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[P]
Observations on Dove Hunting

By GhostOfTiber in Culture
Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 11:17:59 PM EST
Tags: Doves, Hunting, Shooting, Shotguns, Sports, Dove McNuggets (all tags)

One of my buddies had a brilliant idea I hadn't thought of: Check Pennsylvania's maps for what's called a co-op farm. It's not a commune, it's a farm which offers up it's land to the public for hunting.

What the Farmer Gets
If the hunters are decent-folk, they generally clean up the trash off the property. I personally built a blind out of rocks I happened to find in a fallow field to give me something to sit on and a hiding place. The blind is next to a power utility pole, so it gives me a great shot at birds coming in slowly to land on the wires. He got his field cleaned essentially for free since I also picked up trash. I don't want my game animals eating garbage.

The other bonus the farmer enjoys is limited crop losses to wildlife. This particular farmer was doing the soy-corn-fallow crop rotation which is pretty typical Pennsylvania crop rotation. Doves love this stuff and eat it up. Probably about 2/3rds of the doves I cleaned had corn in their crop.

What the Hunters Get
A place to hunt with a ton of acreage devoted to what essentially amounts to bait.


Doves
The doves were mostly mournings and a few white-tips and grays thrown in. Doves generally are mutts, I think all the distinct groups can interbreed and they do quite often. This results in quite an array of plumage and makes the birds actually quite beautiful. Doves only require a month from the laying of an egg to having their young flying, so they multiply like mad. The birds will typically lay two eggs in the wild, but I've come across nests with 3 or 4 in environments where nothing hunts the doves. In Philadelphia, for instance, I've seen pigeons and doves which would cup nicely in two hands. Typically the doves lay two eggs and will fit comfortably into a single hand out here.

The Show
We were firmly in view of new construction, and I have to say it feels a little bit weird to have BMW SUVs driving past the lot where the cars were parked while I sort out my chokes. We were in suburbia. I got a bit of a kick out of having children watch the show from their windows, I don't know if they were looking on in horror or enjoying seeing a bunch of adults being outsmarted by a bird. But man, the show from the windows would have been great. When you hit a bird, it looks like God used a flyswatter to stop them mid-flight. There's a small poof of feathers, and the bird drops. Sometimes they helicopter down, but for the most part they stop flapping and smash into the ground like World War 2 aircraft. You can almost hear the WRRRRRRRR of the engine as the dead bird comes to terms with the planet.

On the other hand, birds don't generally enjoy being shot at, and after a few minutes all the birds in the area know your game. Anyone who says birds aren't smart needs to go wing-shooting. I've had birds I've been pulling across put on the brakes mid-flight right before I fired. I have a bird see me, change course behind trees, and fly through branches for cover. I even witnessed a bird do a barrel roll around the wadding from the shotgun. Think about that next time you see a pigeon stealing your french-fries: These guys have moves that will make a fighter pilot jealous.

Guns
I brought along my Baikal, which is sold as a Remington SPR 310 locally. They're quite a value and usually end up on the "off brand" gun racks despite being just a straight rebrand. If you're looking for a decent, entry level over-under shotgun, they're the ticket. Why over-under? It's like having two shotguns. There was the ever popular Remington 870 in a few different configurations, but I'm in the school of thought that having two different chokes is preferred to having double the ammo. Basically, the choke defines how much spread the pellets have at what distance. Tighter chokes mean the pellets spread out less, looser chokes give more spread. Since doves can be flying any direction, I had my first barrel shooting improved (loose) and the second barrel firing modified (tighter). This particular over-under is typical of many others and has a fire selector. The 870 guys happened to be using modified. It's fine if you're a good shot, but being new to wing-shooting, I preferred having doubles. I think next time I go out, I will probably go for modified followed by full - the doves were smart enough to keep their distance, which is the enemy of a shotgun. If the lead goes 75 yards, it's quite a long shot. Usually by 50, it's done.

Someone always has to show off, our resident hunting specialist who had been doing it since God created doves brought out a krieghoff. The gun is simply beautiful to behold, well balanced, has wonderful wood and fantastic etching. It also comes with a price tag that makes the national debt of any nation look cheap. However, this guy knew what he was doing. He shot modified/full, and when that gun fired, the bird dropped. I don't think he used his second barrel all day. I asked what he was shooting and he said "WalMart #8 Winchesters". Which just goes to show that buying a nice gun and feeding it crap ammo still drops birds with shotguns.

