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Recipe for Tortilla Casserole (Hotdish)

By Abominable Abitur in Culture
Fri May 05, 2006 at 12:00:00 PM EST
Tags: Food (all tags)
Food

What follows is the general outline for a dish that is the most comfortable of all my comfort foods.

It contains cheese, tortillas and some kind of meat, what more could you need?


Tortilla Casserole Stuff

Basic Ingredients for 1 pan:

Cheese - at least two cups (16 ounces = 1 pound = [454grams]), but I usually use three to four. I prefer to use a colby/jack mix or a "mexican" mix that can be easily found in the cheese section.

1 can condensed Cream of 'Something' Soup - mushroom is standard, my mother uses cream of chicken (celery and broccoli aren't good). I've also seen a Squash Flower Soup by Campbell's that would be pretty tasty. I generally prefer the low salt varieties as there is usually enough salt in the meat(when prepared) and cheese. I've taken to buying the box of Portabella Mushroom soup and just adding green chiles to it. You won't need soup stock if the soup isn't condensed.

Soup Stock - volume is equal to cream soup, can use any meat or vegetable stock (No-Chicken Chicken flavored Veg. Stock is a favorite though it can be a bit salty.) Use stock that goes with the additives that you're using. I wouldn't suggest fish stock with beef strips.

Tortillas - I usually mix corn and flour, but you can use whatever you prefer. I buy the burrito sized flour tortillas and a package of corn tortillas. I've used "wraps" and tortilla like creations (those low-carb frisbees aren't so bad with enough cheese and soup mixture). My aunt has used tortilla chips and it was pretty tasty (though salty).

Possible Additives:


  • Chicken (I cook the chicken in a can of enchilada sauce, usually 1 or 2 breasts depending on the size. You can figure about a half pound per pan, though really this is all about your tastes so feel free to load the sucker up.)

  • Turkey (leftover Thanksgiving turkey is originally what my mother used, my brother indirect grilled a turkey over mesquite one Thanksgiving and it made an INCREDIBLE casserole.)

  • Beef. Carne asada or lime marinated strip steak is pretty damn good. usually going to want to have a layer of beans in there too. this is a good dish for a dry meat too since there is a lot of moisture in the ingredients. I haven't tried it with Buffalo yet, but I imagine it would be fantastic-especially with the shredded Buff roast my aunt makes.

  • Fish. My aunt has successfully made this dish using Halibut. She used tortilla chips to soak up the extra water than comes from the fish (even precooked fish will release water) and we added a can of Salsa Casera to keep things from getting bland. I'll have to try it with Salmon sometime since I can't eat the shitty farmed crap unless it's disguised in something.

  • Vegetarian black bean soup, vegetarian chili (I've prepared this meal both vegetarian and vegan. Be sure to use a cheese substitute that melts. I've found Vegan-Rella to work quite well. If you're a Vegan you're probably pretty used to reading labels, if you're preparing this for a Vegan ask them or ask someone in the store where you're purchasing items if something is Vegan friendly. I made this dish for my going away party the other day and several "meat-eaters" told me that they actually preferred the Vegan Hotdish to the Chicken Hotdish and were surprised that it was Vegan.)

  • Mexi-Corn (or plain corn mixed with salsa or enchilada sauce)

  • Diced green chiles

  • Jalapenos (be very careful with these. my mother used the "juice" from a can of jalapenos with the soup stock and the dish was completely inedible - it was TOO hot even for her.)

  • Sliced black olives (personal favorite)

  • A really chunky salsa is good inside too, I've found that a flavorful salsa rather than a spicy salsa tastes best (to me anyway).

  • Zuchini and/or squash (I slice them and then cook in a can of enchilada sauce, be sure to use extra tortillas if you use uncooked veggies as quite a bit of moisture gets cooked out and you can end up with a soupy mess.)

Assembly:

  1. pour cream soup, soup stock and green chiles into bowl, mix well.

  2. ladle 2 scoops of mixture into bottom of baking dish.

  3. tear up 2 tortillas toss them into the bowl so they form a loose cover of the bottom (it's okay to have gaps).

  4. add meat or chili (or whatever additive you're using).

  5. sprinkle handful or two of cheese over meat/chili (whatever)

  6. add 2 more scoops of mixture.

  7. repeat tortilla tear-up scenario, additive addition, cheese, mixture, tortilla, etc until the last layer.

