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[P]
Press one for mayhem

By Tatarigami in Internet
Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 09:12:38 AM EST
Tags: Humour (all tags)
Humour

I've worked on an ISP helpdesk for just over two years now, starting out as a billing support agent, working my way up into the technical queue, and then making a detour sideways into email. Recently I was given the 'opportunity' to return to my roots for a while and answer some support calls. I accepted as graciously as I was able (no fatalities, but the project manager is going to be limping for a while). The experience brought back to mind a few of the more memorable calls and statistics I took, way back when...


Longest a customer ever spoke with no encouragement from me (I had my phone on mute the entire time): 22 minutes.

Greatest number of four-letter words used by someone writing to me for a job: 8.

Number of times a manager promised to fire me to get an irate customer to go away: 5.

Worst thing to hear at the start of a call: "I'm an MCSE."

Fastest call to turn ugly without warning: "My ex-husband must have finally figured out he's been paying my internet charges for the last six months, because he cancelled the account. Good joke on him, huh? Now I'd like you to reactivate it for me."

Most surreal call: "I wrote DOS, Windows 3.1 and Linux before I started your parent company. Now my account has been cancelled, but I really need it reopened because all the other ISPs in this city are part of the homosexual conspiracy."

Most unsuccessful demand for a refund: "I got my ten year-old son to click the accept button, so I haven't agreed to pay anything, mister."

Biggest now-you-tell-me factor: "Wait, before you delete it all, can you save my thesis research?"

Biggest what-has-this-got-to-do-with-it factor: A woman who wanted to tell me how she'd been hospitalised with necrotizing faciitus (flesh eating bacteria) at the beginning of 1999.

Second biggest what-has-this-got-to-do-with-it factor: "Listen, I'm a surgeon. Don't try and tell me the internet can't go any faster."

Biggest I've-been-conned factor: The cancer victim debilitated by a stroke who broke down and cried on the phone, leading me to bend the rules and refund his charges -- just like the previous three operators he spoke with...

User who missed the point by the widest margin: "I'm not asking you about the internet, I want to know why my email is late. Where's the postman?"

Mellowest user: Waited in the phone queue for over ten minutes just to ask me what the date was.

Worst case of good intentions gone bad: the immigrant language student who wouldn't rest until he received an apology from the general manager for the blatant racism of an operator offering to transfer him to someone fluent in his native language.

Clearest case of too much free time: the woman who complained of the sexist attitude we displayed by using a photo montage to illustrate a news story about a local politician, based on the logic that by cutting up photos of a woman, we were symbolically cutting up the woman herself, reducing her to the status of an object.

Biggest we-can't-match-that factor: "Well, your competition says they can connect me at 56k on my 9600 baud modem, so what do you say to that?"

I remember it all as if it was yesterday... which is why the next time they want me back on the phones to help out, they're going to have to do more than just take a loved one hostage.

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Press one for mayhem | 40 comments (38 topical, 2 editorial, 0 hidden)
at least you get paid for that (3.60 / 5) (#2)
by claudine on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 07:45:39 AM EST

I have to give tech support to friends and family! Had a dull day - I really needed those laughs.

--
I don't have a .sig


Remember this? (none / 0) (#15)
by Neolith on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 12:37:13 PM EST

"Yes, I work with computers..." by dead_radish:



[ Parent ]
The first lesson... (none / 0) (#28)
by Tatarigami on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 06:33:19 PM EST

The first lesson I learned here was don't give your email address to family. Seriously, if they call you up at home, you can at least put on a funny accent and pretend to be your flatmate. Better yet, pretend you don't understand english at all.

[ Parent ]
Memories (4.90 / 11) (#3)
by Phil the Canuck on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 08:03:33 AM EST

As much as I hated my only call center job, it has most of my best work memories. Every once in a while, you get that special caller.

(we join mid-conversation with a locally infamous upper-class twit)
Customer: I pay your wages, and you'll do what I #%@&ing say, you stupid little (string of profanities)...

Me: Sir, if you continue to use profanities I'll be forced to terminate this call.

Customer: The hell you will. If you hang up on me, I'll have Vern (independant contractor who had no control over my employment) fire you, you sonofabitch. You'll be in the #%@&ing unemployment line tomorrow, you (another long string of profanities)..."

Me: (click)

A short time later:

Me: (standard company greeting)

Customer: You #%@&ing little prick, no one hangs up on me...