The Shot
Opinion varied on shot from hand-loading shotshell hulls to special steel magic shot to wal-mart crap. The guy with the most expensive gun was shooting the crap in #8. My buddy with the most birds was hand-loading shells with #7, and had a middle of the road gun. I was using walmart crap on an entry level gun and still hit 9 birds. I will probably do better once I learn to trust the gun and stop leading the birds as much. So long as the bird is touching the ramp in the right direction, the shot will hit. The bead is only for comings and goings. But, out of a set of "winchester crap", I had 9 birds, the other two guys had 7 with the Remington 870s, and the guy with the Krieg had 10. Ammo doesn't seem to play a role as much as the quality of the choke set and gun. Of course, knowing how to aim really helps too. Clays only prepare you so much.

Downing and Retrieval
Most birds mercifully die in mid-flight when they're hit with the Flyswatter of the Gods. These birds are easy to find and it's usually a matter of just watching where they go down, finding a landmark to walk towards behind them, and being cognizant of your location as it relates to everything. Look for feathers pointing to the area the bird went down, usually the shot knocked quite a few pin feathers loose. Fresh feathers are well preened and downy, old feathers look haggard and flat. Usually finding feathers along the final flight path of the bird will point you to the birds location. Birds have a weird tendency to "hang up", so they're not always on the ground. A few times I found a bird resting on top of the grassy tops of the corn. Thankfully hunting over corn means well regulated rows, which are easy to look down.

Part two of that is sometimes the birds don't die in mid-flight. The more maneuverable birds or the worse shots in the group only hit the birds with a single pellet. Unfortunately this results in broken wings at worst. At best, that single pellet penetrates the bird and brings it down. When the birds come down live, it's best to make things quick. Picking up the bird (which is almost always in shock enough that it won't try to resist) and quickly snapping it's neck is the only way to go. Death comes quickly. Like a chicken, a broken neck doesn't always kill the bird immediately. For this situation, I found it's best to cover the birds head until it calms down, then quickly and firmly twist the neck to cut off circulation and breathing. The bird will pass into the good night with only a moment of this and will continue to look like it's sleeping, minus no signs of breathing.

At no time at all is it acceptable to leave a bird downed in the field. Every hunter hopes the bird falls to the earth dead, but sometimes this isn't the case. Just because of this, a good effort needs to be made to always recover the birds. I was fairly angry with the next group over which had rationalized the shooting with "We recover the birds at the end of the day" (last light) which is hard, and then again with "the corn is too hard to push through". I personally fished through a sweetbrier patch for a bird because I knew it went down wounded and wasn't going to let one suffer, it really pisses me off to no end when I'm filled with thorns and these two guys are too lazy to push through corn.

Stories From the Shot
Sometimes things just don't go right. Its considered poor form to shoot birds which aren't in flight. The rule stems directly from the fact that people don't appreciate you shooting all the leaves out of their trees. In these modern times, this rule also became even more important since birds like to land on power lines and other utilities. Unfortunately, the #8 shot I was using left a little less than a quarter of the birds wounded, compared to the #7 which would always down the birds DOA (at the risk of blowing largish holes in them for their size). One of the birds I shot, I saw the tell-tale poof of feathers and the bird stop flapping, which means the bird is probably dead. To my amazement, the bird came back to life after a tumble and landed on a power line. This is the first time, all day, I have seen a bird do this. My guess was that he's either been shot at before and smart enough to play dead, or I wounded him. Unfortunately for him, this was the power line that went right over my little pile of rocks I was using as a stool. I waited, and waited, and waited... I opened the shotgun and reloaded it. I yelled at the bird. I flashed light at it off the barrel. Nothing. This bird was going to sit on this power line until it either died of radiation or a hawk got it. One of the other guys finally said "If you're using #8, you're probably not going to cut the wire". I still walked a bit of ways for good distance to spread the shot out, selected my improved barrel, and fired.