  8. On the last layer, tear the tortillas, add mixture, then top with cheese. Don't fill the dish all the way to the top, you'll want a little bit of a gap at the top to prevent spillover.

The Cooking Part:

Preheat oven to 400° [200C]. Add Casserole(s) to oven, bake for one hour or so. If everything is bubbling (especially the middle) and the cheese is browning on top then it's done. I've cooked the dish with the lid on and with it off. Having the lid on seems to get the center cooked better and doesn't get the cheese too brown. When you think it's done, take it out of the oven and let it sit for 10-15 minutes. It allows the casserole to cool and set up. I've burned my mouth on molten cheese up to 30 minutes after removing it from the oven.

Tips:

If you're using something with the potential to be watery, add another tortilla above and below that layer. Feel free to experiment. Use spices/additives that you enjoy. If you're using Turkey or Chicken, just make sure it's fully cooked prior to adding it to the casserole. I've used the roasted chickens you can buy whole at most grocery stores, as well as leftover baked chicken (23 clove chicken is pretty amazing). I enjoy the flavors imparted from the enchilada sauce, so that's why I usually prepare it that way. If time is a factor, use something fast.

To me, there is no such thing as "too much" cheese, though my oven may disagree (it does have the potential to boil over).

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Recipe for Tortilla Casserole (Hotdish) | 69 comments (47 topical, 22 editorial, 0 hidden)
I love it...food hacking /nt (2.00 / 4) (#1)
by terryfunk on Fri May 05, 2006 at 10:13:56 PM EST



I like you, I'll kill you last. - Killer Clown
The ScuttledMonkey: A Story Collection

LOL yeah (none / 0) (#2)
by Abominable Abitur on Fri May 05, 2006 at 10:59:11 PM EST

Whenever I make it I get recipe requests and this is essentially what I give to people now. They're expecting a little 3x5 card and I hand them a sheet of text that basically says: 1) here's what you can use, 2) here's how to put it together, and 3) here's how to cook it; Now go have fun!

When people ask my mom for the recipe she basically says the same thing I do, "well, it's not really a recipe, it's more of a outline."

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]

OOOH, I KNOW! (3.00 / 4) (#19)
by indubitable on Sat May 06, 2006 at 12:35:50 PM EST

LET'S START A BLOG AND INVENT YET ANOTHER WORD FOR COOKING! HACKING IS PASSE NOW, LET'S GET WITH THE TIMES.

What kind of sick fuck doesn't want to roger some dude wearing a bear suit?
[ Parent ]

Potato Mashup. (none / 0) (#39)
by Scrymarch on Sun May 07, 2006 at 04:26:11 AM EST



[ Parent ]
Food articles are rare. +1 SP. (2.50 / 2) (#3)
by TheNoxx on Sat May 06, 2006 at 12:57:10 AM EST

This is the only food article we've had besides cooking squirrels in over a year.

Speaking of which... perhaps I should write up some stuff for cheap and lean Kuron cuisine.

yeah... (none / 0) (#6)
by livus on Sat May 06, 2006 at 02:13:32 AM EST

nothing measures up to that goat brain thing, either.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
please don't (none / 0) (#18)
by indubitable on Sat May 06, 2006 at 12:33:58 PM EST

beercan chicken redux... ugh.

let's face it, you people can't cook worth a damn.

What kind of sick fuck doesn't want to roger some dude wearing a bear suit?
[ Parent ]

+1 practical. (2.50 / 2) (#7)
by livus on Sat May 06, 2006 at 02:15:45 AM EST

I'm not going to make this - it sounds weird to me - but I highly approve of the style of the recipe. Well done.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

Thank you (none / 1) (#14)
by Abominable Abitur on Sat May 06, 2006 at 04:50:33 AM EST

What sounds weird about it?

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]
I'm sure it's fine and delicious (3.00 / 4) (#35)
by livus on Sat May 06, 2006 at 09:05:39 PM EST

I simply have a problem with soggy things that were once firm. For instance I don't put milk into cereal until I'm just about to eat it. And I have never engaged in a game of "soggy biscuit".

I could probably replace the tortilla with scalloped potato, I suppose.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

very much so. (none / 1) (#41)
by Abominable Abitur on Sun May 07, 2006 at 07:38:21 AM EST

with the negating that has occured because of my mother's insistance to use these weird rice sheets, i would TOTALLY try out potatoes. the only thing that I would be hesitant on would be the cost of the potatoes. Maybe you can buy them at the grocery and peel them yourself?