Me: Sure they do. (click)

He didn't call back, but did try to get me fired for being abusive. Sadly, for him anyway, all calls were recorded to enure the highest level of customer service.

------

I don't think being an idiot comes with a pension plan though. Unless you're management of course. - hulver

This is funny to me, but for different reasons. (4.12 / 8) (#4)
by theboz on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 08:09:30 AM EST

It's amusing to see helpdesk people complain about stupid users in much the same way system administrators, DBAs, programmers, etc. complain about phone monkeys being the clueless morons.

As a developer, I get calls constantly that the system I work with is down because they can't get to it. When asking them if they've been able to ping the server, they respond with "what's that?" I've also had to explain to helpdesk people how to go to Start>Run and type in cmd to get a command prompt, and exactly what MS-DOS is so they could try pinging my server.

So basically, all of your derision towards users can go back upon all of your coworkers and probably yourself in some situations. Yes there are morons out there, and yes sometimes it's funny, but all of the "stupid user" stories are a bit old. We all have to deal with people like that, it's nothing new.

Stuff.

Ooh! (1.00 / 2) (#8)
by sventhatcher on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 08:51:42 AM EST

<blockquote>
<i>
As a developer, I get calls constantly that the system I work with is down because they can't get to it. When asking them if they've been able to ping the server, they respond with "what's that?" I've also had to explain to helpdesk people how to go to Start>Run and type in cmd to get a command prompt, and exactly what MS-DOS is so they could try pinging my server.
</i>
</blockquote>
Are there any openings? =)
<p>
I hate dealing with tech support when I have a problem, because they have to assume I'm an idiot. You'ld think they'd know better when I go into the call offering to email traceroutes, but no! It'd be nice to be tech support so I could try to give people the benefit of the doubt.
<p>
I once had an ISP tech support guy tell me that my periodic internet access blackouts to everything but the ISPs domain was due to hardware modem issues. ABSURD!
<p>
I also enjoyed helping a MS support guy findout that the format.com on my Win98 CD was somehow corruted and thus caused my FAT table to be funky and reject Win98 installation.
<p>
They ususally immediately transfer me to someone who doesn't read from the book. =)

[ Parent ]
Ooh! (3.00 / 2) (#9)
by sventhatcher on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 08:52:38 AM EST

As a developer, I get calls constantly that the system I work with is down because they can't get to it. When asking them if they've been able to ping the server, they respond with "what's that?" I've also had to explain to helpdesk people how to go to Start>Run and type in cmd to get a command prompt, and exactly what MS-DOS is so they could try pinging my server.
Are there any openings? =)

I hate dealing with tech support when I have a problem, because they have to assume I'm an idiot. You'ld think they'd know better when I go into the call offering to email traceroutes, but no! It'd be nice to be tech support so I could try to give people the benefit of the doubt.

I once had an ISP tech support guy tell me that my periodic internet access blackouts to everything but the ISPs domain was due to hardware modem issues. ABSURD!

I also enjoyed helping a MS support guy findout that the format.com on my Win98 CD was somehow corruted and thus caused my FAT table to be funky and reject Win98 installation.

They ususally immediately transfer me to someone who doesn't read from the book. =)

*hates it when he forgets to switch to HTML formatted*

[ Parent ]

Yay QS9000! (none / 0) (#35)
by Elkor on Wed Jul 11, 2001 at 08:45:20 AM EST

Some companies have quality procedures/checklists that tech people are supposed to go through. As "phone calls may be monitored for quality purposes" they can get a quality ding if they don't follow the procedure every single cotton picking time.

For me, when I used our tech support, I did my best to get the same guy each time. He eventually figured out that I have a clue and that we could skip the "is the computer plugged in" type questions.

Regards,
Elkor


"I won't tell you how to love God if you don't tell me how to love myself."
-Margo Eve
[ Parent ]
Procedure (none / 0) (#36)
by sventhatcher on Wed Jul 11, 2001 at 08:56:47 AM EST

Procedure is generally stupid, since an experience tech support guy should be able to figure out the problem, if it's a common one, regardless of the competency of the user. =)

[ Parent ]
Never said it made sense. :) (4.33 / 3) (#37)
by Elkor on Wed Jul 11, 2001 at 12:58:08 PM EST

Most of the stupid procedures are laid down by people who don't know better.

We recently had to revamp most of our QS9000 procedures because they hadn't been updated for several years.

The reason they hadn't been updated was because when they were written, in order to change a procedure required the approval of 6 different people, only 2 of whom had anything to do with whatever procedure was in question.