I stood there in disbelief when nothing happened. No poof of feathers, the line didn't move, and the bird was still up there cleaning himself. I was thinking that this was one of those movies when someone is shooting animals and then you find out at the end that it's really Furry Jesus and they try to guilt trip you into joining their church. Sure enough, the gun had gone off, so I lined up, squeezed the trigger again and this time there was an immense poof of feathers, which a bird flew out of, and the power lines were swinging threateningly. I made my peace with God in a short moment as I watched the 220v wire swing back and forth. It didn't come down, but it was certainly scary. Upon examining the bird (now dead), I saw I had cleanly shot his tail feathers off. It looked clean as if someone had taken some scissors and just cut them off an inch after the bird. It was pretty impressive shooting, but its a good example of why it's so terribly important to make sure game is either OK or DOA.

Later that day, more birds had flown in over the corn. The way the birds were playing it was that they flew under the wires through the via created from the brush being cut back and could approach the corn without fear of being bounced by a hawk. The hawks wouldn't try to fly between the power lines, so the birds could enter and exit the field safely. Well, safe as possible, I later took an accidental shot at a hawk which had figured out the game and while I had a clean miss on the hawk, the hawk managed to get the dove as it tried to evade the talons. The birds followed this pattern, and would fly low over the corn, which also protected them from the shot. Another in our party managed to wing a bird, which made an abrupt evasive turn towards the creek.

Going back to the idea that all animals must be retrieved, I offered to help find the evaded dove since I too had shot at it. I was using #8 and knew my shot, he was using handloads of sawdust packed #7. His birds were easy to identify from the color of the wounds against the feathers and the size of the holes. We wandered down to the creek, and through those gnarled briers with their fragrant rose-hips. One of the sorriest sights is a bird down in the thorns, so I wanted to find this one. We split up, he wanted to walk along the water and over the rocks - away from the brush - and I was going to follow a hunch. Sure enough, I happened upon the bird on the ground, dead, but it had made it completely under the knot and took me a bit to work the branches apart. Once I had gotten the bird out, I heard yelling from up the creek followed by a blast. It sounded remarkably like a late Nirvana song, which wasn't good. Walking up the bank, I happen across the other hunter, scrambling up the bank himself. He pointed to a marred part of his boot. Apparently, in the search for the bird, he walked up the creek and stepped on a water snake. The snake, not being happy about this, turned around and bit him right on the steel-toed boot. The shotgun blast was him trying to shoot the snake. I'm not sure who ruined the boot more: The snakebite or him trying to shoot his toes off. I'm sure up in heaven flying around with his new wings, there is a dove laughing at the silly people down there with the boomsticks who can see doves against the sky, but occasionally forget to look down on the rest of nature.

I think the snake was put up to it, personally.

Doves in the Pan, Doves in the Oven
Doves can be used in substitute for chicken in many recipes, and they enjoy the distinction of being both dark and light meat. The lighter meat is central to the breast, the darker meat is over that as the flight muscles. Cleaning them is simple: Pull off the head, slip a finger in the crop (neck), feel under the breastbone and push your thumb in and pull apart. The breast will come out cleanly on the wishbone and the skin should pull off. The dove looks a lot like a chicken breast. Because doves are fairly fit, there's little point in eating the wings or legs, those can be discarded and what little meat is on them should have come out with the breast.

I suggest boiling the birds twice: The first boil is in heavily salted water and will get the blood out. Throw the salt into the water (give a shaker a shake for each dove in the pot) with enough to cover the birds and bring to a boil. Discard the water when it finally comes to a boil, it should be fairly cloudy. Cover the doves again in lightly seasoned water (traditional bird seasoning is salt, pepper, and some rosemary sprigs). Boil again until the doves are soft to the fork. Finally fry the doves lightly in butter enough to brown the side. Maybe a squeeze of lemon across them all. Be careful of shot still in the birds, but each side of the breast should freely come off the bone for a morsel. Wild bird is a delight to have, and is a feast for the senses in taste, smell, and the beauty of the feathers.

