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The Art of the Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwich

By ktakki in Culture
Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 12:00:00 PM EST
Tags: food, recipies, sandwiches, cooking, muh dick (all tags)
Food

"Sex is like a cheese sandwich. You have it every day and you're like 'Ugh, cheese sandwich'. Go without it for a week and when you have it it's the greatest sandwich in the world" -- Ian Dury

I love sandwiches. Sandwiches are near and dear to my heart. My first K5 comment was about sandwiches. So, here's one of my favorite sandwiches, the grilled ham and cheese.


Ingredients:

  • Two slices of white bread (I use Pepperidge Farm, since it's not as squishy as Wonder Bread)
  • Two slices of Land O' Lakes white American cheese (Muenster or cheddar can be substituted)
  • Six to eight thin slices of Boars Head Black Forest smoked ham
  • Optional: two tablespoons of Alouette or Boursin spreadable soft garlic and herb cheese
  • One tablespoon of butter, divided in half
  • Dijon mustard (Grey Poupon or the equivalent)

Spread a thin layer of dijon mustard on the bread, followed by a slice of American cheese. Then lay the slices of ham over the cheese, folding the ends that overlap the bread towards the middle of the slice (ideally, you want a sandwich with nothing sticking out from between the slices). Halfway through your six or eight slices of ham, spread the garlic and herb cheese over the middle slice of ham.

Once your sandwich is assembled, heat a small non-stick skillet over a medium flame. Add half of the tablespoon of butter; when the butter is spread across the surface of the skillet and starts to bubble, place the sandwich in the pan. Put a small, heatproof plate on top of the sandwich and then place a medium-sized saucepan half-filled with water on top of this so it presses down on the sandwich. It doesn't have to be a plate and a saucepan: a brick covered in aluminum foil will work just as well. Cook the sandwich for about three or four minutes, or until the cheese is melted and the bread is golden brown.

Remove the sandwich from the skillet and remove the skillet from the heat. Add the remaining butter to the pan and swirl it around the skillet so it spreads and bubbles but does not burn. Once the butter bubbles, flip the sandwich into the skillet and replace the weight. Again, cook for three to four minutes. When this side is done, remove the sandwich and cut it in half, diagonally.

When I make this for dinner, I have something on the side, like potato chips and a dill pickle, some roasted red pepper and pimento olives, or tortilla chips and salsa. Soup makes a very good companion to this sandwich, especially something hearty, like tomato, potato, or minestrone.

You can substitute bacon for smoked ham (omitting the spreadable cheese layer), but it's somewhat dry without the addition of tomato slices.

Bon appetit!

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Poll
Favorite sandwich?
o Grilled cheese 8%
o BLT 13%
o Club 8%
o PBJ 7%
o Fluffernutter 0%
o Reuben 13%
o Pastrami 7%
o Steak/roast beef 8%
o Chicken 1%
o Turkey 1%
o Tuna/tuna melt 8%
o Two hung black studs and a petite blonde chick 16%
o Shit 2%

Votes: 67
Results | Other Polls

Related Links
o first K5 comment
o Also by ktakki


Display: Sort:
The Art of the Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwich | 78 comments (68 topical, 10 editorial, 0 hidden)
-1 not kosher (2.83 / 12) (#1)
by nombre on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 07:29:09 PM EST

WOW, YOU CAN SUBSTITUTE SWINE FOR SWINE? GO FIGURE!

And yet (3.00 / 2) (#5)
by Spendocrat on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 07:51:31 PM EST

A pork chop would be highly innapropriate.

[ Parent ]
Not to mention very crunchy (none / 0) (#17)
by BadDoggie on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 06:59:20 AM EST


woof.

"Eppur si muove." -- Galileo Galilei
"Nevertheless, it moves."
[ Parent ]

you could use smoked salmon (3.00 / 4) (#10)
by livus on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 10:42:21 PM EST

but let's face it, this sandwich sounds disgusting and it would be a waste of salmon.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
grilled cheese (3.00 / 2) (#24)
by rhiannon on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 06:23:44 PM EST

are good without any meat

-----------------------------------------
I continued to rebuff the advances... so many advances... of so many attractive women. -MC
[ Parent ]
Are You Serious? (none / 0) (#56)
by Xptic on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 06:51:00 PM EST

Jews have given up on animal sacrifice, stoning their children, and making their wives sleep in the barn when they menstrate.

