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[P]
A Peek At The '50s

By oldwinebottle in Culture
Tue May 22, 2007 at 12:00:00 PM EST
Tags: music, war, life (all tags)
Music

As the 1950's began, thoughts of another war were weighing heavily on the minds of the population of Canada. There was unrest between North and South Korea and a war appeared likely.

Television was the big new entertainment factor in the '50s. Although American television stations were available for viewing near the Canadian border for several years, the first entity to begin broadcasting in Canada was the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in September of 1952. In late 1953, private CBC affiliate stations soon began to arrive. At this time, all stations were to be affiliated with CBC as this was the only television network operating in Canada.


Milton Berle, Sid Caesar, Ed Sullivan, Jack Parr and Edward R. Morrow became household figures and variety shows were number one on television. Get-rich-quick instincts were fed by quiz programs that grew bigger and bigger until the bubble burst with the revelation that some of the most popular shows were rigged.

The $64,000 Question

The $64,000 Question was one of these programs and it began as a summer replacement program in 1954. It was based on the 1940's quiz program, Take It, Or Leave It, with its $64 question. Revlon was the major sponsor and it was shown on CBS.

Contestants answered questions starting at the $64 level and increased their prize to $128. - $256 - $512 - $1,000 - $2,000 - $4,000 Once they reached their prize of $4,000,00 they were free to quit at anytime. After reaching the $8,000 question and missing, they would take home an additional consolation prize of a new Cadillac. Many of the early contestants were made into instant "superstars."

Regular contestants, appearing over a long period of time, made the $64,000 quiz show very popular. It also became the downfall for this program in 1958. Sponsors demanded that popular contestants be given the answers in advance enabling them to beat the unpopular contestants so they could be on the show for longer periods.

Word got out that cheating was going on, but none of the allegations were ever substantiated. Ratings declined and the show was canceled.    
Because of this scandal, program production took control and completely eliminated sponsor-controlled programming.

The Korean War

The Korean War, also known as the "Forgotten War," began on June 24th, 1950 and cease fire wasn't until July 27th, 1953.

This war began when communist North Korea invaded capitalistic South Korea. The major support for North Korea was China, with support also given by the Soviets with advice, arms and military pilots.

South Korea was supported by the United Nations forces, which were made up mainly of the United States. Many other nations also contributed personnel.

Troop strengths:
Peak strength for the UNC was 932,964 on July 27, 1953 -- the day the Armistice Agreement was signed:

    * Republic of Korea 590,911
    * Colombia 1,068
    * United States 302,483
    * Belgium 900
    * United Kingdom 14,198
    * Canada 6,146
    * South Africa 826
    * The Netherlands 819
    * Turkey 5,453
    * Luxembourg 44
    * Australia 2,282
    * Philippines 1,496
    * New Zealand 1,385
    * Thailand 1,204
    * Ethiopia 1,271
    * Greece 1,263
    * France 1,119

On June 25th, 1950, behind a barrage of artillery fire, the North Korean army crossed the 38th parallel into South Korea. The well-planned attack with about 135,000 troops, was quick and achieved surprise and quick successes. This was the beginning of the Korean War.

Within days, South Korean forces were outgunned, outnumbered and were often in full retreat or defected to the North. The North at this time, hoped for a quick surrender but this did not happen due to the intervention of foreign powers. They did not expect America to enter the war so quickly and their defenses were unprepared for American air attacks.

On the afternoon of June 25th, the Security Council of the United Nations met and called for the immediate end of the hostilities and withdrawal of the North Korean forces to the 38th parallel. North Korea had no intention of obeying this order. At the time, President Truman of the United States, ordered the United States Navy and Air Force to support South Korea.

The commitment of American troops was given by President Truman, as other UN members also offered forces. The Security Council recommended all troops be under a single commander and the commander named was General Douglas MacArthur of the United States. This United Nations Command was based in Tokyo.

These UN forces, recaptured Seoul and moved past the 38th parallel advancing towards the border of Manchuria. Then Communist China intervened and these forces launched a massive offensive which drove the UN and South Korean armies back across the 38th Parallel and well to the south.