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Poll
Most delicious game bird?
o Turkey 0%
o Chicken 8%
o Dove 0%
o Quail 0%
o Duck 16%
o Pheasant 0%
o Sparrow 0%
o Swallow 0%
o Bald Eagle 25%
o Penguin 16%
o Hawk 0%
o Albatross 0%
o Osprey 0%
o Level 3's Fiber Optic 33%
o WIPO 0%

Votes: 12
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Observations on Dove Hunting | 69 comments (48 topical, 21 editorial, 1 hidden)
A feather too far (3.00 / 5) (#5)
by Sgt York on Mon Sep 17, 2007 at 02:15:10 PM EST

Excellent. The farm technique is common in Texas (cue Cheney jokes). We used to hunt in sorghum fields, they LOVE that shit. You get in early and get them as they come in from the surrounding trees for breakfast, then come again in the afternoon. It's illegal to bait the birds by scattering seed, but hunting over fields is just fine.

As for landed birds, IIRC it's actually illegal in TX, TN, AR, and MS (the states in which I have hunted fowl). Haven't been hunting in NC yet. I've kind of moved away from it in favor of fishing anyway.

Dove hunting story:

This is from an old college buddy of nine. He was a kid, on his first hunting trip with his dad, going for dove. They were hunting a clearing with a group of people. They were strewn through the surrounding cover, all in different areas. Kid and Dad were a few hundred yards apart. Kid has spent the whole morning out there, and hadn't gotten a thing. A group of three flew high over the clearing, moving from one stand of trees to another. Kid takes aim, fires, and one bird tumbles to earth from a puff of feathers. Elated, he runs out to the fallen bird...and it's moving.

"Dad! It's still moving!"

"Well don't just stand there, kill it!"

Kid looks at bird. Thinks about asking dad and looks towards him...but some more birds are approaching...he looks at the bird on the ground. He looks at his gun....BANG! Point blank. 12-gauge.

When the feathers clear, he looks at a hole in the ground. He looks around, his dad isn't looking. He must think it was one of the other hunters shooting. Kid looks around for the biggest piece of doveburger and shoves in it his game bag.

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.

HAHAHA, I lolled. (none / 1) (#11)
by GhostOfTiber on Mon Sep 17, 2007 at 03:46:02 PM EST

I took Hunter Safety almost 20 years ago, but I don't remember them ever teaching us what to do if we came across a live but wounded animal.

My buddy says the message nowadays is "hide the guns, don't throw deer across the hood, don't shoot anyone, and don't drink and hunt."

To me, that's a disservice to hunters, because if someone were interested in the sport but didn't know how to go about it, there's no "hunter ethics" class. I dunno, I suppose it's still a personal thing as to how people go about it, but I do wish someone had a general hunting class with information similar to "break their necks, don't shoot them".

I'm reading Shots at Whitetails at the moment and Koller mentions the same thing. Too many books about what's the best gun and none on fieldcraft and the relationship with animals.

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

'relationship with animals' (none / 0) (#18)
by ray eckson on Mon Sep 17, 2007 at 06:29:58 PM EST

t-1ber's kink revealed


wampsy: hey ray why don't you start up a site. you could call it ray5.
rusty: I gotta fix that stupid cancel bug.
booger: How's that for daring to get ray eckson all sniffy, you cow?
poopy: Not that I'm gay or anything, but for you I might make an exception.
[ Parent ]
I'm not sure... (none / 0) (#32)
by BJH on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 09:12:12 AM EST

...if going out and blasting animals into gibs with artillery really counts as a "relationship".
--
Roses are red, violets are blue.
I'm schizophrenic, and so am I.
-- Oscar Levant

[ Parent ]
it's a delicious relationship (none / 0) (#36)
by GhostOfTiber on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 09:50:43 AM EST

What, you expected duck-tape?  They would have called it "dove tape" if they were big enough for that.

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

It's *duct* tape (1.00 / 2) (#64)
by Zapata on Wed Sep 19, 2007 at 06:01:21 PM EST

It's not sporting to tape the duck up before you shoot it.

"If you ain't got a camel, you ain't Shiite."


[ Parent ]
Lot's of great leases in south Texas. (3.00 / 3) (#20)
by sudogeek on Mon Sep 17, 2007 at 08:10:09 PM EST

My buddy Bob & i shared a lease down near San Benito (famous as the home of Fredy Fender, by the way). There's a great little restuarant there for your chorizo and eggs in the AM. The lease was ranch land full of black oat, mesquite, cactus, rattlesnakes, and javelinas. Bob would go down there several weekends before Mexican dove season opened and spread corn. The goal was to attract dove on the flyway, but usually the javelinas find the bait.  Some hunters use automatic feeders. When that feeder goes off, you can hear the grunting and thrashing in the brush as the little tuskers all come in for meal call. Some days I didn't know whether to bring my shotgun or my .243

You have to get out early, before it gets so damn hot. In the AM, the snakes are still sluggish. As the morning wears on, they move out into the tracks to sun. You need to be damn careful when you reach into the bush for that bird you shot. I would recommend always parting the brush with a stick and moving the bird with the stick before you reach for it. Anyone who thinks that rattlesnakes always warn you will soon get bitten.