So why do they still insist that pork is a filthy meat?

[ Parent ]

Jews (none / 1) (#63)
by ShiftyStoner on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 01:43:04 PM EST

They made their wives sleep in the barn during their period? That's awesome. I have a new found respect for these jews. Now I almost feel sorry for them.

 
( @ )'( @ ) The broad masses of a population are more amenable to the appeal of rhetoric than to any other force. - Adolf Hitler
[ Parent ]

Sleeping appart... (none / 0) (#77)
by Niha on Thu Aug 24, 2006 at 02:53:34 PM EST

 Women were considered impure during their period. I think that, if people believed then on absurd taboos about period and personal hygiene, they were impure in fact (not that period is impure by itself, but lack of washing can lead to that state).
 I'm really thankful of living in a time with, at least, less taboos...

[ Parent ]
I've wondered this myself... (none / 0) (#73)
by ktakki on Thu Aug 17, 2006 at 10:05:50 PM EST

Being Jewish, I've wondered this myself at times.

The animal sacrifice thing fell out of favor after the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem. Priests gave way to rabbis, sacrifice gave way to prayer. The faith became portable, and the Temple, where unblemished bullocks were sacrificed, was replaced by the Torah, a book.

The more onerous commandments mentioned in Leviticus, like the ones about stoning, menstruation, wearing garments weaved with different fibers, planting two crops in one field, seemed to have faded away due to practicality and the realities of the Diaspora.

As for keeping Kosher, things like avoiding swine and shellfish, eating meat from Kosher butchers, not mixing meat and dairy, keeping two sets of dishes, I think that the ease of complying with these dietary laws has led to their endurance, though only the Orthodox observe these. Plus, there's a commercial aspect: a whole lot of Kosher butchers would be out of work.

Me, I was raised in a Reform household, and though I didn't eat pork chops until I was out of the house, my mother cooked bacon, we only had one set of dishes, and a salami and cheese sandwich was perfectly okay. There's a running joke about Reform Jews: pork is trayfe (not Kosher) unless it's served in a Chinese restaurant.

On the other hand, if my rabbi knew I posted a story about "The Art of the Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwich", he'd have kittens.

But then he'd ask to try one.


k.
--
"In spite of everything, I still believe that people
are really good at heart." - Anne Frank

[ Parent ]

Ahem. (3.00 / 3) (#75)
by shm on Sun Aug 20, 2006 at 08:38:35 AM EST

if my rabbi knew I posted a story about "The Art of the Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwich", he'd have kittens. But then he'd ask to try one.

Kittens aren't kosher either, are they?


[ Parent ]

sandw+1ch (3.00 / 7) (#2)
by Empedocles on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 07:30:01 PM EST



---
And I think it's gonna be a long long time
'Till touch down brings me 'round again to find
I'm not the man they think I am at home

+1 does not mention... (3.00 / 5) (#3)
by mybostinks on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 07:46:40 PM EST

velveeta, margerine or anything called low-fat.

well, velveeta is a processed cheese spread (none / 1) (#12)
by agavero on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 11:41:55 PM EST

with lots of additives and a high concentration of salt. very tasty tho! but not technically a cheese.
"Our knowledge is a little island in a great ocean of nonknowledge." Isaac Bashevis Singer
[ Parent ]
And nothing like those Land O' Lakes cheese slices (3.00 / 2) (#18)
by BadDoggie on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 07:03:21 AM EST

INGREDIENTS: Cultured Pasteurized Milk And Skim Milk, Sweet Whey, Reduced Lactose Whey, Milkfat, Salt, Contains Less Than 2% Of Sodium Citrate, Tricalcium Phosphate, Milk Protein Concentrate, Sodium Phosphate, Sorbic Acid (Preservative), Artificial Color, Lactic Acid, Enzymes.

woof.

