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[P]
The intellectual impact of kuro5hin.org

By Delirium in Meta
Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 02:50:04 PM EST
Tags: kuro5hin, ivory tower, intellectual powerhouse (all tags)
kuro5hin

Those of us who've been posting at Kuro5hin for some years are aware that this site serves as one of the foremost intellectual fora of the present day. What may come as a surprise is that a number of academics recognize that fact, and cite Kuro5hin in their journal articles, conference proceedings, and book chapters. Here I survey some of the more interesting ones I've come across.


In no particular order. I've tried to link to freely available articles where possible, but note that some require payment or access through a university to read.

The Atari 2600

Nick Montfort (2006). Combat in Context. Game Studies 6(1).

In an article about the Atari VCS game Combat, focusing on the close relationship between its game design and the features supported by the Atari's graphics hardware, Montfort quotes localroger's 2001 story "Programming the Atari 2600 VCS" for a comment localroger made on the close coupling between game code and low-level screen-drawing code on the machine: "I've never heard of an Atari VCS game that crashed and now I know why. There simply isn't room for the kind of sloppiness that allows a crash-level bug to slip through. If you're that sloppy, it won't even draw the screen."

E-mail filtering

Sarah Jane Delany & Derek Bridge (2006). Feature-Based and Feature-Free Textual CBR: A Comparison in Spam Filtering. In Proceedings of the 17th Irish Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science (AICS '06), pp. 244-253.

The authors propose (among other things) to use compression in the context of spam filtering, and claim that this doesn't seem to have been tried in the computer science literature before. They do however credit a 2003 story by KWillets, "Spam Filtering with gzip", for first proposing the idea. A laudable and somewhat surprising citation, since in my experience, an academic who realizes that some non-academic thought of his idea first will, rather than cite him, simply pretend he doesn't exist.

Alternative DNS

Enda Brophy (2002). The Outlaw 'Net': Opposition to ICANN's New Internet Order. ACM SIGCAS Computers and Society 32(4).

This article, surveying various alternative DNS schemes among other things, mentions Arkady's 2000 article "An Immodest DNS proposal" and its ensuing discussion.

File-sharing communities

Lior Jacob Strahilevitz (2003). Charismatic Code, Social Norms, and the Emergence of Cooperation on the File-Swapping Networks. Virginia Law Review 89(3), pp. 505-595.

In a law-review article discussing the dynamics of file-sharing communities and giving some thoughts on the possible effects of different proposed responses, a footnote cites a 2000 comment by Chakotay, with subject line "Distributed file sharing system problematics", in which the poster discusses freeloading on filesharing networks being bandwidth-related.

Website metrics

Yanlong Zhang, Hong Zhu & Sue Greenwood (2005). Empirical Validation of Website Timeliness Measures. In Proceedings of the 29th Annual International Computer Software and Applications Conference (COMPSAC '05).

The authors discuss and validate some measures for websites' "timeliness", and cite as previous work a 2002 article by tes, "Developing a Basic Numerical Metric for Web Usability".

Why XSLT sucks

Oleg Kiselyov (2005). Implementing Metcast in Scheme. Higher-Order and Symbolic Computation 18(3-4), pp. 355-370. (Older but free version.)

An article mostly about something else, but it cites tmoertel's 2002 article "XSLT, Perl, Haskell, & a word on language design" for the claim: "The XSLT Recommendation explicitly states that XSLT is designed for a limited set of simple transformations and intentionally lacks general-purpose functionality. Other practitioners have observed that these limitations are quite severe: many common transformation tasks become excruciatingly difficult to express in XSLT."

Apparently tmoertel's critique of XSLT is one of the most visible early ones, because it's also cited by several other papers in similar ways.

Testing Haskell code

Koen Claessen & John Hughes (2002). Testing Monadic Code with QuickCheck. ACM SIGPLAN Notices 37(12), pp. 65-77.

The authors discuss a tool they developed, QuickCheck, that's intended to ease testing of Haskell code. Another cite for tmoertel, as they put forth a 2001 article of his that mentions the tool favorably, "Seven Lessons from the ICFP Programming Contest", as evidence that QuickCheck is actually useful in practice.

Nupedia and Wikipedia

Andreas Neus (2001). Managing Information Quality in Virtual Communities of Practice. In Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Information Quality at MIT (IQ '01).

Stuart Minor Benjamin (2006). Evaluating E-Rulemaking: Public Participation and Political Institutions. Duke Law Journal 55, pp. 893-941.

