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[P]
Culmination of Business and Culture

By cataclysmx in Culture
Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 04:04:58 PM EST
Tags: Culture (all tags)
Culture

In the world today, the changes that are being resolved through the usage of technology and the requirement of communication have rapidly changed the culture as know it. With the recent efforts of India and China to work together in the IT sector and Himalayan border disputes, the two largest populations are heading towards a revolutionary endeavour.

Protests by Tibetan exiles remind me of darker years in the past, yet their lack of involvement in the culmination of the future international conglomerate of business which will transcend all nations, makes them an easy oversight. India made a simple oversight by recognizing the region of the Tibetan Autonomous Republic as part of the People's Republic of China, in 2003.


The downfall of Tibet in 1951 when the Chinese troops invaded Lhasa the former capital by the thousand, outraged India. in 1950 negotiation by China was unfair and summarily rejected by Tibet, infuriating China even further. Eventually the Tibetan delegation party was more or less forced under duress to sign the papers, although they lacked the authorization to make this deal under His Holiness or the Tibetan government. The broadcast over radio of a "Peaceful Liberation of Tibet" was the first heard by the majority of Tibetans including the Dalai Lama himself. On September 9th, 1951, thousands of Chinese soldiers entered Lhasa, thousands in the midst behind them, pacifying them, the Chinese confused the Tibetan numbers with positive offers of educational and religious freedom.

Appeals to the UN being blocked by the British, and the Indian governments. The Tibetan people had little to do but attempt negotiations with China. The first treaty signed promised a lot. And the Chinese did not live up to it. The Chinese had created the Seventeen Point Agreement. Which, outlining a series of lies, the trust between two nations quickly faded. The entire world turned its head over the years, particularly the British and Indians who did not want to affect their business relations. The British not wanting to threaten their prosperous relationship with China and in Hong Kong.

So far between 1.2 and 1.5 Million Tibetans have been killed, thousands dying in prisons, hundreds of thousands in the original uprising. The Chinese have done a number of crimes to the Tibetans that parallel the holocaust. Between shooting unarmed demonstrators, creating forced labor camps, the Chinese were showing no lost feelings for their former friends and neighbours. Large prisoner populations in Tibet consist of mainly people who wrote letters about the situation, political prisoners, monks and nuns. The average sentence is 6.5 years for political crimes.

A famous case of unusual cruelty is the case of Palden Gyatso a monk from Tibet, who was tortured for 33 years, was able to bribe prison guards to hand over implements of torture in 1992 and these devices were widely seen in 1995 by the west. Being exposed to class and religious oppression, he served as an inspiration to his fellow inmates by never surrendering or changing his Tibetan ways. Nor would he ever accept Chinese ideology or communism. Serving more years than any other Tibetan monk to escape to the west, he dedicates his entire life to exposing the cruelty of the Chinese. From giving evidence in Geneva before the UN whose members turned their heads previously, to speaking before US Congress, describing the ruthless torture. He says, "A prison official poked me with an electric cattle prod and poured boiling water over me because he said he did not like my attitude. No medical treatment was given after that." Many died, lots of people cared, many people who could make a difference simply turning their heads because of one simple reason, there's no business in Tibet.

Almost as a testament to the way the world is heading, spirituality, and non-materialistic lifestyles do not coincide with the business world. Many nations represent their stature involving their reactions to the actions of other countrys largely in their vested business interests. A current situation is with Iraq, there is too much business invested for anyone in the world to oppose the invasion in a militaristic fashion, regardless of their political views. As the USA had the opportunity to have a stance against China about Tibet, China has a chance to oppose the USA over Iraq only declaring it an illegal invasion. A mutual silent agreement amongst two large business partners. The Indian government once outraged about Tibet, today is no longer upset, their country charged with an economic ambition that exceeds the capacity for regarding the Tibet conflict as anything more than a map change.

The economic prowess of a country largely reflects on what they are able to do on a real world stage. This is largely Taiwan's defence against the Chinese invasion, but when their day comes and the Chinese do invade Taiwan, which is mandated under their current government, will their economic prowess be enough to risk defending them from an even bigger business partner?

In the end, the loss of Tibet and many of its people were the start of a different world, where culture is slowly starting to become a culture of business rather than a reflection of traditional values. The cold shoulder towards Darfur area in Sudan, no money to be made saving black people in Africa, they probably all have AIDs anyways right? Science fiction authors used to write about robots taking over the world, I think we are becoming robots ourselves, losing all compassion and becoming self absorbed and selfish. Life has a price, and you only have to have money to get it taken away or saved. The scale of justice has money on both sides.

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Have you ever done anything to assist a humanitarian crisis?
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Display: Sort:
Culmination of Business and Culture | 57 comments (31 topical, 26 editorial, 0 hidden)
Small feudal country taken over by Communists (2.33 / 6) (#2)
by sien on Mon Apr 11, 2005 at 05:18:09 AM EST

That's right folks, it's big business that is to blame!