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]
how else does one get potatoes? (none / 0) (#44)
by livus on Mon May 08, 2006 at 04:32:05 AM EST

I am of course going to buy some potatos, wash them (no need to peel), and slice them. I was thinking "agria" variety would work well, or red skinned potatos.

Are they really available pre-prepared where you are?

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

re: instant potatos (none / 1) (#45)
by adamjaskie on Mon May 08, 2006 at 10:32:55 AM EST

They are available pre-prepared here, usually dried and in boxes with the hamburger helper and such. I have never cooked with those, but have had them on boy-scout camping trips, culinary hells as they are (imagine: (boiled) hot dogs, spaghetti-os, and instant potatos utilizing the water from the hot-dogs. Shudder).

I like Yukon Gold, myself, for a good, general-purpose potato.

[ Parent ]

Yukon Gold are good (none / 1) (#47)
by Abominable Abitur on Mon May 08, 2006 at 11:42:16 AM EST

I don't mind reds though.

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]
scalloped potatoes (none / 1) (#48)
by Abominable Abitur on Mon May 08, 2006 at 11:46:02 AM EST

come in a box from the "hamburger helper" people. I mean I know you can prepare scalloped potatoes from scratch, but I've rarely been served them that way.

Reds are pretty good potatoes. I don't use them for everything though because they seem too starchy for some dishes. Yukon Golds are good. I try to stay away from the large bakers potatoes and stick with smaller potatoes because the large ones tend to not taste as good to me.

One of the aspects of the dish is that the tortillas soak up a lot of the moisture so you'd want to play with your ratios when using potatoes.

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]

re: scalloped potatoes (3.00 / 2) (#50)
by adamjaskie on Mon May 08, 2006 at 02:41:22 PM EST

It isn't exactly hard.

Make a cheese sauce (mornay) by mixing some shredded cheese (sharp cheddar is good) into a white sauce (bechamel - 2tb butter heated until foaming in a sauce pan, whisk in 3tb flour; cook on medium heat until it darkens slightly; slowly add 2c hot milk and cook, whisking often, until thickened; season with salt and pepper).

Alternate layers of sliced potatoes (I like to throw in some onions with the potatos, cut in half lengthwise then sliced), cheese sauce, and shredded cheese in a casserole dish; two or three layers of each.

Cover and bake at 400 degrees until the potatos are tender, then remove the cover, and run it under the broiler until the top is golden brown.

There are all sorts of variations, the cheese is optional, you can just use white sauce and potatos if you want (you will need to season the white sauce with a bit more than salt and pepper; I like a tiny pinch of nutmeg, and some paprika), or you can take out the cheese, add cabbage and kielbasa, and you have a full meal.

[ Parent ]

thanks asshole!! Now I'm hungry!!! (none / 1) (#51)
by Abominable Abitur on Mon May 08, 2006 at 02:57:56 PM EST

That sounds so good. I skipped breakfast today and I've got an hour until lunch.

I like the cabbage and kielbasa with potatoes dish. That sounds AWESOME!!!

And I'm not just saying that because I'm hungry!

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]

I can't even find kie-lbasa here (none / 0) (#54)
by livus on Mon May 08, 2006 at 05:55:11 PM EST

afaik... I should start stalking the Polish community.

Reminds me though, my comfort-food dish "Cabbage Surprise" - a layered casserole much like he describes, only with gravy instead of white sauce, and the surprise is not the cabbage but rather that there are lots of sliced sausages (beef) and onion on the bottom layers.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

Re: kielbasa (none / 1) (#55)
by adamjaskie on Tue May 09, 2006 at 09:16:23 AM EST

Are you sure? Around here, I can go drive to Hamtramick and grab the real stuff, get the almost as good stuff they ship to local high-end grocers, or go to Kroger/Meijer/whatever and grab Hillshire Farms, which is almost as good, but has more preservatives and stuff.

You should be able to find OK Kielbasa (might be marked "Polish Sausage") somewhere around the breakfast sausages, bacon, bologna, and so forth. They are usually U-shaped and vacuum sealed.

[ Parent ]

pretty sure (none / 0) (#56)
by livus on Tue May 09, 2006 at 06:11:13 PM EST

though as I usually go to a butcher so I should take a closer look around the supermarket just in case.