This pair of articles cites two quite different stories by lsanger in which he editorializes about free online encylopedias. The first article cites lsanger's 2001 story "Britannica or Nupedia? The Future of Free Encyclopedias" in support of the argument that open knowledge-production communities can produce high-quality content. The second article cites his 2004 story "Why Wikipedia Must jettison Its Anti-Elitism" as evidence that keeping "cranks", "trolls and flamers", and "partisans" off Wikipedia is a real problem. Sanger's later, more contrarian, article is cited by some other papers as well.

OpenBSD firewalls

Eduardo B. Fernandez, Maria M. Larrondo-Petrie, Naeem Seliya, Nelly Delessy-Gassant & Markus Schumacher (2003). A Pattern Language for Firewalls. In Proceedings of the 10th Conference on Pattern Languages of Programs.

The authors cite scubacuda's 2002 article, "Guide to OpenBSD Packet Filtering Firewalls" as the canonical reference on OpenBSD packet-filtering firewalls.

Governments and free software

Lawrence Lessig (2002). Open Source Baselines: Compared to What? In Government Policy Toward Open Source Software, Brookings Institution Press, pp. 50-68.

Lessig cites Andy Tai's 2002 article "Taiwan to start national plan to push Free Software" for its description of what the government of Taiwan is doing with regards to Free Software.

MMORPG slavery

Nicholas Taylor (2006). Globalization, New Media, and Dissent: A Functionalist Analysis of the Dislocation of Interests. Georgetown University Masters Thesis.

Well, this is an odd one. The thesis cites Imperfect's 2003 article "HOWTO: Make Money Off Your Addiction", which details how one can profit by playing a lot of MMORPGs, in support of the following sentence, which appears amidst a longer discussion on sweatshops and so forth: "So-called 'click slavery' is a term specific to massively-multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) that describes how the most efficient production of value in game worlds, vis--vis the generation of saleable virtual artifacts or the accumulation of game currency, depends on boringly repetitive tasks: sitting around and waiting for monsters, items, or quests to spawn and traveling long distances." This despite the fact that Imperfect's article never used the term "click slavery", and actually described his experiences as positive and fun, quite contrary to how they're characterized here.

Audiogalaxy

Peter Eckersley (2004). Virtual Markets for Virtual Goods: The Mirror Image of Digital Copyright? Harvard Journal of Law and Technology 18(1), pp. 85-166.

This article, though mostly going into a much broader discussion not really related to the citation, nonetheless cites kennon's 2002 story, "R.I.P. Audiogalaxy", as the definitive reference for a history of the rise and fall of the filesharing system Audiogalaxy. Kuro5hin also gets a meta-mention as a "collaborative media site".

Dumpster diving

Jeff Shantz (2005). One Person's Garbage...Another Person's Treasure: Dumpster Diving, Freeganism, And Anarchy. VERB 3(1).

This overview of and paean to DIYism, "freeganism", dumpster diving, and miscellaneous other ways to "challenge regimes of mass consumption" cites durkie's 2003 story "Dumpster diving: an Introduction". It quotes his observation that bakeries are a good place to get food, and notes: "This is where anarchist divers come in since rather than dumpstering for personal use, they are gathering items for collective use and free distribution." K5 builds the system, and k5 rips the system.

Prediction markets

Robert Looney (2004). DARPA's Policy Analysis Market for Intelligence: Outside the Box or Off the Wall?. International Journal of Intelligence and Counterintelligence 17(3), pp. 405-419. (Older but free version.)

This article cites a 2003 story by khallow with a much less prevaricating title, "The Policy Analysis Market: Why It is a Great Idea", since Looney basically paraphrases (quite closely, but at least with credit) the section of khallow's article entitled "PAM was just gambling".

User interfaces and your mom

Sardjawati Suleiman (2005). The Evolution of Icons: how computer icons have changed over 40 years. Oxford Brookes University Masters Thesis.

This thesis quotes an adage from dash2's 2003 story "Great UI design lies": "the [best] user interface guru is your mum".

What's not here?

Besides this sampling of citations and some others in a similar vein, kuro5hin articles are mentioned as prior art in a surprising number of U.S. patents, and there is a large body of literature commenting on kuro5hin.org itself (no doubt attempting to dissect the magic factors that make this site such an intellectual powerhouse). Perhaps a future survey shall point out some of the more interesting mentions in those contexts.