Kuwait? small, feudal etc. <nt> (none / 1) (#6)
by GenerationY on Mon Apr 11, 2005 at 09:41:35 AM EST



[ Parent ]
China is about as "Communist"... (none / 1) (#56)
by shinshin on Thu Apr 14, 2005 at 06:10:04 PM EST

... as I am.

Which is to say, not at all.

Just because they refuse to admit defeat and change the name of their country doesn't mean that they are Communist in any sense of the word.

____
We believe he has, in fact, reconstituted nuclear weapons --Dick Cheney, Meet the Press, March 16, 2003
[ Parent ]

WHAT THE- Tibet is STILL occupied by China? (3.00 / 9) (#4)
by Anonymous Howards End on Mon Apr 11, 2005 at 08:41:17 AM EST

Didn't we have, like, a march or something?
--
CodeWright, you are one cowardly hypocritical motherfucker.
roffle~ -nt (none / 0) (#19)
by Kasreyn on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 04:27:56 AM EST

nt
"Extenuating circumstance to be mentioned on Judgement Day:
We never asked to be born in the first place."

R.I.P. Kurt. You will be missed.
[ Parent ]
English (3.00 / 6) (#10)
by cataclysmx on Mon Apr 11, 2005 at 08:32:03 PM EST

English is not my first language and I'm required to be able to write articles for a business. So this is just practice for me, I am from Tibet. Sorry for any confusion that my lack of prose may have caused. It is a learning process and I thank you all for the constructive criticism. Run-on sentences and creating proper word structure is something I struggle with.

Keep it up... (2.33 / 3) (#14)
by The Amazing Idiot on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 02:40:33 AM EST

And dont let the idiots (except me, mind you ;-) insult and degrade you.

I'm from the US, and many many here cannot spell or use correct English.

And take it from me, Coryoth comes off humble, but you'd be wise to listen to his reccomended changes.

The only thing I can see you getting your article knocked down is that you have no posting history here. We get a lot of people copy/pasting from CNN or other worldwide news sources and putting their name on it. Nullo is the derogitory name we use to describe that (as you see 0 posts, 0 stories, 0 diaries, 0 ads on your information sheet).

If anything, you at least have a +1 SB (sidebar) from me, just due to interest.

[ Parent ]

Please remove the cock from your mouth. (1.00 / 6) (#23)
by pestilence on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 06:31:16 AM EST

Take it to a hotel room please.


A documented gay hook-up
[ Parent ]
Well, hey. (3.00 / 2) (#17)
by Kasreyn on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 04:26:34 AM EST

Trying is good. Just don't try to have one article be everything to everyone next time. Slow down, take a breath, and choose just one facet of the situation to apply some focus to. If you find yourself still wanting to say more, by all means make it a multi-part story.

For instance, your article covers oppression of Tibet by China, future and current oppression of Taiwan, and musings on the overtaking of culture by business. These are rightly three different topics. Admittedly it's possible to link them in a story, but to do that, you need to devote a lot more time and effort to it (read: needs to be much bigger and more carefully outlined).

Good luck.


"Extenuating circumstance to be mentioned on Judgement Day:
We never asked to be born in the first place."

R.I.P. Kurt. You will be missed.
[ Parent ]
Agreed. (none / 0) (#34)
by JahToasted on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 06:09:32 PM EST

Really this should be expaned to 3 articles. I'm having a hard time deciding wether or not to vote it up or down because he does bring up some good ideas, but he doesn't expand on them enough. The article is all over the place.

But if each idea were expanded on and put into separate article, each would get +1 from me.
______
"I wanna have my kicks before the whole shithouse goes up in flames" -- Jim Morrison
[ Parent ]

Could you try (none / 0) (#35)
by JahToasted on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 06:11:41 PM EST

to make it a little more personalised? There are a lot of articles written by the hollywood buddhists about the plight of tibet, and they get pretty boring after a while. Being from tibet yourself, maybe you have some personal experiences to share?
______
"I wanna have my kicks before the whole shithouse goes up in flames" -- Jim Morrison
[ Parent ]
In that case, can you tell me... (none / 0) (#57)
by Russell Dovey on Mon Apr 18, 2005 at 03:21:47 PM EST

...if this article I wrote, about a monk called Nyima Drakpa, is a heap of crap?

"Blessed are the cracked, for they let in the light." - Spike Milligan
[ Parent ]

Oooooh hooo hooooo! (1.00 / 9) (#22)
by pestilence on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 06:29:23 AM EST

Hoooooooooo ooooh hoooo hooooo! (That's the sound that a beaten housewife makes after hubby has performed his business.)