For all of those who sneer at hunting and us killers, I have only one request. Just try to go out and hit a bird on the wing. Or, if you can't do that, try sporting clays - easier, but you'll get the idea.

There's a sucker born every minute, and you're an hour's worth.
[ Parent ]

Mmmm.... (3.00 / 3) (#25)
by Sgt York on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 02:23:10 AM EST

Chorizo, eggs, onion, bell pepper and cheese on a tortilla, all wrapped up in a little foil tube. Either that or some kolaches. Sausage, jalapeno and cheese.

DAMN, I miss Texas.

But not javelinas. Nasty little things. Hate the bastards. Ugly, smelly, ornery, and they don't taste very good, IMHO. You must be down south of Corpus, they get pretty common down there, IIRC.

Never been much on those autofeeder things. They basically train the game to come right up to it at a specific time. For me, one of the most enjoyable things about hunting was figuring out where the game was gong to be and when. It's fun and can be very rewarding, even if you don't get a big buck. Just figuring it out and getting it right is fun.

And we hunters are killers. We go out in the woods with the intent to kill something. It's just that, as it's not pointless violence, there's not really anything wrong with it.

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.
[ Parent ]

Dove hunting story (3.00 / 2) (#13)
by wiredog on Mon Sep 17, 2007 at 03:47:01 PM EST

About, oh,25 years ago I went dove hunting for the first (and last) time. A couple friends took me out to a cornfield. So we're walking around the cornfield when we see a covey rise. We put guns to shoulders, aim, lead, BOOM!

Three squirrels fell out of the tree the doves had been flying in front of. So we had squirrel stew for dinner.

The idea of a global village is wrong, it's more like a gazillion pub bars.
Phage

Did you put wings on them? (none / 0) (#14)
by GhostOfTiber on Mon Sep 17, 2007 at 03:50:28 PM EST

They were flying squirrels, right officer? They had wings. Easy mistake!

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

One other thing about dove hunting. (none / 0) (#19)
by sudogeek on Mon Sep 17, 2007 at 07:48:25 PM EST

Don't drink when hunting or when eating small game like dove or pheasant. Chew carefully. Watch out for embedded shot; it will break your teeth.

There's a sucker born every minute, and you're an hour's worth.
You know, I expected that (none / 0) (#29)
by GhostOfTiber on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 08:25:57 AM EST

But I found that the small shot really does work like a flyswatter. It seems like the shock kills them. You do find abrasions on them, but I haven't found any shot in mine.

Now, the guy using #7  heavi-shot which is steel I did find pellets in his birds. It seems the lead is either bouncing off and producing a lot of flesh wounds which still kill the bird, or the lead being a much smaller set of BBs at a much denser pattern is killing by shock. The heavi-shot will kill the birds immediately (I don't think he picked up a live one all day) but you do find those in the bird.

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

Either that... (3.00 / 3) (#31)
by BJH on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 09:08:18 AM EST

...or you're accidentally swallowing the shot whole without noticing it, and will soon die of advanced lead poisoning.
--
Roses are red, violets are blue.
I'm schizophrenic, and so am I.
-- Oscar Levant

[ Parent ]
One can only hope (none / 0) (#61)
by Josh Smith II on Wed Sep 19, 2007 at 01:55:25 PM EST



-- Josh Smith recommends you take a hulver hike.
[ Parent ]
such an upholder of animal welfare (none / 1) (#22)
by ccdotnet on Mon Sep 17, 2007 at 10:15:23 PM EST

I personally fished through a sweetbrier patch for a bird because I knew it went down wounded and wasn't going to let one suffer

... but it's OK to shoot em in the first place, there's no contradiction here.

The idea is to kill them immediately (3.00 / 2) (#30)
by GhostOfTiber on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 08:28:25 AM EST

You're not going out in the woods to cause suffering, you're going out in the woods to cause killing.