"Eppur si muove." -- Galileo Galilei
"Nevertheless, it moves."
[ Parent ]

I for one (3.00 / 14) (#4)
by zenofchai on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 07:50:56 PM EST

am glad to see such an important topic discussed at length by the K5 giants.

butter BOTH sides or you are an INFIDEL.

shredded cheese, while tasty in theory is an ABOMINATION and ye shall cast it out.

thou shalt use TWO slices; neither more, nor less; of AMERICAN pre-sliced cheese. One slice shall be at at 15 degree angle, the other at 75 degree angle, so that all 4 corners from both slices are clearly visible outside the bread outline.

if thou cuttest off thy crust, thou shalt gouge thine eyes out. verily.

if cheese melts off and onto the frying pan, thou must suffer thy hand to pick it from the fire.

etc.
--
The K5 Interactive Political Compass SVG Graph

American cheese? (3.00 / 2) (#6)
by sudog on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 08:33:14 PM EST

You mean American oil-based petroleum-product-tasting gutter-sludge? That vile stuff?

Gross.

And are you talking about "actual" American cheddar or the soft, gooey disgusting crap called Kraft Singles?


[ Parent ]

No, not that orange Kraft crap... (3.00 / 2) (#7)
by ktakki on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 08:41:04 PM EST

I specified white Land O' Lakes for a reason. It's thin enough that it melts before the bread has a chance to burn. Yes, it's packaged in individually wrapped slices, but unlike that petrochemical Kraft crap it tastes like cheese.

Sure, you could use whole-grain bread and Stilton cheese from your local Whole Foods outlet, but it's not going to be the same sandwich.


k.
--
"In spite of everything, I still believe that people
are really good at heart." - Anne Frank

[ Parent ]

Not only not the same sandwhich but better tasting (2.40 / 5) (#19)
by tdillo on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 09:47:47 AM EST

as well.

And I luvs me some Grilled Ham & Cheese but ya know its got to be ham and cheese not processed cheese-like product.

[ Parent ]

so many good cheeses (none / 1) (#78)
by iggymanz on Fri Aug 25, 2006 at 11:47:29 AM EST

taste wonderful in a grilled sandwich, especially if olive-oiled and fried on the side first.  why oh why defile a sandwich with milkfat emulsified, oversalted and processed to a cheeselike consistency?

[ Parent ]
Gruyre (3.00 / 3) (#55)
by Xptic on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 06:48:07 PM EST

Really.  When you cook, gruyère is the only choice.

I butter a slice of bread and place it on a medium-low skillet.

On goes a slice of gruyère, maybe 1/8" thick.

Next, a few layers of prosciutto.

Now, another slice of gruyère.

Finally, I butter another slice of bread and drop that bad boy on top.  Crank up the heat to med-high and let her go for about 3 minutes.

Flip, press, and wait another 3 minutes.

[ Parent ]

somewhat sad (none / 1) (#59)
by zenofchai on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 10:05:15 PM EST

that this is my highest-rated comment ever.
--
The K5 Interactive Political Compass SVG Graph
[ Parent ]
No dude. (none / 1) (#64)
by ShiftyStoner on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 01:49:17 PM EST

It's fucking funny, but it really says something doesn't it. Whats sad is this story is on the front page. Meanwhile Tex's judge of death was tossed in the gutter.

 
( @ )'( @ ) The broad masses of a population are more amenable to the appeal of rhetoric than to any other force. - Adolf Hitler
[ Parent ]

this isn't FP (none / 1) (#65)
by zenofchai on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 01:50:46 PM EST

it's posted to section.
--
The K5 Interactive Political Compass SVG Graph
[ Parent ]
Swiss cheese, I say! (none / 0) (#71)
by tgibbs on Wed Aug 16, 2006 at 05:17:33 PM EST

About the only thing that Swiss is good for.

And bacon, definitely bacon. Perhaps the most unhealthy sandwich of all time. But goood.

[ Parent ]

+1 slice of Life (3.00 / 4) (#11)
by livus on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 10:43:45 PM EST

I can't believe you eat that, much less for dinner. Foul.

Nevertheless I shall vote it up as it is +1 informative.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

ham and cheese sandwiches are great! (3.00 / 4) (#13)
by agavero on Fri Aug 11, 2006 at 11:47:53 PM EST

i dont care for the dijon mustard tho, and i butter/marg both sides of the bread before putting in the pan, then just flip it over when the first side is toasted a nice brown. i use "old" cheddar which is nice and strong. yummy!! making me hungry!
"Our knowledge is a little island in a great ocean of nonknowledge." Isaac Bashevis Singer
For all my sandwiches... (3.00 / 4) (#14)
by ivancruz on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 12:42:47 AM EST

ciabatta bread. No other came close.