A documented gay hook-up
this is kind of funny (2.75 / 4) (#31)
by circletimessquare on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 01:07:52 PM EST

In the end, the loss of Tibet and many of its people were the start of a different world, where culture is slowly starting to become a culture of business rather than a reflection of traditional values. The cold shoulder towards Darfur area in Sudan, no money to be made saving black people in Africa, they probably all have AIDs anyways right?

tibet, invaded by communist forces, is dying because of... big business

darfur, where un bureaucrats argue about the definition of the word "genocide" while thousands die, and over which the us is for intervention asap (you know, the evil big business place), is not being intervened for because... they all have AIDS?!

wtf?!

in your attempt to paint those who work against you as racists, don't wind up generating racist thoughts no one really thinks except apparently yourself

;-P


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

The Darfur Crisis (none / 0) (#38)
by cataclysmx on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 09:08:10 PM EST

This has been going on for a long time, the US wanted intervention ASAP in Iraq, how long did that take?

[ Parent ]
so the usa is wrong... (none / 0) (#40)
by circletimessquare on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 11:48:12 PM EST

because it went against the screaming and howling in the world, and did the right thing in iraq anyways

but it did NOT do the right thing because it reluctantly went WITH the screaning and howling in the world, even though intervention in sudan is the right thing

pray tell dear fuckface, when do plan on stop holding the us accountable for everything in the world, when do you stop damning them when they do and damning them when they don't, and WHEN DO CRITICIZE ALL THE OTHER MORE FUCKING USELESS NATIONS?


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

That's right (none / 0) (#44)
by levesque on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 02:59:06 PM EST

criticize all the nations' peoples, always, on each decision, because it's people's actions that lead to unrest or rest not a nation's actions.

Anything that could be seen as "ending up good" is always a mute point because we do not know what other outcomes would have been.

Do you think the US is some coherent force for good.

Nations encompass many self-interests. Nations don't do, people do, and if the apparent outcome is good it is not "The Nations" fault. It would be easier to blame good on some inherent human force that in the end averages to at least a morsel more good than bad.

The nation, in this context, is probably better viewed as an armor and a sword. There is no plan for good, only certain actions by certain people. The concerns of some people in positions of authority, non-transparent concerns, can easily override the intentions of the majority and these, non-transparent concerns, could be viewed as the problem.



[ Parent ]

excellent (none / 0) (#48)
by circletimessquare on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 04:28:21 PM EST

now take your points to their natural conclusion

if the usa is a shield and sword, should it be used? where should it be used?

you'll figure it out and see that those who oppose the us are not helping the evils they say they oppose, they are in fact helping them

because you are correct: 1. the usa is no absolute good

but the point is 2. it is no absolute evil either

now talk to some of the fruitloops about the second point


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

Point 1, 2 (none / 1) (#49)
by levesque on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 07:42:44 PM EST

Yes. Maybe it is easier to blame than understand peoples behavior. Maybe that has something to do with focus, if it is set to really see other's behavior in their context then it is also set to really see ourselves in our personal context and if you arrive at this point and you back up -there are no differences worth dwelling on. Possibly under standing leads to long term systemic change, more like leaning than revolution, where everyone has as much to learn as everyone else.

If he is so wrong then teach him but not as a ward, nor with force or propaganda and remember if you do know, you only have to point.

[ Parent ]

well said (none / 1) (#51)
by circletimessquare on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 09:05:08 PM EST

and i would add, that among us, are those who would dictate to us how the world actors should behave, strictly because they don't understand real human behavior in the real world

then the source of their moral outrage, their righteous indignation, is that of a teenager's: so much to say precisely because they know so little

so what happens is, in the name of fighting for good ideals, they wind up fighting that which actually furthers those ideals in the real world... is there no us actions that promote the fight against poverty, injustice, suffering? is there no third world actions which further poverty, injustice, suffering? so why does the usa bear the brunt of the criticism? is it intelligent, does it help the fight, that the usa bears the brunt of the criticism?

i think not

look at the criticism of americna military actions: do those who criticize the americna military understand the relationship in the REAL WORLD between poverty and security?

so because they don't understand human nature, they actually wind up working for the continuation of evils they dislike, strictly because they don't understand how their behavior really works out in the end: criticising that which they can criticize simply because its a big fat easy target, and falling dead silent on real sources of evil in the world

that doesn't help

The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

my problem with the article (none / 1) (#39)
by speek on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 10:34:06 PM EST

I don't have a complaint with laying the blame at the feet of business or "profit motive" (interpreted largely), but I do think it's misguided to say the loss of Tibet was the start of a different world. This implies the world used to be a moral place, and now is no longer - that it has dramatically changed for the worse. But that couldn't be further from the truth.

The world has always sucked. People have always sucked. Morality has always taken a back seat to profit motive. Now is just more the same. Tibet was more of the same. Darfur is more of the same. WWII was more of the same. Ghengis Khan was more of the same.