We have only a small polish population in this country. I'm pretty sure I could find it if I go to the main town they're in (which I've been meaning to do anyway).

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

what country (none / 1) (#58)
by adamjaskie on Wed May 10, 2006 at 09:39:58 AM EST

If I may ask?

You want the supermarket stuff anyway for a casserole. It usually isn't as good, but when it is covered up by potatos, cabbage, onions, and white sauce, it really doesn't matter. The fancy butcher case kielbasa are for grilling. Otherwise, ask your butcher. He might be able to source some for you.

In my experience, even non-Polish people like to grill with kielbasa, so they are still avaliable in places like Houghton, where I go to school, where the population is predominatly Finnish. Ann Arbor, my hometown, has a fairly low Polish population, but most of the Detroit area meat packers (many of which are run by Poles) ship their products to area supermarkets.

[ Parent ]

new zealand (none / 0) (#60)
by livus on Wed May 10, 2006 at 08:55:49 PM EST

freight distance means there usually has to be a percieved demand for it before it turns up here. I think my best bet is the local poles. I'm part Polish myself, so the prospect is interesting in any case.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
also (none / 0) (#53)
by livus on Mon May 08, 2006 at 05:51:40 PM EST

a tablespoon of sherry in the white sauce.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
Yikes. for all I know we have (none / 0) (#52)
by livus on Mon May 08, 2006 at 05:48:55 PM EST

something like that here, but it would be in a section of the supermarket I don't really look into.

I prefer smaller potatos too, not least because they're usually newer.  I like pre-washed ones because dirt hides a plethora of defects.

I was thinking that you'd put the sliced potato in there raw, that way it could cook in the juices of the casserole and probably thicken it a bit.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

+1 SP, Sounds good $ (2.50 / 2) (#8)
by akostic on Sat May 06, 2006 at 03:41:35 AM EST


--
"After an indeterminate amount of time trading insane laughter with the retards, I grew curious and tapped on the window." - osm
Casseroles are institutional cooking for the home. (2.66 / 3) (#26)
by IHCOYC on Sat May 06, 2006 at 02:35:33 PM EST

(n/t)
--
"Complecti antecessores tuos in spelæis stygiis Tartari appara," eructavit miles primus.
"Vix dum basiavisti vicarium velocem Mortis," rediit G
LOL! (none / 0) (#29)
by Abominable Abitur on Sat May 06, 2006 at 02:51:39 PM EST

I hadn't thought of it like that.

While growing up my father usually cooked breakfast on weekdays. Usually it was eggs and toast.

My mother usually made dinner. Casseroles were something she could make the night before and my dad would pop it into the oven when he got home (my mother worked further away). The other constant meal was a roast of some kind. At least once a week we had a New England meal; Brown, white, and green. Usually it was beef, rice or potatoes and some kind of steamed vegetable. When we moved to Germany the availability of good beef was slim and we started eating a lot of turkey and chicken. My mother was not working and would spend the days creating masterpieces of culinary delight, yet my favorite meal was this casserole. It IS as institutional as Mother, God and Apple Pie.

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]

Is lasagna a casserole? (none / 0) (#36)
by indubitable on Sat May 06, 2006 at 09:06:34 PM EST

just asking.

What kind of sick fuck doesn't want to roger some dude wearing a bear suit?
[ Parent ]

wow (none / 1) (#40)
by Abominable Abitur on Sun May 07, 2006 at 07:34:33 AM EST

i never thought about this. i would be inclined to say yes, though without some kind of "condensed cream soup" I would be FORCED to say no. Casserole is a very slippery slope, it should not be taken lightly.

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]
Baking Dish (2.66 / 3) (#31)
by rlazur on Sat May 06, 2006 at 04:28:00 PM EST

I'm a little short on cooking implements. What sort of pan/dish is best for the casserole? A glass dish and top?

Thanks for posting this (3.00 / 2) (#32)
by Abominable Abitur on Sat May 06, 2006 at 04:44:16 PM EST

I totally forgot about what kind of dish. Usually you can find a "casserole" dish sold under that name in the U.S. Generally I use a glass/porcelin dish that is about 4" [10cm] deep. I've used metal pans but this dish is tough to clean out of a metal pan.