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

Been shooting clay pigeons recently (3.00 / 3) (#24)
by TDS on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 01:00:35 AM EST

Unfortunately they don't make very good eating.


And when we die, we will die with our hands unbound. This is why we fight.
Bwahahahahahahah (3.00 / 2) (#26)
by WonderJoust on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 02:39:46 AM EST

For this situation, I found it's best to cover the birds head until it calms down, then quickly and firmly twist the neck to cut off circulation and breathing. The bird will pass into the good night with only a moment of this and will continue to look like it's sleeping, minus no signs of breathing.

Who the fuck are you going hunting with, my 11 year old niece? The idea is to kill it quickly, not euthanize it. Pick it up by the neck and give a good, firm swing to pop the head off in one motion. Extra points if you can catch the body before it hits the ground.

Whatever you do, don't come hunting with me. I hate crying.

_________________________________
i like your style: bitter, without being a complete cunt about it.
-birds ate my face

The one guy did that (none / 1) (#27)
by GhostOfTiber on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 08:21:10 AM EST

IT'S JUST LIKE A CHICKEN, IF YOU DON'T CALM IT DOWN BEFORE POPPING THE HEAD OFF, IT'S STILL GOING TO RUN AROUND.

While it's amusing on the first one, it's sort of gross after the fourth or fifth...

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

I don't seem to have wounded as many as you. (none / 0) (#57)
by WonderJoust on Wed Sep 19, 2007 at 02:57:21 AM EST

I've actually never seen one pull a chicken-with-the-head-off, but will take your word for it. Most I've ever seen is one or two flaps and nothing.

Then again, I can't say I wound alot of birds. They're usually checking out already, just break the neck to make sure. Maybe you don't need a technique for calming the birds as much as solid week at the range.

_________________________________
i like your style: bitter, without being a complete cunt about it.
-birds ate my face
[ Parent ]

Flavor (3.00 / 2) (#40)
by Sgt York on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 12:10:19 PM EST

When you hunt deer, you want to get a shoulder shot. Burst the heart so it drops where it stands. That way, it doesn't run off. All that exertion spoils the flavor of the meat.

As GiT said, it will run around if you don't calm it first. Running's not such a big deal (you don't eat that part of a dove, generally. Not much meat in the legs), but it will try to fly. The wings will flutter like crazy. Meat that has recently run to exhaustion doesn't taste very good; lactic acid.

Even if you wipe out the brain stem with a solid snap, the cord will still kick the reflex in and the heart will continue to beat until it runs out of gas. It's possible to do it, but it's really easy to fuck it up. Better to take a moment and calm the bird first.

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.
[ Parent ]

Now this I can get behind. (none / 0) (#58)
by WonderJoust on Wed Sep 19, 2007 at 03:10:10 AM EST

But my concerns starts to melt when I think about marinating them for 12 hours.

If I have to trade a touch of flavor for reading every animal it's last rights, I'm ok with that.

And if you don't kill the deer on the first shot, you probably don't need to be holding the rifle.

Then again, I socialize with people who knife-hunt boar for kicks. Ever seen a 180 lb West Texas kid dive out of a tree at a 150 lb wild boar, knowing you're in next when things go south?

_________________________________
i like your style: bitter, without being a complete cunt about it.
-birds ate my face
[ Parent ]

natural camoflauge and dove stew (3.00 / 3) (#34)
by nostalgiphile on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 09:34:48 AM EST

When I was 13 or so I used to go dove hunting with my uncle, who was a dead shot, in KS. Not much place to put a blind out on the plain, so we'd find a pond or a water hole and wait just down on the edge of it until the little buggers flew over. Then we'd blast 'em of course. I remember I used a 20 gauge over-and-under coach gun that he loaned me...Only shotgun I ever liked.

My uncle would make some sort of heavy dove stew concoction with the breastes as I recall. It probly didn't help that he was invariably drunk when he did this, but in terms of taste, meh, I'd say better than pheasant but nowhere near as good as wild turkey (both the bird and the bourbon, I mean) smoked and then lightly braised on teh bbq...But turkeys are smarter, and more cunning than doves so it makes sense that they would naturally taste better.