Ivan.

______________________________________
Eu vou, eu vou vender a minha v, Eu vou vender a minha v, A minha v filosofia.(Zeca Baleiro)

yeah (none / 1) (#23)
by livus on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 05:48:45 PM EST

ciabatta and brie if you're going to use ham. Hell why not just make a panini.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
1 panino, 2 panini, 3 panini, 4 (none / 1) (#41)
by ImpulseBuyer on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 07:56:05 AM EST



[ Parent ]
thnx (none / 1) (#57)
by livus on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 07:23:51 PM EST

that will really annoy people in cafes.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
Ham and Cheese (none / 0) (#54)
by Xptic on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 06:42:56 PM EST

For the bread, go with something good.  Whole wheat or a softer rye is really great for grilled cheese.

As for the ham, you just have to go with prosciutto.  It's very expensive and maybe a bit too salty for some tastes.  A good mustard and maybe some cracked peppercorns will even out the taste.

As for cheese, Gruyère is really the only choice.  It's a bit harsh when raw, but it's still one of the finest cooking cheeses around.

[ Parent ]

not for me (none / 0) (#58)
by livus on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 07:29:27 PM EST

Gruyere is overrated.

I also prefer certain free-range organic manuka ham, because I don't like to eat concentration-camp pig meat.

To be honest I would never make a grilled ham and cheese sandwich anyway. If I want to eat ham and cheese I will use brie and some kind of pastry.

If I want to eat a grilled cheese sandwich I will be using tomatoes, capers or gherkins, wholegrain mustard, and worcester sauce.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

Eletist (3.00 / 2) (#62)
by Xptic on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 06:50:03 AM EST

While I applaud your taste, to say you'll never enjoy a grilled ham and cheese is a bit elitist.

You should never choose the food you'll eat from its origins.  Grilled ham and chese is, really, the best that simple food has to offer.

[ Parent ]

No man. (none / 0) (#66)
by ShiftyStoner on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 01:54:18 PM EST

French toast is the best. And, and roast beef and peanut butter sandwiches. And chili buritos. They go great together.

 
( @ )'( @ ) The broad masses of a population are more amenable to the appeal of rhetoric than to any other force. - Adolf Hitler
[ Parent ]

Hypocrite (none / 0) (#68)
by livus on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 04:39:25 PM EST

surely the ham toasted sandwich (as we would call it over here) is more elitist than the simple hunk of bread and cheese which I prefer.

Besides, I didn't say I would "never enjoy" it - I said I would never bother making it.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

I prefer a (3.00 / 7) (#16)
by rhiannon on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 03:48:29 AM EST

decidedly more upscale ham and cheese sandwich, with actual cheese and natural whole wheat, but I applaud your efforts. Good idea with the alouette/boursin spread too, I haven't heard of that one.

A note: it is important to choose a heat low enough to spread throughout the sandwich and melt the cheese before you burn the bread. This might seem obvious but quite a few of the homemade grilled cheese sandwiches I get end up either with a chunk of unmelted cheese or a burnt crust, which is bullshit. According to my girlfriend, who went to the CIA(majoring in grilled cheese) it's best to butter after you heat the skillet or else the pan won't heat evenly. Also, you are using entirely too little butter, I would double the amount, applying most to the bread and a bit to the pan.

And for the final touch, a dash of garlic powder and basil, mmmmmm.

-----------------------------------------
I continued to rebuff the advances... so many advances... of so many attractive women. -MC

cheese intelligence agency? (2.87 / 8) (#22)
by nombre on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 01:43:50 PM EST



[ Parent ]
Culinary Institute of America (none / 0) (#52)
by thefirelane on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 06:08:16 PM EST



-
Prube.com: Like K5, but with less point.
[ Parent ]
Butter the Bread (none / 1) (#53)
by Xptic on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 06:37:03 PM EST

Heating butter in a skillet is a fine art.  If you place cold butter on a hot skillet, the butter will bubble, pop, smoke, and generally taste nasty.  If you put butter into a cold skillet, then warm the skillet, the second side of the sandwich will be nasty.