I've used shallower pans and did not enjoy the dish as much. I've used a large loaf pan which worked okay but you need two to make the full recipe. This dish is very dense when cooked so the shallower pans seem to amplify the density and you end up with something that tastes okay but has a somewhat off-putting density.

I had a slow-cooker (crock-pot) that was awesome for this dish. You could remove the porcelin from the heating element. I could bake the dish and then bring it to work and keep it warm until lunchtime. The last time I used it, I assembled the dish at home and let it cook until lunch in the slow-cooker. I liked it better than if I had baked it because the cheese didn't get crusty on top.

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]

re: cheese browning (none / 1) (#46)
by adamjaskie on Mon May 08, 2006 at 10:39:08 AM EST

For casseroles, I like to sprinkle the top with something (bread crumbs, crumbled chips, something dry and starchy, mixed with a small bit of cheese) and toss it under the broiler for five minutes after cooking until done with a lid on. The bread crumbs insulate the top layer of the casserole from the heat enough to keep it from burning on the top, and the bread crumbs provide a nice crunchy top without being burned and leathery like cheese.

[ Parent ]
Thanks NT (none / 0) (#49)
by rlazur on Mon May 08, 2006 at 12:54:58 PM EST



[ Parent ]
+1 FP (2.00 / 4) (#33)
by creature on Sat May 06, 2006 at 06:26:51 PM EST

For considering the vegans. Thank you.

No problem (none / 1) (#38)
by destroy all monsters on Sun May 07, 2006 at 01:40:51 AM EST

We eat everyone.

"My opinion: You're gay, a troll, a gay troll, or in serious need of antidepressants." - horny smurf to Lemon Juice
[ Parent ]
you're very welcome (none / 1) (#42)
by Abominable Abitur on Sun May 07, 2006 at 07:43:14 AM EST

a co-worker (and dear friend) went from Vegetarian to Vegan about 3 months ago. I always make sure that when we go to lunch (it's a big group) that we go somewhere that will prepare Vegan meals. She says I'm the most considerate person (disregarding man at this ponit) she has ever met.

I told her that I wouldn't be happy without her participation so really I'm a spoiled egoist and she caters to me.

Needless to say, that didn't go over very well.

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]

casserole vs soup (none / 0) (#57)
by NightHwk1 on Tue May 09, 2006 at 10:51:26 PM EST

I typically hate casseroles, probably because I lived off of the tuna + cream of mushroom + noodles variety when I was in college. Possibly more than ramen.

Anyway, something that I absolutely love that sounds similar to this is Chicken Tortilla Soup. You can google it and find a thousand different versions of it, but basically it's chicken, stock, vegetables, spices (cumin, cilantro), peppers, corn tortillas and cheese.

If anyone wants it, I'll write an article on making it from scratch. No cream of anything.

Huh. (none / 0) (#63)
by vectro on Sat May 13, 2006 at 12:32:31 PM EST

They served something called Chicken Tortilla Soup at my college dining hall. So we are reversed: To me, the casserole sounds not bad, but the soup reminds of bad college dining experiences.

“The problem with that definition is just that it's bullshit.” -- localroger
[ Parent ]
hmm (none / 1) (#59)
by waxmop on Wed May 10, 2006 at 08:28:47 PM EST

It would class this recipe way up if you explained how to make the dish without relying on cream of something soup. Next time, explain how to do it right, then say, "if you don't want to do that labor intensive stuff, you can instead use a can of cream of mediocrity soup".

But besides that, thanks for contributing.
--
Saying Java is good because it works on all platforms is like saying anal sex is good because it works on all genders.

huh? (none / 0) (#61)
by Abominable Abitur on Wed May 10, 2006 at 10:16:53 PM EST

The labor is actually more for using "cream of mediocrity" soup. Cream of mediocrity soup is the basis for most casserole/hotdish items.

I mention the fact that I use a box of Portobella Mushroom soup and don't use soup stock. The Portobella is a very rich soup and is very creamy. You could try using a different kind of boxed soup too. I usually find them in the health food section, because many of them are organic.

i actually give quite a few variances on the recipe. it's your job to try things out and figure what you like best.

"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]

I think... (none / 0) (#62)
by vectro on Sat May 13, 2006 at 12:31:27 PM EST

... that the original poster was complaining that your recipe is not really "from scratch", because you use this pre-made soup ingredient. S/he probably feels that the recipe would be more authentic with only simple (ie., non-prepared) ingredients.