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Related Links
o Kuro5hin
o Combat in Context
o localroger
o "Programmi ng the Atari 2600 VCS"
o Feature-Ba sed and Feature-Free Textual CBR: A Comparison in Spam Filtering
o KWillets
o "Spam Filtering with gzip"
o The Outlaw 'Net': Opposition to ICANN's New Internet Order
o Arkady
o "An Immodest DNS proposal"
o Charismati c Code, Social Norms, and the Emergence of Cooperation on the File-Swapping Networks
o Chakotay
o "Distribut ed file sharing system problematics"
o Empirical Validation of Website Timeliness Measures
o tes
o "Developin g a Basic Numerical Metric for Web Usability"
o Implementi ng Metcast in Scheme
o Older but free version.
o tmoertel
o "XSLT, Perl, Haskell, & a word on language design"
o several other papers
o Testing Monadic Code with QuickCheck
o "Seven Lessons from the ICFP Programming Contest"
o Managing Information Quality in Virtual Communities of Practice
o Evaluating E-Rulemaking: Public Participation and Political Institutions
o lsanger
o "Britannic a or Nupedia? The Future of Free Encyclopedias"
o "Why Wikipedia Must jettison Its Anti-Elitism"
o some other papers
o A Pattern Language for Firewalls
o scubacuda
o "Guide to OpenBSD Packet Filtering Firewalls"
o Andy Tai
o "Taiwan to start national plan to push Free Software"
o Globalizat ion, New Media, and Dissent: A Functionalist Analysis of the Dislocation of Interests
o Imperfect
o "HOWTO: Make Money Off Your Addiction"
o Virtual Markets for Virtual Goods: The Mirror Image of Digital Copyright?
o kennon
o "R.I.P. Audiogalaxy"
o One Person's Garbage...Another Person's Treasure: Dumpster Diving, Freeganism, And Anarchy
o durkie
o "Dumpster diving: an Introduction"
o DARPA's Policy Analysis Market for Intelligence: Outside the Box or Off the Wall?
o Older but free version
o khallow
o "The Policy Analysis Market: Why It is a Great Idea"
o The Evolution of Icons: how computer icons have changed over 40 years
o dash2
o "Great UI design lies"
o Also by Delirium


Display: Sort:
The intellectual impact of kuro5hin.org | 70 comments (59 topical, 11 editorial, 1 hidden)
Oh how times have changed (none / 1) (#3)
by Stjck on Sat Dec 08, 2007 at 11:37:18 PM EST

I remember when smart people used to come here. Now it's just idiots such as I :-(

Even the smart ones (none / 1) (#66)
by porkchop_d_clown on Fri Dec 21, 2007 at 10:47:52 AM EST

are occasionally sucked back into the swamp.


People who think "clown" is an insult have never met any.
[ Parent ]
Thanks for pointing this out (2.66 / 3) (#4)
by mybostinks on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 12:05:31 AM EST

it was what attracted me to K5 years ago.

This has my fp vote.

BUT what about Crime Detective Story (2.71 / 7) (#7)
by tetsuwan on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 05:08:22 AM EST

and Egil's rantings, lol

Njal's Saga: Just like Romeo & Juliet without the romance

i hear paramount bought the movie rights $ (3.00 / 5) (#18)
by j1mmy on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 09:48:10 AM EST



[ Parent ]
some hollywood moron would probably think its gold (none / 0) (#19)
by chlorus on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 10:12:00 AM EST


Peahippo: Coked-up internet tough guy or creepy pedophile?
[ Parent ]

+1FP, Delirium (3.00 / 4) (#14)
by nostalgiphile on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 07:51:21 AM EST

thanks for this; quite valuable.

It would be equally interesting to do a survey of works where K5 articles were clearly consulted but not cited. I know of at least one article (in Harper's Magazine) where the author consulted a K5 article and didn't give credit where credit was due.  Hard to prove in most cases, sure, but I actually think 'legitimate' news sources plagiarize to hell from sites like K5.

"Depending on your perspective you are an optimist or a pessimist[,] and a hopeless one too." --trhurler

what was it? (none / 1) (#44)
by circletimessquare on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 01:55:35 PM EST



The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]
+1FP (2.33 / 3) (#16)
by Enlarged to Show Texture on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 08:58:13 AM EST

Countering ray eckson's editorial comment that the age of the quoted articles proves that K5 is dying:

K5 is not dying (except to the extent of any damage done by the trollocaust and making K5 a paysite). In the beginning, the internet as a whole was full of large numbers of highly intelligent people. However, as it begins to become more accessible to everyone, it's starting to fill up with more and more unintelligent souls. Net result: A much lower signal to noise ratio, and all our esteemed colleague is seeing is the noise rather than the signal.