And half the things we made procedures should have been "Work Instructions" that need a lower level of approval.

Never underestimate the inefficiency of burauecracy!

Regards,
Elkor


"I won't tell you how to love God if you don't tell me how to love myself."
-Margo Eve
[ Parent ]
Training (4.00 / 2) (#29)
by Tatarigami on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 06:40:01 PM EST

If you ask me, society started to crumble when they stopped teaching the command line interface in highschool computing classes (at least in this country).

Mind you, there could be a method in the madness. In my company, they took the precaution of disabling the Run and DOS prompts and giving us a GUI ping util -- just in case of disgruntled soon-to-be ex-employees...

[ Parent ]
Training (none / 0) (#32)
by odaiwai on Wed Jul 11, 2001 at 12:48:26 AM EST

When I was in school there was a huge difference in ability and understanding between those of us who'd had to learn on Apple ]['s and BBC's via basic and assembler and those who were learning on the newer Apples with Comal and Logo.

The Basic and Assembler crew were used to being able to make the machines do things. With Comal (sort of a cut down pascal) you couldn't really do anything outside the artifical boundaries of the language.

dave
-- "They're chefs! Chefs with chainsaws!"
[ Parent ]
Teknikul Ejukashun (none / 0) (#34)
by Tatarigami on Wed Jul 11, 2001 at 01:00:41 AM EST

The Basic and Assembler crew were used to being able to make the machines do things. With Comal (sort of a cut down pascal) you couldn't really do anything outside the artifical boundaries of the language.

My first programming course was taken -- seriously -- in a macro language for the school's word processor package. We 'learned' to code by reading photocopied articles from a computing magazine. Changing the text's background colour was about the limit of what we could do. Within a week I was convinced that as a career, programming really, really bites.

The following year I was on a polytech course and they started teaching me to code in C++ -- whee!

:o)


[ Parent ]
take a swing onto the other side (2.80 / 5) (#5)
by MicroBerto on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 08:20:57 AM EST

I did technical support during high school for an ISP in Cleveland for 3 summers - and then got bumped up to systems administration.

However, I'm now back on the bottom of the ladder - at a corporate helpdesk, where employees call in for help. It's a much different game - everyone is a coworker and a friend, not the enemy! It's so much nicer when everyone is nice to you, although I seldomly had hostile customers that i couldn't quell at the old job

Berto
- GAIM: MicroBerto
Bertoline - My comic strip

I always liked doing corporate helpdesk (none / 0) (#31)
by PopeFelix on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 10:04:27 PM EST

Looking back, I find that I liked doing employee tech support better than ISP tech support. With the employees, I could just walk over to their cubicles, fix the problem, or tell them what to do, and go back to my desk.

Post No Bills


[ Parent ]
RTFM (2.33 / 3) (#7)
by Moghedien on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 08:47:17 AM EST

Hehe, funny stuff.
For more helpdesk stories, I'd recommend the RTFM!-section of ubergoth.net.

---
[57 68 6F 20 63 61 72 65 73 2E]


Gack... (none / 0) (#16)
by dgwatson on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 12:37:19 PM EST

That site has some funny stuff, but whoever made it REALLY needs to learn how to make things readable - for those of use without the best eyesight, white on black (or light grey on dark grey) are EXTREMELY hard to read...

[ Parent ]
Most annoying call to tech help (4.28 / 7) (#10)
by Karmakaze on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 10:18:26 AM EST

Before tech line folks get ready to complain - the problem with this call was not the tech help's fault... Or mine. I had a boss who came to me with every little computer problem she had, but then categorically refused to believe anything I told her.

It went as follows.

Me: Hi, my boss xxx xxx cannot access her email. I need you to give me a trouble ticket number.
Tech: Okay, your number is #xxxx. What happens when she tries to connect?
Me: I have no idea. She just told me she couldn't connect and left.
Tech: Well, can you go to her computer and try...
Me: No. I can't.
Tech: Why not?
Me: Because she has a laptop and took it home with her.
Tech: You know I can't help you if you don't have the computer and can't describe the problem.
Me: Of course I know that.
Tech: Then what do you want me to do?
Me: Nothing. I'll leave the ticket number on a posty on her desk to prove I called. The mail server was down for a while this afternoon. Chances are it will have magically fixed itself when she comes in tomorrow morning.
Tech: Right, it was. If you knew that, why did you call me?
Me: (1) Because she's my boss and she told me to call tech help for her and get a trouble ticket started and (2) because I'd rather waste five minutes talking to you than half an hour trying to explain it to her.
Tech: Oh. Okay, then. Bye.
Me: Nice talking to you.