The Royal Canadian Navy were the first Canadian troops to aid the UN forces. Three Canadian destroyers were dispatched on July 12, 1950. HMCS Cayuga, HMCS Athabaskan and HMCS Sioux, were dispatched to Korean waters to serve under United Nations Command. These ships played a very important part in the evacuation of American troops who were cut off in the Chinnampo area following a retreat to the south. The three Canadian destroyers, together with an Australian and an American destroyer, negotiated the difficult Taedong river to successfully cover this evacuation.

Also in July, a Royal Canadian Air Force squadron was assigned to air transport duties for the UN. Regularly scheduled flights were flown between McChord Air Force Base, Washington and Haneda Airfield in Tokyo.

On August 7, 1950, as the Korean crisis deepened, the Government authorized a specially trained and equipped Canadian Army Special Force. This Force was to carry out Canada's obligation under the United Nations Charter of the North Atlantic Pact.

Following the UN successes of September and October, the war in Korea appeared to be nearing its end. Instead of a full brigade, only the 2nd battalion of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, proceeded to Korea.

By the time the troopship steamed into Yokohama on December 14th, 1950, the picture had completely changed once again. Communist China had intervened leaving an atmosphere of unexpected disaster.

The war went on. There were raids and counter-raids, mines and booby traps, bombing casualties and endless patrolling.

A truce in Korea finally came when the Korean Armistice Agreement was signed on July 27th, 1953. This truce was an uneasy truce, but showed the international forces had effectively stemmed the aggression in Korea. The UN emerged from the crises with an enhanced prestige.

Reported by the United Nations, "in a green field at Tanggok, located near the port of Pusan, stand myriad reminders of the Korean War. Simple white crosses, standing near the sign of the "Crescent and the Star" and the "Star of David" are bleak, symbolic representatives of the 33,629 Americans, numberless Koreans, 717 Turkish soldiers, and 1,109 soldiers of the United Kingdom who gave their lives during the struggle. Also sharing this place of honor are the symbols for the dead of the 12 other nations whose fighting men died to keep Korea free."

The '50s Move On

The loud and raucous sound of rock 'n' roll filled the land to such extent that many established songwriters, finding the kind of tunes they usually composed could no longer get a hearing, went into temporary retirement. Elvis Presley, grinding his hips and flailing a guitar, emerged as the new popular singing star while Frank Sinatra, who had been the Presley of the '40s until his singing carer went into a decline, made a startling comeback as a movie actor in From Here to Eternity, a comeback which also returned him to favour as a singer. Folk music, which preciously had only a small number of devotees, reached a mass audience through the performances of the Weavers, Harry Belefonte and the Kingston Trio. Jazz, too, became fashionable, spurred by jazz festivals at Newport, Rhode Island, and Monterey, California. In serious music Van Cliburn won acclaim in the Soviet Union and Maria Callas stormed in and out of the Metropolitan Opera.

James Dean had one of the shortest careers in Hollywood. He made three films in just over a year, "Rebel Without A Cause," "East of Eden" and "Giant." He was killed in a highway accident on September 30th, 1955. He was also nominated for two academy awards for his performances in "East of Eden," and "Giant."

Joe Hyams, in the James Dean biography "Little Boy Lost," sums up his career:
"..There is no simple explanation for why he has come to mean so much to so many people today. Perhaps it is because, in his acting, he had the intuitive talent for expressing the hopes and fears that are a part of all young people... In some movie magic way, he managed to dramatize brilliantly the questions every young person in every generation must resolve."

Children and adults swung their hips in reckless circles to support hula hoops. Bulky-knit sweaters were worn by both sexes, while the use of colour and individuality - even eccentricity - became more pronounced in men's clothing.

On March 30, 1954, Canada's first subway train started operations in Toronto, Ontario and in the same year ground was broken for almighty power project on the St. Lawrence Seaway development.

Sounds of the 50s

Mister Sandman bounced into popularity on the strength of a recording that was made by The Chordettes in 1954. The Chordettes were four girls who first gained attention as a female barbershop quartet. They became regular members of Arthur Godfrey's radio and television show.

Wonderland by Night introduced the distinctive styling of the German arranger and conductor, Bert Kaempfert, on this side of the Atlantic. Because a clean, ringing trumpet solo, played over a gently coaxing beat, was featured on the Kaempfert recording and others that followed it to the United States, many listeners assumed that Kaempfert was the trumpeter. Kaaempfert is a versatile musician - he plays piano, clarinet, saxophone and accordion - but trumpet is one instrument he does not play. Charlie Tabbor was the trumpeter on the first Kaempfert hit.