The answer?

Butter the bread vice the skillet.  Personally, I like to use sprayable butter.  However, I'm usually making like 10 samiches for the family.  If you are a one-off worker, then place a few pats of butter in the microwave for a few seconds to soften them.  Then, spread them on the bread.

[ Parent ]

Well it's not exactly an art is it? (none / 1) (#21)
by zootropic on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 11:32:26 AM EST



+1, recipes for the obvious (3.00 / 2) (#26)
by creature on Sat Aug 12, 2006 at 07:45:57 PM EST

Who wouldn't be delighted?

-1 no technology (2.40 / 5) (#28)
by loteck on Sun Aug 13, 2006 at 12:34:42 AM EST

or culture

or trenches
--
"You're in tune to the musical sound of loteck hi-fi, the musical sound that moves right round. Keep on moving ya'll." -Mylakovich
"WHAT AN ETERNAL MOBIUS STRIP OF FELLATIATIC BANALITY THIS IS." -Harry B Otch

i prefer olive oil to butter (n/t) (none / 1) (#30)
by Delirium on Sun Aug 13, 2006 at 11:23:59 AM EST



Yes, I have tried that and it is very (3.00 / 2) (#32)
by mybostinks on Sun Aug 13, 2006 at 03:56:17 PM EST

good if you used the dark virgin kind. Just as delicious as butter.

[ Parent ]
What? (2.80 / 5) (#33)
by debacle on Sun Aug 13, 2006 at 04:03:40 PM EST

American cheese?
White bread?
No tomato?

STFU man, learn to fucking make grilled cheese.

It tastes sweet.

IandI likes roasted lamb (none / 1) (#34)
by IandI on Sun Aug 13, 2006 at 04:34:15 PM EST

my own favorite is a freshly slaughtered young white lamb it is cooked over open fire with seasonings and, man oh mon, it IS tasting so good! Later soem ppl like putting that meat into a roll of pankace and cheese from the goat too but not IandI who like it all fresh adn bloddy by itself.

deagol? (none / 0) (#35)
by actmodern on Sun Aug 13, 2006 at 04:42:33 PM EST

that you?

--
LilDebbie challenge: produce the water sports scene from bable or stfu. It does not exist.
[ Parent ]
u must be crazy mon (none / 0) (#60)
by IandI on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 01:34:47 AM EST

I not knowing what is a deagol.

[ Parent ]
Substitue olive oil... (none / 0) (#37)
by SvnLyrBrto on Sun Aug 13, 2006 at 09:12:22 PM EST

.... for the butter... tis much better.  And instead of futzing around with a the skillet, I just stick the sucker in the George Foreman grill.  Works great.

cya,
john

Imagine all the people...

American Cheese? (none / 0) (#40)
by Gerhard on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 07:21:30 AM EST

What type of cheese is "white American cheese"?

It's what you find (none / 1) (#48)
by spasticfraggle on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 02:19:52 PM EST

on the end of a white American's di... oh never mind...

--
I'm the straw that broke the camel's back!
[ Parent ]
I've been reading K5 for years (1.00 / 4) (#42)
by acidzebra on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 09:08:30 AM EST

but I never bothered to create an account.

But this line:
"When I make this for dinner"
put me over the edge.

a) the thing you're describing in such a circumspect way is called a tosti and can be made in a few minutes without a page-long description; in fact, anyone over the age of 10 is probably able to figure this one out.
b) IT IS NOT, AND I REPEAT NOT DINNER. Unless you're a student, and even then it's doubtful.

it is indeed dinner.. or at least it is tonight $ (none / 0) (#49)
by emmons on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 05:14:48 PM EST



---
In the beginning the universe was created. This has made a lot of people angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.
-Douglas Adams

[ Parent ]
Toasted sandwich infidels, unite! (none / 1) (#43)
by MyrdemInggala on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 10:22:58 AM EST

I call it a toasted sandwich. Other people where I live call it a snackwich -- a terrible habit of which I deeply disapprove.