"Depending on your perspective you are an optimist or a pessimist[,] and a hopeless one too." --trhurler

bring back the passenger pigeon you fuckers (3.00 / 2) (#38)
by circletimessquare on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 11:40:31 AM EST

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passenger_pigeon

The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

We have the technology. (3.00 / 4) (#39)
by Sgt York on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 12:03:14 PM EST

Do we have the genetic material?

Srsly. This could be done. Just use an egg from a similar species and clone away. The only problem would be the availability of adequate genetic material of sufficient quality.

They would never be in large wild flocks again, the bottleneck event is far too severe, but they could at least be brought back as a token.

Could be money in it, too. I mean, species generally don't get hunted to extinction if they don't have some kind of market value.

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.
[ Parent ]

you have the park/farm. i have the extinct animals (3.00 / 4) (#41)
by circletimessquare on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 12:15:07 PM EST

JURASSIC PIGEON: THE MOVIE


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]
Yeah. That's what you need. (3.00 / 5) (#44)
by Sgt York on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 12:26:46 PM EST

Another project to never finish.

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.
[ Parent ]

Trying to clone a specific genus of pigeon... (none / 1) (#43)
by GhostOfTiber on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 12:26:26 PM EST

...is like trying to resurrect a specific mix of dog.

Birds are so stupid about who they mate with and what eggs they hatch that there's even birds which use other birds nests in hopes the parents will raise it's young.  :P

Philadelphia is a mess of bird shit simply because someone had the bright idea to try to import a mating pair of each bird mentioned in Shakespeare's plays and now we've got so many birds it's almost a separate insurance policy for bird strikes in traffic.

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

utterly retarded move (none / 1) (#42)
by khallow on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 12:15:28 PM EST

Sometimes things just don't go right. Its considered poor form to shoot birds which aren't in flight. The rule stems directly from the fact that people don't appreciate you shooting all the leaves out of their trees. In these modern times, this rule also became even more important since birds like to land on power lines and other utilities. Unfortunately, the #8 shot I was using left a little less than a quarter of the birds wounded, compared to the #7 which would always down the birds DOA (at the risk of blowing largish holes in them for their size). One of the birds I shot, I saw the tell-tale poof of feathers and the bird stop flapping, which means the bird is probably dead. To my amazement, the bird came back to life after a tumble and landed on a power line. This is the first time, all day, I have seen a bird do this. My guess was that he's either been shot at before and smart enough to play dead, or I wounded him. Unfortunately for him, this was the power line that went right over my little pile of rocks I was using as a stool. I waited, and waited, and waited... I opened the shotgun and reloaded it. I yelled at the bird. I flashed light at it off the barrel. Nothing. This bird was going to sit on this power line until it either died of radiation or a hawk got it. One of the other guys finally said "If you're using #8, you're probably not going to cut the wire". I still walked a bit of ways for good distance to spread the shot out, selected my improved barrel, and fired.

I stood there in disbelief when nothing happened. No poof of feathers, the line didn't move, and the bird was still up there cleaning himself. I was thinking that this was one of those movies when someone is shooting animals and then you find out at the end that it's really Furry Jesus and they try to guilt trip you into joining their church. Sure enough, the gun had gone off, so I lined up, squeezed the trigger again and this time there was an immense poof of feathers, which a bird flew out of, and the power lines were swinging threateningly. I made my peace with God in a short moment as I watched the 220v wire swing back and forth. It didn't come down, but it was certainly scary. Upon examining the bird (now dead), I saw I had cleanly shot his tail feathers off. It looked clean as if someone had taken some scissors and just cut them off an inch after the bird. It was pretty impressive shooting, but its a good example of why it's so terribly important to make sure game is either OK or DOA.

I'll vote this +1 FP just to get this bit of wisdom on the front page.

Stating the obvious since 1969.

hmmm (none / 0) (#49)
by khallow on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 02:55:35 PM EST

Come to think of it, I'd vote it to +1 FP just because it's well written and all.

Stating the obvious since 1969.
[ Parent ]

+1FP, person shooting themselves in the foot (none / 1) (#47)
by Enlarged to Show Texture on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 02:21:08 PM EST

Literally.

I was waiting for you to talk about someone getting peppered Dick Cheney style, but I can wait for part 2...