It's Not for Me to Say in 1957 that Johnny Mathis was going to be one of the most popular singers of his generation. Coming along at a time when rock 'n roll had blocked out practically all other kinds of music, Mathis' recording of this gentle ballad had such appeal that more than a million copies were sold. He introduced the song in a motion picture, Lizzie, in which he appeared briefly in a nightclub scene. The sales of his record of the song were actually greater than the box-office returns from the movie.

Jamaica Farewell is one of the West Indian songs with which Harry Belafonte had tremendous success in the 1950's. Many of these songs were either work songs or lighthearted calypsos but "Jamaica Farewell" had an appealing tenderness that set it apart from the others. It was adapted from a traditional West Indies folk song by Irving Burgie, whose professional and calypsonic name was Lord Burgess.

I Almost Lost My Mind has gone through a quick series of successes that cover the range of popular music in the 1950s. It was written in 1950 by Ivory Joe Hunter, a pianist, bandleader and blues singer, whose rhythm-and-blues version of the tune became a hit. Within a couple of years, several singers in the country-and-western field gave it new popularity. Then in 1956, it became a hit for the third time in less than a decade when Pat Boone recorded it as a straightforward ballad.

Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White was composed in 1950 as a love theme for a French film, Underwater. Although it was popular in France, where it was played as a ballad, it did not catch on even with English lyrics, until 1955 when Perez Prado turned it into a cha-cha and inserted the series of long, squeezed trumpet notes that never failed to hold a listener's attention.

February 3rd, 1959 was the "Day That The Music Died." Buddy Holly, Richie Valens and The Big Bopper, along with their pilot, Roger Peterson, died when their chartered airplane crashed only minutes after taking off at Mason City Airport, Clear Lake Iowa.

Three of most promising entertainers were gone forever, but their music lives on.  

"American Pie" was a song written by Don Mclean in tribute for these singers. It is still being played today.

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Related Links
o Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
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o The Korean War,
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o "American Pie"
o Also by oldwinebottle


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A Peek At The '50s | 96 comments (55 topical, 41 editorial, 1 hidden)
Dear god, no.... (1.40 / 10) (#1)
by Egil Skallagrimson on Tue May 22, 2007 at 02:23:16 PM EST


----------------

Enterobacteria phage T2 is a virulent bacteriophage of the T4-like viruses genus, in the family Myoviridae. It infects E. coli and is the best known of the T-even phages. Its virion contains linear double-stranded DNA, terminally redundant and circularly permuted.

YOU ARE A RANK HYPOCRITE, AND A SCOUNDREL (2.50 / 6) (#2)
by insomnyuk on Tue May 22, 2007 at 02:30:42 PM EST



---
"There is only one honest impulse at the bottom of Puritanism, and that is the impulse to punish the man with a superior capacity for happiness." - H.L. Mencken
[ Parent ]
this is waaaay wrose than anything (1.66 / 6) (#3)
by Egil Skallagrimson on Tue May 22, 2007 at 02:31:35 PM EST

I could dredge up and copypasta.

----------------

Enterobacteria phage T2 is a virulent bacteriophage of the T4-like viruses genus, in the family Myoviridae. It infects E. coli and is the best known of the T-even phages. Its virion contains linear double-stranded DNA, terminally redundant and circularly permuted.
[ Parent ]

NO, IT IS ORIGINAL CONTENT, YOU HACK (3.00 / 4) (#4)
by insomnyuk on Tue May 22, 2007 at 02:34:31 PM EST



---
"There is only one honest impulse at the bottom of Puritanism, and that is the impulse to punish the man with a superior capacity for happiness." - H.L. Mencken
[ Parent ]
You wrote the lyrics to American Pie? $ (3.00 / 3) (#7)
by NoControl on Tue May 22, 2007 at 04:07:54 PM EST



[ Parent ]
Where is the Canadian pie? (3.00 / 3) (#8)
by United Fools on Tue May 22, 2007 at 04:38:17 PM EST