I got along very well with that help department after they got to know me. I called them with outages and informed my cow-orkers of status so they didn't get flooded with calls and they called me when they wanted to know what the road conditions were like (they were in the basement and I was on the third floor near a window). It worked well.


--
Karmakaze

Best support moment... (4.25 / 8) (#11)
by /dev/niall on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 10:48:59 AM EST

... was when a guy at a large package moving company with three letters started explaining to me how a program worked... a program I wrote.

The program was a pretty small part of a larger application; basically all it did was download some databases at night from a central server and play with the data a little so it would be ready to generate reports quickly in the morning when the bean counters come in.

This guy was swift. He actually had a friend of mine who did the local technical support come down so he could complain about the program as it didn't work.

Him: This program sucks! I set it up and when I come to work in the morning there's nothing there!

My friend: Hmm, nobody else seems to have a problem. Tell me exactly how you set it up.

Him: Well, I tell it what data I want, what time I want to get it at, then I shut down my machine, and when I turn it back on in the morning there's nothing there!

My friend: Let's slowly step through that last part together...



Taking it step by step (5.00 / 3) (#13)
by spring on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 12:12:06 PM EST

Him: This program sucks! I set it up and when I come to work in the morning there's nothing there!

My friend: Hmm, nobody else seems to have a problem. Tell me exactly how you set it up.

Him: Well, I tell it what data I want, what time I want to get it at, then I shut down my machine, and when I turn it back on in the morning there's nothing there!

My friend: Let's slowly step through that last part together...

See, this completely fascinates me. There's a certain skill -- I'm not even sure whether it has a good name or not. Perhaps it's "step-by-steppitude" or "methodicalness" or whatever. It's the ability to see the facts and report the facts. It seems simple to us as computer people, but it's obviously not a simple skill based on the vast number of people who don't have it. And that mindset is essential to solving any kind of technical problem.

My first step when I detect that panicky "It just doesn't work. Fix it" tone in the caller's voice is to take them back to that factual level. My canned phrase is, "What are the symptoms?" That seems to help them calm down and report what's in front of their nose.

I don't expect people to understand the problems they want me to fix. All I ask is that they tell me exactly what they see and not leave anything out.

[ Parent ]

Just the facts m'am... (none / 0) (#24)
by /dev/niall on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 03:52:05 PM EST

See, this completely fascinates me. There's a certain skill -- I'm not even sure whether it has a good name or not. Perhaps it's "step-by-steppitude" or "methodicalness" or whatever. It's the ability to see the facts and report the facts. It seems simple to us as computer people, but it's obviously not a simple skill based on the vast number of people who don't have it. And that mindset is essential to solving any kind of technical problem.

Remembering my tech support days, I absolutely agree. Having the user report in detail the steps they took that led up to a problem was helpful in more ways then one.

You must remember, of course, those users who refuse to do so... you know, the "fix it now! I can't be bothered to explain what I did! I am more important than you!" types.

Far be it from me to call all users stupid. I do think, however, that anyone who cannot grasp the concept of electricity and the effect of it's absence upon electrical equipment should not be allowed to operate anything more advanced than a spoon. ;)


--
"compared to the other apes, my genitals are gigantic" -- TheophileEscargot
[ Parent ]

Good idea... (none / 0) (#25)
by dgwatson on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 04:18:42 PM EST

They might put the spoon in an outlet, and then we'd have some fun...

Unless it tripped the breaker/blew a fuse, in which case it's not so much fun. :)

[ Parent ]
Didn't think of that... (none / 0) (#27)
by /dev/niall on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 05:28:45 PM EST

... maybe I should be using a spoon too. ;)

Perhaps I should have said "wooden or plastic" spoons. Of course, they might get splinters.

And plastic... when my wife was dating she went out with a guy who accidently ate a plastic fork. He was crunching away when my future spouse pointed out his fork was looking a little damaged. He just spat out the plastic that he hadn't swallowed and continued to eat as though nothing had happened.

It's guys like him that make me look somewhat normal, and for that I thank him.