I make them in a sandwich maker; in this isolated case I believe the specialised tool is far superior to more generic cooking utensils.

I just wipe the sandwich maker clean with a paper tissue afterwards, so that it's always slightly greasy, but I never put butter on the outside of the sandwich, because then it drips with grease and is disgusting. It really isn't necessary; the tiny amount of grease on the teflon surface of the sandwich maker is sufficient to prevent sticking.

It really doesn't matter what cheese you use. Seriously. As long as it is relatively solid and isn't full of water. You can even use brie or camembert or ricotta, if you really want to, although it will be a bit weird. And salami is a tasty, yet underappreciated, addition. I don't know why everyone is so fixated on ham; other pork products are being neglected.

I concur that it is probably not a good idea to have this for dinner, unless it's a very infrequent treat.


-- 22. No matter how tempted I am with the prospect of unlimited power, I will not consume any energy field bigger than my head. -- Evil Overlord List
Dinner of kings. (none / 1) (#45)
by scart on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 11:05:34 AM EST

I also prefer the sandwich maker to a skillet. You get a much more even heat and you are guaranteed to melt the cheese before the bread burns.

Two month matured cheddar works best for me. It has a strong enough taste that you don't need mustard, but it won't clash with the meat.

I've had very nice results using ham, shredded tuna and cheddar on whole wheat bread.

There is no better dinner than a few of these sandwiches with a large mug of thick cream of chicken soup.

[ Parent ]

Mild vs mature cheese (none / 1) (#50)
by gidds on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 05:15:08 PM EST

For eating raw, I prefer my cheese as strong as possible. Extra-extra-extra-mature cheddar, yum yum. The sort you can still taste half an hour later. (As long as it's not mouldy. Blue cheese is an abomination.)

But, having tried for years, I've come to the conclusion that strong cheese just doesn't cook as well. It separates far too readily; the solid burns too easily, and the oil sticks to your tongue and burns it, plus it's hours before your mouth stops feeling oily.

So although you wouldn't catch me eating mild cheddar raw, I find it works well in toasties and other meals. Add something else for taste (Worcestershire sauce works well), but the mild cheese gives the right consistency, and cooks well without burning.

(Of course, this is 'mild' in cheddar terms. It still has some taste and texture. I think I tried some 'mild American cheese' once; over here it'd fall foul of the Trades Descriptions Act.)


Andy/
[ Parent ]

WIPO : Cheese & Tomato (none / 1) (#44)
by daveybaby on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 10:33:36 AM EST

Has to be really strong cheddar. Granary bread or white doorstop depending on mood/availability. Little bit of mayo. Teeeny bit of salt on the tomato. Shitloads of black pepper. Fresh basil if ya got some. Nice.

You need an electric grill... (none / 0) (#46)
by claes on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 11:34:28 AM EST

like This and then you can make 4 at once. The newer grills aren't as hot as my mom's, so you've got to toast the bread slightly so that it doesn't get squished flat.

As an aside, I had a toasted bree and smoked turkey sandwitch over the weekend. It was pretty darned good.

-- claes

With a 1500 watt microwave, (none / 1) (#47)
by it certainly is on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 12:30:14 PM EST

a melted cheese sandwich is only 15 seconds away.

kur0shin.org -- it certainly is

Godwin's law [...] is impossible to violate except with an infinitely long thread that doesn't mention nazis.

...with soggy bread... (none / 0) (#51)
by gidds on Mon Aug 14, 2006 at 05:18:32 PM EST

...cheese that doesn't cook properly before it oozes all round the plate, and no taste.

I don't have the patience to work out how to get the electric grill working properly, so I've had many goes at microwave toasties. But if there's a knack to it, I've yet to discover it.


Andy/
[ Parent ]

it certainly is (none / 1) (#67)
by ShiftyStoner on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 01:58:21 PM EST

discusting

 
( @ )'( @ ) The broad masses of a population are more amenable to the appeal of rhetoric than to any other force. - Adolf Hitler
[ Parent ]

Absolute rubbish. (2.33 / 3) (#61)
by cburke on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 02:01:40 AM EST

Okay, first off, American cheese is not cheese.  Cheese is a dairy product.  Cheese is made from milk.  Any type of cheese whose producers advertise how much milk they use in their product, and who use slogans like "how do they get the milk inside the cheese?!" is not cheese.