We are united, we are fools, and we are America!
Sorry, I ate it. (3.00 / 3) (#11)
by oldwinebottle on Tue May 22, 2007 at 04:42:01 PM EST



[ Parent ]
two fun korean war tidbits (2.50 / 4) (#20)
by circletimessquare on Tue May 22, 2007 at 07:57:40 PM EST

the soviet union was absent during the vote to intervene in south korea. and so the usa's resolution passed. nobody dissed the un after that. before the korean war, the un was a hippie joke. when the un proved it had teeth, the un was taken seriously. please note: the un will die (has died) when it loses those teeth. it is either backed up by force of arms, or it isn't important. it is aggressive in its stance, or it is pointless

also, macarthur wanted to nuke china. macarthur was an asshole


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

UN was still worthless, even then (none / 1) (#22)
by anaesthetica on Tue May 22, 2007 at 08:54:08 PM EST

The UN didn't prove that it had teeth because the Soviet Union wasn't part of the decision to have a UN mission against North Korea. Indeed, the Soviet Union gave Kim Il-sung the go ahead. This was just the East-West division, only the West could conveniently use the UN mechanism because the USSR was doing its "empty seat" stunt.

—I'm the little engine that didn't.
k5: our trolls go to eleven
[A]S FAR AS A PERSON'S ACTIONS ARE CONCERNED, IT IS NOT TRUE THAT NOTHING BUT GOOD COMES FROM GOOD AND NOTHING BUT EVIL COMES FROM EVIL, BUT RATHER QUITE FREQUENTLY THE OPPOSITE IS THE CASE. ANYONE WHO DOES NOT REALIZE THIS IS IN FACT A MERE CHILD IN POLITICAL MATTERS. max weber, politics as a vocation


[ Parent ]
by your rationale the un has no use (2.50 / 4) (#23)
by circletimessquare on Tue May 22, 2007 at 08:59:14 PM EST

except as a debating society that never agrees to do anything

either the un is force in the world, or the un is the triangulation of everyone's opinion to the point of lukewarm nothingness

hey i have an idea

how about the un grab some guns and fucking enforce this


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

This may be a tangent... (2.00 / 2) (#37)
by dissonant on Wed May 23, 2007 at 06:47:37 PM EST

...but why is it that so many UN supporters like the idea of a one world government?  I mean, have you really thought that through?  A government that you can't run from?  I could see a one world government being a good thing when and if we colonize some other worlds, but until then, maybe not so much.

[ Parent ]
about the one wolrd government (3.00 / 4) (#38)
by circletimessquare on Wed May 23, 2007 at 06:55:21 PM EST

it's inevitable


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]
Sure (3.00 / 2) (#62)
by Just this guy on Thu May 24, 2007 at 07:17:20 PM EST

Just like terrorism or pedophilia. Doesn't mean you shouldn't try to prevent it, even if you can never win.

[ Parent ]
i'm kinda wondering if it is really worse (none / 0) (#81)
by circletimessquare on Fri May 25, 2007 at 01:32:36 PM EST

can you make the case to me about what would be definitely worse about it?


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]
A few reasons, all related (none / 0) (#90)
by Just this guy on Sat May 26, 2007 at 02:03:40 PM EST

Sometimes groups seem to develop collective insanity, despite procedural safeguards. In that case, having the option to leave without having to engage in violent revolution is a very good thing. Call that the safety-valve effect.

Related to the first reason is that the most repressive governments in the world tend to have had rules against letting people leave, generally because they know people would have started to leave in droves if they didn't change things. Until such time as there are other places than earth to leave, having one world government establishes de-facto non-emigration policy.

Another reason is the same reason it's bad to have only one grocery store in your small town. They might be a bunch of nice guys, but that doesn't meant they're doing the best job they could. If there's another grocery store in town doing things better, even if people don't switch which store they shop at, it puts pressure on the other one to do a better job just in case people leave.