--
"compared to the other apes, my genitals are gigantic" -- TheophileEscargot
[ Parent ]

The reasons why (5.00 / 3) (#26)
by spring on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 04:29:46 PM EST

It occurs to me that there are two possible explanations for attitude:
  1. The user assumes that computers are far more simple than they actually are. Perhaps they honestly expect us to whip an answer to them off the tops of our heads when they come to us with their terrible descriptions. In this world, a problem like "The Internet is broken" is surely a problem that we computer people receive a dozen times a day, and every computer literate person knows the answer is, "Oh, just press Alt-F7, then type 'intnt'." If we would just tell them what keys to press, that would fix everything. The fact that we won't just tell them the magic key sequence to get things going again, that we hem and haw and make them feel dumb by asking all these questions that they don't know the answers to, means that we're jerking them around. The answer is really stupid and obvious, and we could tell them immediately, but we're arrogant dweebs, drunk with the power that our nerdy trivia brings us, and we won't.
  2. The users think that we possess a cool and vast intelligence, capable of comprehending at a glance all we survey. If we can understand something as complicated as a computer, surely we don't need a whole lot of useless details to figure out their little problems.


[ Parent ]
Troubleshoot this! (none / 0) (#39)
by kentm on Wed Jul 11, 2001 at 05:27:32 PM EST

I work bug fixing a horrible C++ GUI application. The customers submit bugs to our helpdesk, and then I get the bug report, and go find and fix the bug.

I'm constantly amazed at how terse and useless the bug reports are. I almost feel like they don't really want the problem to get fixed.

"Uh, there was a problem on a screen"

bleah!


[ Parent ]
Don't Panic! (none / 0) (#38)
by kentm on Wed Jul 11, 2001 at 05:17:43 PM EST

The panic is pretty amazing. The only person I do support for is my mom (Thank goodness!). Sometimes it is pretty funny, because once something starts to go wrong, she forgets every computer skill she has!

I remember one call where I needed her to rename a file and she was adamant that she didn't know how to do it. I was finally able to convince her that yes, she did do this on a regular basis without my help. Once I got her calmed down, we were able to get the problem fixed!

I don't want to defend the truly inept, but we often forget how intimidating a computer is to a casual user. I read a book about User Interface design, and there was an example about how users see popup dialogs:

The text was "Erase hard disk?" and the buttons were "Now" and "Later".

I've got that pinned up next to my computer! (Unfortunately, I can't remember the name of the book or the author!)


[ Parent ]
I'm a doctor! (4.16 / 6) (#12)
by AgentGray on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 12:01:06 PM EST

I worked for a local provider for one year before they were bought out by Earthstink.

We had this well-known doctor who would call every day...every day. They were simple questions to answer, but he was constantly foiled by the paper clip in Netscape. No matter how hard he tried, he couldn't figure out how to send an attachment (most of the time he was)

There was a period where he didn't call for two weeks. (We had a whiteboard with a calendar on it with X's marked on the days he called. We thought he may have been dead. Nope. He was on vacation, or so he told us when we he got back.

I was the only one there who had the patience to deal with him. I actually got a big kick out of it. Better to talk to him for a half hour than listen to people whine about their email and read sent emails saying their email doesn't work.

Anyway, one day the doctor called and asked for some support on his Compaq. I told him we couldn't do it and that he should call compaq tech support. He said he was banned from there. That didn't surprise me. However, a whole week went by and he asked for computer suport every day. After a couple of days of this, I got a call from a very frustrated Compaq technician. It was in regard to our good doctor.

It appears that the doctor had a separate line for his internet service installed in his house. He ran the phone line from a splitter outside his house and drilled a hole straight through the outter wall into where his computer was located. Naturally, when it rained water would travel down the line and fry his system.

He went through three Compaqs in one week.

2 hours of pure pain (4.88 / 9) (#14)
by Lord13 on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 12:36:57 PM EST

I'll share one:

I spent 2 hours on the phone with a users who literrly did not know left from right:

Me: Ok, now go to Start | Programs | Windows Explorer.
User: Start?
Me: Yep, click on the Start button in the lower lefthand corner.
User: I don't see a "Start" button. I just see the time.
Me: Uh, Is that the lower right corner or the lower left corner?
User: The lower left corner.
Me: Ok, what's in the lower right corner?
User: Oh! There is it!
Me: Great! Now find Programs and then click on Windows Explorer.
User: With the left or right button?
Me: Uh, Left.....I mean Right.
User: It didn't work.
Me: Try again, this time use the other button.
User: Ok! It worked, now what?
Me: You should see a bunch of folders on the left side, correct.
User: Nope, I just see a grey bar.
Me: Ok, Could you please hold up your left hand and extend your index finger and thumb?
User: Uh....ok.
Me: Does the index finger and thumb make the shape of the letter L?
User: Yes, but it's backwords.
Me: Ok, that's your right hand, not your left. Your index finger and thumb on your left hand will make the proper shape of the letter L; for Left, ok?
User: Oh ok.
Me: <Looking for spork to stab heart and end the pain>

I had to remind her about the L for left hand rule a couple of times.