"Those people who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do." -- Isaac Asimov
PART TWO IS THIS SATURDAY (none / 1) (#48)
by GhostOfTiber on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 02:25:56 PM EST

I WILL BE SURE TO SHOOT SOMEONE IN THE FACE FOR YOU, BRO.

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

DO IT RIGHT (none / 1) (#50)
by Enlarged to Show Texture on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 03:00:32 PM EST

Cheney shot his hunting partner in the back, Uncle Fester-style.


"Those people who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do." -- Isaac Asimov
[ Parent ]
Come again? (none / 0) (#52)
by Blond Treehorn Thug on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 03:16:42 PM EST

"one of those movies when someone is shooting animals and then you find out at the end that it's really Furry Jesus and they try to guilt trip you into joining their church"

Wait, what?

I am amused by the simplicity of this game. Bring me your finest meats and cheeses.

Do you know Furry Jesus? (none / 0) (#53)
by GhostOfTiber on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 03:45:14 PM EST

Would you like to accept Furry Jesus?

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

This is the first time I have ever heard of Furry (none / 1) (#54)
by Blond Treehorn Thug on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 03:48:35 PM EST

Jesus; hopefully it is also the last.

I am amused by the simplicity of this game. Bring me your finest meats and cheeses.
[ Parent ]
Oh dear (none / 1) (#55)
by some nerd on Tue Sep 18, 2007 at 06:59:59 PM EST

Fucking furries

--
Home Sweet Home

[ Parent ]
Sorry, you are going straight to hell (none / 0) (#56)
by blaaf on Wed Sep 19, 2007 at 12:56:19 AM EST

shooting innocent mourning doves.

Why? What is the point?

Even my crusty ol' gramp says that the cry of a mourning dove means somebody just died, and you don't shoot one unless you want some seriously bad luck.

So much for your karma.

PHILADELPHIA = TEH HOLOCAUST (none / 0) (#59)
by GhostOfTiber on Wed Sep 19, 2007 at 08:22:45 AM EST

Every time you buy french fries in Philadelphia, YOU'RE BUYING FRIES FROM HITLER.

Have you ever seen a dove or pigeon beg?

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

it's == it is (none / 0) (#60)
by a boy and his bike on Wed Sep 19, 2007 at 09:31:17 AM EST

nt

I used to hunt dove as a kid (none / 0) (#62)
by 7h3647h32in6 on Wed Sep 19, 2007 at 03:17:58 PM EST

There is nothing better than fried dove, biscuits, and honey for breakfast.

dove omlette? (nt) (none / 0) (#63)
by GhostOfTiber on Wed Sep 19, 2007 at 03:58:48 PM EST


[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

But (none / 0) (#65)
by Scrymarch on Fri Sep 21, 2007 at 10:46:17 PM EST

Couldn't you have just thrown a rock at the bird on the power line?

sports authority has a mossberg for 179 (none / 0) (#66)
by newb4b0 on Wed Oct 24, 2007 at 05:05:41 PM EST

might have been an 18 gauge thouhg..
MY MOSSBERG GOES BOOM!

http://www.netmoneychat.com| NetMoneyChat Forums. No Registration necessary. Ya'll.

DID U GET IT? (none / 0) (#67)
by GhostOfTiber on Wed Oct 24, 2007 at 05:30:55 PM EST

They're competing with Dicks, they just had the 500 series on sale for $200 even.

But, I already own an OU and love the thing to death.

[Nimey's] wife's ass is my cocksheath. - undermyne
[ Parent ]

no i would definately go on a murderous rampage (none / 1) (#68)
by newb4b0 on Sun Oct 28, 2007 at 01:57:26 AM EST

and ride on my enemies with it.
MY MOSSBERG GOES BOOOM

http://www.netmoneychat.com| NetMoneyChat Forums. No Registration necessary. Ya'll.
[ Parent ]

lol i was not being serious about that last post (none / 0) (#69)
by newb4b0 on Sun Oct 28, 2007 at 01:59:45 AM EST

the fbi pays people to monitor my posts, lol? Or it is just doing packet inspection at hidden routers

http://www.netmoneychat.com| NetMoneyChat Forums. No Registration necessary. Ya'll.
[ Parent ]

Observations on Dove Hunting | 69 comments (48 topical, 21 editorial, 1 hidden)
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