[ Parent ]

IAWTP (2.66 / 3) (#66)
by Tlazolteol on Thu May 24, 2007 at 07:51:24 PM EST



[ Parent ]
i too can only see in black and white (none / 0) (#95)
by fleece on Sat Jun 02, 2007 at 05:53:44 AM EST

sometimes i trip over dalmatians



I feel like some drunken crazed lunatic trying to outguess a cat ~ Louis Winthorpe III
[ Parent ]
really? (none / 1) (#72)
by shokk on Fri May 25, 2007 at 07:26:53 AM EST

Is the UN still residing at that building in Manhattan?  Must be some tenants right dispute that is keeping them from being evicted.  Something about 9/10 the law.   I hear none of the tenants actually have a job.  They sit in that house all day talking and all night partying and never do a thing.
"Beware of he who would deny you access to information, for in his heart, he dreams himself your master."
[ Parent ]
MacArthur (none / 0) (#84)
by anonimouse on Fri May 25, 2007 at 02:09:34 PM EST

Was a flawed genius. Whatever his shortcomings, without MacArthur, you probably would not have S.Korea or a stable democratic Japan. The landings at Inchon and his general military campaign up to the chinese invasion was exemplary. I also understand he wanted to bomb the bridges from China to N. Korea but was vetoed. Had he done so, the whole of Korea would be a democracy today.

When you said "nobody dissed the UN after that" you were wrong. Everyone dissed the UN after that, but made sure that they had a vetoing Security Council member to back them up so they could diss with impunity.
~
Sleepyhel:
Relationships and friendships are complex beasts. There's nothing wrong with doing things a little differently.
[ Parent ]

LOL THANKS A WHOLE FUCKING LOT LUXEMBOURG (3.00 / 6) (#24)
by Tex Bigballs on Tue May 22, 2007 at 11:38:06 PM EST



Don't mock - that's their entire army$ (3.00 / 3) (#27)
by yozzlen on Wed May 23, 2007 at 04:12:28 AM EST



[ Parent ]
They suffered terrible casualties (none / 0) (#91)
by mrogers on Mon May 28, 2007 at 07:43:36 AM EST

Half of them were killed when the donkey fell off a cliff.

[ Parent ]
The Nuclear Arms Race (3.00 / 3) (#31)
by localroger on Wed May 23, 2007 at 08:03:38 AM EST

Although it didn't reach the crisis everyone expected until 1962, the Russians surprised everyone by breaking the American nuclear monopoly by copying Fat Man in 1949, so the 50's saw America freaking out trying to out-bigger-bomb the Russians (who always managed to duplicate our efforts within a couple of years) and building bigger badder delivery systems. A lot of this had nothing specifically to do with Korea but with a cadre of hard noses orbiting around Curtis LeMay who believed that the sooner we got around to annihilating the Russians, the fewer people we'd lose in the inevitable process. Schools had "duck and cover" drills and nuclear paranoia was never far from anyone's mind.

I am become Death, Destroyer of Worlds -- J. Robert Oppenheimer
The paranoia was quite rampant (2.00 / 1) (#33)
by oldwinebottle on Wed May 23, 2007 at 10:41:31 AM EST

in Canada also. It seemed the Russians were quite feared in that era. The "drills" were also held throughout schools here.

[ Parent ]
and the celebration of the split atom, iir (3.00 / 1) (#44)
by livus on Wed May 23, 2007 at 09:13:04 PM EST

I hava a hazy memory that they were quite celebratory about nuclear power (and the new power plants) and had these cutesy symbols and characters and even a car.

Also, science fiction film takes a definate turn in the 50s from being about old school monsters to being about technology and atomic power.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

Yes (3.00 / 2) (#46)
by localroger on Wed May 23, 2007 at 09:31:47 PM EST

The "friendly atom" campaign was an ultimately failed attempt to rehabilitate the Manhattan Project and Cold War nuclear arms race. The SciFi films of the era were a populist reaction to this. Really, before the 1950's there weren't any SF films. When they appeared, they tended to be about the unanticipated dangers of technology -- nuclear radiation creating giant ants (THEM), new chemicals making you shrink (The Incredible Shrinking Man), new alien life forms (no doubt Communist) that are invulnerable to our war machine (The Blob, the 50's era War of the Worlds, The Thing). These echoed peoples' suspicions about these new modalities that were being put into place, suspicions that were often correct about the short-sightedness of our leaders if not in the exact mechanism of eventual risk.