Personally, I'm going to quote Steven Hawking: "In order to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe."

“The problem with that definition is just that it's bullshit.” -- localroger
[ Parent ]

Ordinary ingredients (none / 1) (#64)
by adamjaskie on Mon May 15, 2006 at 10:09:51 AM EST

like flour, butter, and milk can be combined and mixed with herbs and spices to act as a base for just about anything. This is ``bechamel'', or white sauce, one of the ``mother sauces'' of French cuisine.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan, and heat until it starts foaming. Add the flour, and whisk over medium heat until it is evenly combined and has darkened SLIGHTLY. You can cook it longer, over low heat, until it is a nice brown colour, but that is a brown sauce, and tastes different (i.e. it has flavour to it, which white sauce doesn't really, other than the herbs/spices you add). Slowly add your (hot - microwave it in your pyrex measuring cup) milk, and, whisking constantly, cook until thickened.

Season with some salt and pepper, and whatever herbs and spices you want. A classic addition is nutmeg, which adds a great flavour even in savory dishes. Thickness can be varied by changing the ratio of butter/flour to milk. You should always use similar amounts of butter and flour, perhaps a little less butter than flour. For a thin sauce, 1 tablespoon each of butter and flour to 1 cup of milk is a good ratio. 1.5 tablespoons flour and 1 tablespoon butter to 1 cup of milk is good for a casserole, 2 tablespoons flour to 1.5 tablespoons butter will make a fairly thick sauce.

You can do any number of things with this. Stir it into soup to make a cream soup (good to thin the sauce a bit by stirring some of the soup into it, then pour the mixture back into the soup), layer it with just about any vegetable and bake to make a gratin, mix some with the meat sauce in lasagna, melt in some cheese and pour over cooked macaroni for homemade macaroni and cheese, or whatever.

It doesn't take much longer, especially once you have done it a few times, is much cheaper, and I sure have a lot more butter, flour, and milk (broth can also be used, but that is a different animal) than condensed cream of * soup. Though, one of my friends once commented, when I was eating a bowl of mushroom soup, ``people eat that? I thought it was only used as an ingredient in casseroles!''

[ Parent ]

First, you make a roux (none / 0) (#66)
by Sgt York on Wed May 17, 2006 at 03:08:56 PM EST

First line of every Cajun recipe. Even the desserts.

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.
[ Parent ]

Re: Roux (none / 0) (#67)
by adamjaskie on Thu May 18, 2006 at 10:16:22 AM EST

Yeah, that is the butter/flour paste part. It is a standard thickener in many types of food.

I find it works better as the second step in most dishes. I like to make the roux after (and using the fat from) the mirepoix (mixture of sauted vegetables that forms the base of flavour - usually onions, carrots, and celery), since it absorbs the flavours of the veggies, and spreads them out better.

[ Parent ]

Is this really cooking? (none / 1) (#65)
by tehcyder on Wed May 17, 2006 at 07:49:59 AM EST

1. Take two or three probably highly-processed and additive-richfood items 2. Put in a dish in layers, if you can be bothered. 3. Heat until you think it's hot enough. Why not just order a fucking pizza and save the washing up?

obviously you're not a golfer (none / 0) (#68)
by Abominable Abitur on Sun May 21, 2006 at 11:05:11 PM EST

define cooking then. oh wait I know:
  • select a good piece of land with suitable water, remove rocks
  • till the soil
  • find seeds (you may have to buy them)
  • plant seeds/ add water
  • grow vegetables and wheat, plus some hay to feed the animals you'll be raising as well.
  • wait
  • tend to animals/crops
  • harvest
  • grind wheat to flour
  • throw it all into a pot
  • bake it
  • eat it
  • clean up


"Terrorism is only a viable "political activist" method for marginalized nutjobs, bottom line. The backlash that it causes makes it intractable for any reasonable ideology. Which is why you don't generally see wild athiest suicide bombers in america's streets." - lonelyhobo
[ Parent ]
i think you forgot some stuff (none / 0) (#69)
by Rhodes on Mon Jun 26, 2006 at 11:38:19 AM EST


  • set up market to trade excess ingredients for others you want
  • as futures market increases profitablility, quite farming
  • as market crashes, start growing grains again


[ Parent ]
Recipe for Tortilla Casserole (Hotdish) | 69 comments (47 topical, 22 editorial, 0 hidden)
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