You get the idea.

--
al queda is kicking themsleves for not knowing about the levees
[ Parent ]

yeah, you're a fucking cynic (none / 1) (#41)
by circletimessquare on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 11:49:09 PM EST

the world is improving, it really is

grow a fucking heart


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

ironic comment (none / 0) (#42)
by Phil Urich on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 01:22:48 AM EST

to be put with such hostility.

[ Parent ]
you think i'm the paramount of civilization? (none / 0) (#46)
by circletimessquare on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 04:23:20 PM EST

thanks! ;-)

The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]
well, the evidence surrounds us (none / 0) (#43)
by speek on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 08:19:19 AM EST

People drop their morals when economics quivers its pinky. I'm just saying it didn't start being that way in 1950.

--
al queda is kicking themsleves for not knowing about the levees
[ Parent ]

economics matters (none / 0) (#47)
by circletimessquare on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 04:25:22 PM EST

you need to eat

morality is most respected in an environment where people's needs are secure

that's part of the point of opposing bad ideas which increase insecurity

because then economics does trump morality more than it should

so some people's naive ideas wind up creating the evils they think they're fighting, but which they're really helping, because they are so naive about how the world really works


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

I wish it were that simple (none / 0) (#50)
by speek on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 08:58:55 PM EST

I didn't say morality loses when economics rears its ugly head - I can fully understand the most morally depraved actions done for the purpose of survival. I said morality loses when economics quivers its pinky, and I did so on purpose, because sadly, people begin rationalizing all kinds of new ways of interpreting their own morality for little more than pocket change, even when steak is what's for dinner either way.

And people (as a whole, with notable and not insignificant exceptions) have always been that way.

--
al queda is kicking themsleves for not knowing about the levees
[ Parent ]

you lose if you become cynical (none / 1) (#52)
by circletimessquare on Wed Apr 13, 2005 at 09:11:11 PM EST

cynicism is useless

to become cynical about human nature implies 2 facts you should be aware of:

  1. in a way, you are accepting the evils you dislike
  2. you should shut up and leave the conversation. seriously, because the unwritten assumption in the conversation is that you speak in order to further the fight for improvement in the world. but by becoming cynical, you have broken that unwritten assumption. thereofre, you have simply announced, with your cynicism, that you don't wish to speak anymore, and if you continue speaking, you simply have revealed an arrogance on your own part: that we need to hear your words, when we already understand the real implications of your words, that you apparently do not
cynicism, negativity, never wins or is useful

but positive criticism is, so frame your words in terms of hope, or begone with you

to give up hope in mankind is to cause violence to yourself and to mankind, and it's not important that we listen to you anymore if you succumb to it


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

you assume too much (none / 1) (#53)
by speek on Thu Apr 14, 2005 at 07:58:59 AM EST

I have only said the current corruption of morals by profit motive isn't new. People have always been that way in the past and are that way today, as a whole. I've not said anything about the future, about possibilities for improvement in both people and in our circumstances.

I agree entirely with what you said, but you've assumed a lot to apply it to me here. There's a difference between facing up to unpleasant truths, and being hopelessly cynical.

--
al queda is kicking themsleves for not knowing about the levees
[ Parent ]

Are you new to this whole Intarweb thing? (none / 0) (#55)
by smithmc on Thu Apr 14, 2005 at 04:36:06 PM EST


you should shut up and leave the conversation. seriously, because the unwritten assumption in the conversation is that you speak in order to further the fight for improvement in the world.

You're kidding, right?

[ Parent ]

Apology (3.00 / 3) (#37)
by cataclysmx on Tue Apr 12, 2005 at 09:05:45 PM EST

I apologize for my lack of finesse when it comes to tense and prose, again.

I know it was hard to read, trust me it was a lot harder to write. Everything you people say I take to my heart to try to do it better next time, this won't be the first article I write and I admit it was flippant and 'all over the place'.

It was an emotional writing that took place very early in the morning after a long conversation with a very old friend of mine. We started talking about old times and began to almost theorize why these things always seem to happen to the peaceful people and not the evil people. Money is the sole thing that is similar in every situation, the oppressor is always fueled by it.

I am glad to hear some of you got the message that I was trying to send. And to the person who said it was a racist remark about the Sudanese in Africa, it was merely misinterpreted. People look beyond Africa when they consider foreign aid. The recent tsunami crisis, nobody sent any aid to Somalia even though they had lost people as well in the tsunami. Less people died in the tsunami than people die in Africa every year, and far less is done. I was just trying to illustrate that life to some people, does have a price tag.

And until we start to treat everyone equally, sooner or later everyone will suffer. I am going to write another article and I will make it better than the last one.

Thank you for your time and patience in my struggle to explain my points of views and messages.

Culmination of Business and Culture | 57 comments (31 topical, 26 editorial, 0 hidden)
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