I am become Death, Destroyer of Worlds -- J. Robert Oppenheimer
[ Parent ]
oops, my bad (3.00 / 1) (#47)
by livus on Wed May 23, 2007 at 09:45:01 PM EST

what I meant was popular horror took a turn in the 50s away from Wolfman and co and towards The Blob/ SF - I tend to see 50s sf as a continuum of 40s horror as a lot of it was made by the same people and draws on the earlier established conventions. Yeah I think you're right about the reasons for their uptake.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
point taken (3.00 / 4) (#48)
by localroger on Wed May 23, 2007 at 09:49:32 PM EST

You could even say the SF film genre evolved from horror through its roots in Cold War paranoia. There were a few earlier "SF" films -- very few -- but it was the dabbling in the horror of technology that led to films like Forbidden Planet, and ultimately to the celebration of technology in 2001:ASO.

I am become Death, Destroyer of Worlds -- J. Robert Oppenheimer
[ Parent ]
oh I dunno (none / 1) (#57)
by livus on Thu May 24, 2007 at 05:20:35 AM EST

we weave a tangled web. I mean, sf per se came earlier, and technology was being hard out celebrated by people like the Italian futurists in the early part of the C20th. It was kind of like the "perfect storm" happened in the 50s.

Cold war paranoia certainly hit Hollywood hard though.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

This happened in the gendre in 1818. nt. (3.00 / 2) (#51)
by spooked on Thu May 24, 2007 at 12:28:24 AM EST



Seriously.
[ Parent ]
I troll myself with typos. (none / 1) (#53)
by spooked on Thu May 24, 2007 at 12:43:29 AM EST

IFI.

Seriously.
[ Parent ]
plse explain. n (none / 1) (#56)
by livus on Thu May 24, 2007 at 05:15:09 AM EST



---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
Shelley. nt. (none / 1) (#69)
by spooked on Fri May 25, 2007 at 03:33:10 AM EST



Seriously.
[ Parent ]
Although old school monsters (3.00 / 2) (#61)
by TDS on Thu May 24, 2007 at 03:46:45 PM EST

were not themselves about nothing. Some of the usual crew were pretty much ready for retirement by then because concerns had changed, although there is always the scope for them to come back out of retirement (Dracula, for example, was pretty much put out of a job by 1960s permissiveness but found an unexpected recall when AIDS kicked in). I'm going to disagree with you slightly re: Wolfman, he's a teengager hitting puberty and so a very acute 1950s concern. I think he, perhaps alone, was not displaced.

My objection to the horror genre is pretty much that it is always so blunt and obvious. When I was a kid I was very into it but when I realised what was going on I felt a bit manipulated by it all really. Sci-fi sometimes takes that character when it is acting in the horror mode, which is to say it is concerned with anxieties. The other branch is the novel of ideas, what makes it interesting is I suppose you always see a serious conflict between the fearful 'luddite' and the futurist expressed in the battle between the two. So there is the blob but there is also the guy with the nuclear-powered rocket ship.

Although you have my permission to start sniggering at this suggestion, the best place to observe it at the moment is in Japanese (sci-fi) anime where they seem to be in the grip of really powerful anxieties which are expressed in a rather guileless, innocent way without any self-consciousness at all. I sort of wonder if Freudian psychoanalysis never made it there as a popular concept because if it had you'd imagine a lot more inhibition. Some of it is real cry for help stuff once you look through the cheesy/slightly offensive genre conventions.

And when we die, we will die with our hands unbound. This is why we fight.
[ Parent ]

no, I agree (none / 1) (#67)
by livus on Thu May 24, 2007 at 08:20:36 PM EST

they certainly weren't about nothing. There's a lot that's been said about representation of class in Hammer dracula for example.

I can't seem to find any early-mid 50s wolfmen though, except one radioactive one. There were just so many other bodily transformation narratives I suppose in the 50s. Then at the end of the 50s you get the I Was A Teenage werewolf, frankenstein, etc, and then in the 80s the Teen Wolf series etc.