Growing half a tree, water it everyday.
I just remembered this one.... (4.00 / 1) (#17)
by Lord13 on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 12:49:01 PM EST


User: Is that Zero as in Zero or Zero as in O?

Growing half a tree, water it everyday.
[ Parent ]
Another one.... (4.00 / 2) (#21)
by Lord13 on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 02:40:33 PM EST

Me: Your new password is 123456.
User: Is that in upper or lower case?

Growing half a tree, water it everyday.
[ Parent ]
Brain injury? (none / 0) (#30)
by Tatarigami on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 08:12:18 PM EST

Not meaning to be sarcastic with that subject, but I seem to recall reading about a brain condition which destroys the victim's ability to tell left from right. I can't remember now whether it was a form of epilepsy or an extreme kind of dyslexia, but it was severe enough to get the suffererss driver's licences revoked.

[ Parent ]
Which reminds me... (none / 0) (#40)
by Teaflax on Sun Jul 15, 2001 at 11:21:52 PM EST

...of the immortal lines of one of my ex-girlfriend's pals:

"I just can't tell left from right."

*beat*

"Well, I know which one right is..."

[ Parent ]
Sometimes you get one back though (4.50 / 8) (#18)
by clayton on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 12:53:45 PM EST

Some years ago an ISP I worked for had a screen which monitored logins in real time to allow us to see if users were doing something wrong. About 8 one night I'm looking at the screen for user X when I see user Y's username flash by all in uppercase (we only issue lower case usernames). By chance, user Y's registration form is on the desk in front of me -- with his mobile number. On a whim I pick up the phone -- all the while watching him trying to log in again and again. When he answered I simply said "You need to change the username to lowercase or it'll never work" and waited. Never managed to shock a user quite that much. He changed the username and logged straight in. The next day we had the most gushing e-mail to support I've ever seen.
turnover is vanity, profit is sanity, cash is reality
He would have been more impressed (3.00 / 2) (#19)
by delmoi on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 01:31:55 PM EST

if you had actualy called him :P
--
"'argumentation' is not a word, idiot." -- thelizman
[ Parent ]
Ok, I can't read (2.50 / 2) (#20)
by delmoi on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 01:32:39 PM EST

You did, somehow I missed that. *sigh*
--
"'argumentation' is not a word, idiot." -- thelizman
[ Parent ]
been there, done that (none / 0) (#22)
by AgentGray on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 02:41:24 PM EST

Yeah, the shock is great.

There where numerous times we did that monitoring the radius.

Amazing, there was always someone dialing in wrong...

[ Parent ]
Strangest support call I never got. (3.50 / 4) (#23)
by endquote on Tue Jul 10, 2001 at 03:22:48 PM EST

I work for a large support organization, though I'm no longer an analyst. Recently I got a call from an analyst asking me if I could help him out with a call. Since this was a rather odd thing for this guy to ask my curiosity was raised.
So I head over to his desk, seems he has some code from a customer that he'd like me to look at. At his screen I am greeted by the headers of a strangely familiar piece of code. In fact it had my name in it.
Seems that a small program I'd written, years before when I'd worked for the customer as a Co-op, was still in use and had broken during a recent upgrade :-)

I was amazed. It had been 5 years, and the code was origionally intended to be in use for maybe a few months.

Even better (4.00 / 1) (#33)
by odaiwai on Wed Jul 11, 2001 at 12:57:18 AM EST

Back story: When I started working in 1990, I was doing a lot of dbase programming for an engineering consulting company. Programs to analyse data or convert it from one form to another. Simple stuff. That was in England.

Ten years later, I start a new job in Hong Kong and I overseeing the conversion of some data files. One of the junior guys shows me this program they use to do the conversion...

Yep, you guessed it. One of mine.

I was boggled.

dave
-- "They're chefs! Chefs with chainsaws!"
[ Parent ]
Press one for mayhem | 40 comments (38 topical, 2 editorial, 0 hidden)
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