell you how much is correct.
-- Death to all Fanatics!
[ Parent ]
No cumin? Are you mad? (none / 0) (#172)
by Khendon on Mon Dec 13, 2004 at 02:47:24 AM EST

How can you have a chilli without cumin? Madness.

This man speaks the truth! (none / 0) (#180)
by adamjaskie on Tue Dec 14, 2004 at 11:53:15 AM EST

Cumin is the second most important ingredient, behind chili peppers. Chili powder has both, but it also has too much salt. I forgo chili powder, instead using the individual ingrediants in my own proportions (exact measurments being "until it tastes right"):

  • Cayenne pepper
  • Cumin
  • FRESH garlic
  • Black pepper
  • Red pepper flakes
  • Oregano (NOT the kind related to mint. The other kind.)
  • Salt

I have been thinking, perhaps some sliced up Chorizo sausage would be good in chili.



[ Parent ]
Texas Chili (none / 0) (#179)
by Swood76528 on Tue Dec 14, 2004 at 07:15:31 AM EST

Real Chili has: Beef Garlic Onion Cumin Chili Powder Red Pepper Salt Tomato water and nothing else, certainly not beans.

uninspired. (none / 0) (#182)
by naught on Tue Dec 14, 2004 at 04:32:00 PM EST

maybe chili is boring to you, and anything better is soup, but i'd suggest that's because you don't know shit about food.

finding a store that sells dried chiles isn't hard.  neither is finding a selection that is far and away better than whatever brand sits on the wal-mart shelf, and grinding them up yourself.  a little experimentation in cooking is a good thing.

do wear gloves, however, when cutting dried habaneros.

i use a ratio of four ancho chiles, three new mexico chiles, two japones and two habaneros to be the stuff.  leave the oregano out of the chili powder, and instead use fresh in the pot, added about 30 minutes before you take it off the stove.

a little red wine vinegar is nice too.

differing tastes yield different ratios of peppers.  experiment.  find what you and your friends like, but most of all, don't submit a recipe from betty crocker's website.

--
"extension of knowledge is the root of all virtue" -- confucius.

Fuck your nasty-ass chili, and fuck you! (none / 0) (#185)
by QillerPenguin on Thu Dec 16, 2004 at 11:59:00 PM EST

This is real chili!

"All your Unix are belong to us" - SCO, 2003.
Fuck your nasty-ass chili, and fuck you! (none / 0) (#186)
by QillerPenguin on Thu Dec 16, 2004 at 11:59:53 PM EST

This is real chili!

"All your Unix are belong to us" - SCO, 2003.
Codejack's really hot chili | 188 comments (162 topical, 26 editorial, 0 hidden)
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