Your Japanese anime point is interesting - I can't help thinking though that Freud has in some ways caused a Freudian structure of thought (eg the 60s psychological turn in horror/thriller) in western societies.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

FREUD, FRAUD, COINCIDENCE? I THINK NOT! {[nt (none / 1) (#68)
by Another Hope on Fri May 25, 2007 at 12:57:47 AM EST



[ Parent ]
Eveybody's Got One (3.00 / 2) (#92)
by mrogers on Mon May 28, 2007 at 09:01:27 AM EST

Interesting idea about Freud creating the Freudian mind. My own view is that Freud destroyed the Freudian mind: by giving us access to the contents of the subconscious he brought those contents into play as part of conscious culture, and thus his previously true description of the mind became false. You couldn't write Dracula in the 21st century without acknowledging the sexual symbolism, which would rob the symbolism of its unconscious power and turn it into an intellectual reference-game. In fact reference-games seem to be the post-Freudian replacement for symbolism.

So if what was once subconscious has become conscious, what are the new contents of the subconscious? Or has the subconscious dried out and blown away in a cloud of desperately ironic and knowing references? Is it impossible to have subconscious motivations in a post-Freudian world, or do those motivations just take on new forms? Or is the whole idea that the subconscious has dried up just a rationalisation designed to keep the essentially unchanged subconscious safe beneath the surface?

[ Parent ]

Drac (none / 1) (#85)
by anonimouse on Fri May 25, 2007 at 02:15:31 PM EST

...has never gone out of fashion. As far as I am aware he was perfectly at home in the permissive 60's and 70's. Just look at English Hammer Horror films for proof.
~
Sleepyhel:
Relationships and friendships are complex beasts. There's nothing wrong with doing things a little differently.
[ Parent ]
Yes. And no. And yes. (none / 1) (#86)
by TDS on Fri May 25, 2007 at 06:05:49 PM EST

I sort of thought in the Hammer films, he's just a sort of bogeyman really, the edge isn't there (I mean, they are hokey films anyway).

Bram Stoker's book is about sex, and female sexuality at that. Swarthy foreigners? Mina is in "ecastacy" when he gives her a bite. Its all that Freud in Vienna repressed stuff. I'm having a fit of the vapours, would you mind loosening my corset, oh for some reason that is making it worse, whatever can be going on. I'm not necessarily saying thats what he had in mind, but it was that element that has made it endure.

He will always be a bit popular as a standard issue bad guy and also particularly to adolescent girls (this does make me LOL when I see their webpages and mailing lists, do you think they realise whats going on?). But for maxiumum, er, bite you need the right social circumstances, and AIDS was definitely the stimulus for the new wave of vampiremania. The blood thing was a weird coincidence.

He operates on a few levels I guess.

And when we die, we will die with our hands unbound. This is why we fight.
[ Parent ]

in hammer he's a bit of a toff (none / 1) (#89)
by livus on Sat May 26, 2007 at 12:53:45 AM EST

--> degenerate

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
no, I think you'll find he came back in, (none / 1) (#88)
by livus on Sat May 26, 2007 at 12:52:10 AM EST

after an absence. Like frankenstein; and, er, you.

Long time no see. How are you?

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]

I'm fine (none / 0) (#93)
by anonimouse on Tue May 29, 2007 at 08:08:40 PM EST

I just spend more time lurking on that other site
~
Sleepyhel:
Relationships and friendships are complex beasts. There's nothing wrong with doing things a little differently.
[ Parent ]
oh, of course (none / 0) (#94)
by livus on Tue May 29, 2007 at 10:00:40 PM EST

I forgot about that site, but come to think of it I can always go and catch up on your exploits there.

---
HIREZ substitute.
be concrete asshole, or shut up. - CTS
I guess I skipped school or something to drink on the internet? - lonelyhobo
I'd like to hope that any impression you got about us from internet forums was incorrect. - debillitatus
I consider myself trolled more or less just by visiting the site. HollyHopDrive

[ Parent ]
DAKINI (1.51 / 58) (#35)
by The Lady In The Radiator on Wed May 23, 2007 at 03:25:03 PM EST

I WILL PAY YOU TO FUCK THIS GUY INTO A CRATER. WE CAN SELL THE VIDEO TAPE RIGHT FUCKING HERE AND MAKE MILLIONS. YOU'RE STRONG. YOU'LL HOLD YOUR OWN.

FUCK, TRUTH HURTS.


you still use video? can't afford anything newer? (2.00 / 4) (#65)
by Tlazolteol on Thu May 24, 2007 at 07:46:57 PM EST



[ Parent ]
What the fuck is this shit? (2.72 / 11) (#36)
by daveybaby on Wed May 23, 2007 at 06:08:09 PM EST

Did you type '1950s' into wikipedia and then just do a random sampling of the results or something?