So substitute shitty American "cheese" with some kind of real cheese.  I perosonally like colby-jack, but plain Monterey Jack is good as would be others such as cheddar as you say.

Second, white bread?  The American cheese of breads.  Okay, it's at least made of actual wheat, but it's basically an attempt to suck all natural flavor out of the wheat and make it taste as artificial as possible.  

The bread I can forgive, but seriously...  A recipe that suggests real garlic, real smoked hame, real butter, Dijon mustard, but American cheese?  That's like a dating advice column that gives great advice on places to go and things to say and do, but recommends going home to your Real Doll for the real action.  It's a grilled cheese sandwich, okay?

Open your eyes... (none / 1) (#69)
by ktakki on Tue Aug 15, 2006 at 10:46:00 PM EST

Do you seriously think that the butter, the garlic and herb spread, or the Black Forest ham is any less processed than the white bread and "white American cheese"? They're all pumped full of preservatives (the ham, especially, with sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite).

But that's besides the point. This is "comfort food", something I ate as a kid (albeit updated with some improvements, like a better bread than Wonder and better "cheese" than Kraft Singles). It's a once-a-week light meal, fast and easy to prepare.

Tonight I grilled marinated steak tips with locally-grown vegetables (onions, peppers, tomatoes) bought from a farmer's market. But if it had rained this evening (I grill on my deck), I'd have made a grilled ham and cheese sangwich. And liked it.

Sometimes I eat ramen, even though I can afford filet mignon. I like ramen. Guess what? There's no accounting for taste.

If someone said that I could eat (for free!) Chilean sea bass, chicken marsala, veal picatta, assorted sushi, grilled lobster tails, pan-fried bluefish, or a grilled New York sirloin, I'd still want a ham and cheese once each week. Because I like it.


k.
--
"In spite of everything, I still believe that people
are really good at heart." - Anne Frank

[ Parent ]

Good question (none / 0) (#70)
by cburke on Wed Aug 16, 2006 at 03:33:27 PM EST

Do you seriously think that the butter, the garlic and herb spread, or the Black Forest ham is any less processed than the white bread and "white American cheese"? They're all pumped full of preservatives (the ham, especially, with sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite).

Are the additives higher on the ingredient list than the the food type advertised on the packaging?  

Yeah, just about everything has been processed somehow, but we're talking orders of magnitude difference here.  When they add preservatives to the herb spread, they don't remove half of what makes the garlic garlic.

That's the difference between white bread or cheese food, and ham that won't make you sick because it spent a week getting from the packing plant to your grocer.

I have no problem with your tastes, it just struck me as incongruous.  It'd be like if you said "sometimes I eat ramen, even though i can afford filet mignon, but I do like to add Russian caviar to the ramen".  

[ Parent ]

Cheese and Onion Grilled Sammich (none / 1) (#72)
by Gruntathon on Wed Aug 16, 2006 at 10:25:46 PM EST

Is also awesome. Give it a try sometime. You have put the onion (I use brown) in raw and thinly chopped before cooking, and then some good cheddar. Some salt and pepper doesn't go astray either.

The focus of the taste is on the cheddar with the under-cooked onion to give it some kick, so a high cheese to onion ratio is recommended.
__________
If they hadn't been such quality beasts (despite being so young) it would have been a nightmare - good self-starting, capable hands are your finest friend. -- Anonymous CEO
Fried, not grilled. (none / 0) (#74)
by opusman on Fri Aug 18, 2006 at 11:20:49 PM EST

For extra obesity calorie goodness.


Marmite (none / 0) (#76)
by pmgolz on Mon Aug 21, 2006 at 09:43:11 AM EST

This may be controversial, but add marmite to the above recipe (replace the mustard, or not, as you will) and it will taste a million times better. Better still, just have a marmite and cheese toasted sandwich.

For those unfortunate people in the world who don't know about marmite, it's a dark brown, viscous, yeasty spread that tastes phenomenal on just about anything. Australians: vegemite doesn't even come close.
------
Enthios

The Art of the Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwich | 78 comments (68 topical, 10 editorial, 0 hidden)
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