If you like, i can do a list of the different types of churches built in germany.

i like (3.00 / 5) (#39)
by Zero Gonzales on Wed May 23, 2007 at 07:38:12 PM EST

+1 fp

[ Parent ]
Thanks. (1.66 / 3) (#52)
by oldwinebottle on Thu May 24, 2007 at 12:35:33 AM EST



[ Parent ]
uh, no. not you (3.00 / 4) (#54)
by Zero Gonzales on Thu May 24, 2007 at 12:50:49 AM EST

"If you like, i can do a list of the different types of churches built in germany."

I am suggesting he should do such a thing and then submit it to the queue as a mockery of this article so that i may vote it +1FP

[ Parent ]

I would do (3.00 / 9) (#59)
by daveybaby on Thu May 24, 2007 at 09:53:43 AM EST

but wikipedia doesnt have a page on churches in germany that i could be bothered to find.

Seriously though, i really dont get that people are +1FPing this article. Its just a list of stuff, with perfunctory descriptions. No insight, no conclusions, no original thought. It's not even written in a style that betrays any excitement or love of the subject matter. Dry as a fucking bone.

Are people voting for it because it's the right length, or something? Or is it just that the spelling and grammar are ok? What the fuck is wrong with you people?

[ Parent ]

maybe you should find some churchs in your (1.20 / 5) (#64)
by Tlazolteol on Thu May 24, 2007 at 07:45:01 PM EST

little town and get on your knees. oh wait, you don't need to go to church to do that.

[ Parent ]
lol @ dakini sulking (1.50 / 2) (#70)
by Sir Digby Cream of Sum Yung Gai on Fri May 25, 2007 at 04:20:30 AM EST

pathetic. childish. predictable. cheap. unimaginative.

[ Parent ]
Can't believe crap stories like this get posted. (3.00 / 2) (#87)
by OzJuggler on Fri May 25, 2007 at 09:51:53 PM EST

I could recycle the "Hastening the death of k5" theme, but there's always hope. At least it didn't make FP like the rascist bloodlust vitriol of last week.

Posted with a score of 23 ? Twentyfuckenthree? The lowest story I ever got posted scored 27 but that was a meta article about improving the kuro5hin user interface - not claiming to summarise an entire decade of world events.

Sentimentality only rates with people who were there too. Lame arse 1950s sentimentality is boring as bat shit to anyone born after 1970. When this author wrote about 1900 through 1930 we could be fairly sure they were not from personal experience, and the time was remote enough to be interesting. But we did not want yet another tale about an era that forms the foundation of western pop culture. We are sick of 50s sentimentality. As though being fat and happy was ever a good idea.

Perhaps we need a cabal of elite kuro5hineans to monitor and mob-vote stupid queue entries like this one. Call it collaborative editing - steel capped boot style. Or you could just bump the post threshold up to 40 like it was (oh noes!) IN THE GOOD OLD DAYS. Yes, that statement will not impress anyone with a uid above 20,000.

The only thing mildy valuable about this story was that it was Canadian-centric instead of USA-centric.

I imagine this oldwinebottle dickhead wears coke bottle glasses and sandals with long socks and I just want to punch him in the head and yell STUPID FUCKING BABY BOOMER EAT YOUR CARCINOGENIC SHIT AND DIE YOU UNCARING EMOTIONALLY STUNTED MOTHERFUCKER.

Ah, that feels better. No abandonment issues at all, honest. ;-)

OzJuggler.
"And I will not rest until every year families gather to spend December 25th together
at Osama's homo abortion pot and commie jizzporium." - Jon Stewart's gift to Bill O'Reilly, 7 Dec 2005.

i've become a fan of this series (none / 0) (#96)
by fleece on Sat Jun 02, 2007 at 06:14:43 AM EST

I lolled in several places. Your consistentcy of tone is remarkable, and you have an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of cheesy cliches.

I don't think people are appreciating how difficult it must be for you to churn this crap out without breaking character.



I feel like some drunken crazed lunatic trying to outguess a cat ~ Louis Winthorpe III

A Peek At The '50s | 96 comments (55 topical, 41 editorial, 1 hidden)
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