"Those people who think they know everything are a great annoyance to those of us who do." -- Isaac Asimov
aka Eternal September. % (none / 1) (#34)
by Joe Sixpack on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 05:28:34 AM EST


---
[ MONKEY STEALS THE PEACH ]
[ Parent ]

This site is the worst place on the internet (1.07 / 13) (#17)
by Hiphopopotamus on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 09:44:13 AM EST

I would do anything to bring it down.
_________________

I'm In LOVE!

Indeed it is (none / 0) (#60)
by maroberts on Wed Dec 12, 2007 at 11:09:28 AM EST

But sometimes exotic plants grow out of the steaming ordure that is the majority of K5.
~~~
The greatest trick the Devil pulled was to convince the world he didn't exist -- Verbil Kint, The Usual Suspects
[ Parent ]
This is what is so great about k5 (2.94 / 17) (#20)
by Booger on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 11:52:02 AM EST

The way that serious, well-researched and carefully written informative articles can exist side-by-side with worthless pithy remarks and unasked-for jokes.  This site should be considered a model for how to transmit news and intellectual information in teh modern age.

Egil can eat a bag of dicks.

-
I did think of a derogatory term for white people--RICH. Call some white guy RICH and it doesn't matter how much money they have, they'll start squealin about how oh they wish they were rich.--tdillo

What about the discussion of topics such as (none / 1) (#21)
by Stick Apart on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 12:10:16 PM EST

drugs, addiction, pharmacology, abnormal psychology, and AI research and philosophy?

Would we be in error to also exclude disciplines such as poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction from this exploration of the impact of k5 on intellectual thought?
-------
> "I think it could easily be around 200 million people dead because of gun control." - V

SUPPORT A TEXT-FRIENDLY INTERNET

maybe I should put this in my CV (3.00 / 4) (#22)
by khallow on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 01:38:19 PM EST

I forgot my K5 article. It probably gets more academic cites than my higher spin quantum field theory papers. The only problem, of course, is that they then look at my more recent work. I'll stick it in when K5 turns back into a bad dream.

Stating the obvious since 1969.

correction (none / 0) (#23)
by khallow on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 01:54:00 PM EST

I have a paper with 18 Google scholar cites. The K5 article has only 3 cites. The other two papers that I'm coauthor for (and have an entry on Google scholar) have 3 and 1 cite respectively.

Stating the obvious since 1969.
[ Parent ]

Your committment to accuracy inspires us all. (none / 1) (#38)
by Zero Gonzales on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 12:28:35 PM EST

Thank you.
Thanks,

thank you.

[ Parent ]

No, thank you. Thank you. (none / 0) (#46)
by khallow on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 03:41:53 PM EST


Stating the obvious since 1969.
[ Parent ]

It also aides us in tracking down your identity. (none / 0) (#50)
by Josh Smith II on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 08:12:40 PM EST



-- Josh Smith recommends you take a hulver hike.
[ Parent ]
my take on this (none / 0) (#53)
by khallow on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 09:22:24 PM EST

I'm really trying hard to hide my identity here. I'd help out by posting my bank account and credit card numbers, but I'm waiting for that special Nigerian princess or handsome prime minister to sweep me off my feet.

Stating the obvious since 1969.
[ Parent ]

lolz (3.00 / 9) (#24)
by LilDebbie on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 02:27:48 PM EST

This just reaffirms my belief that academia is just the a group discussion that takes itself way too fucking seriously.

im in ur ivory tower, smearing shit on the walls.

My name is LilDebbie and I have a garden.
- hugin -

Academia = K5 (3.00 / 3) (#37)
by Sgt York on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 09:53:03 AM EST

It's one big circle jerk. Well, not exclusively. But it does have a significant circle jerk component to it. And I say that as a non-jaded scientist in academia. It's amazing depressing how much effort is put into "grantsmanship", i.e. experiments performed and presented in a way to maximize the impact on a grant. This is often nonproductive or even counterproductive to real science.

For example, I have wasted/invested a substantial portion of the past 6 months of lab work on grantsmanship projects. These are experiments that basically say and do things that can be done quickly and convincingly and generate interest, but probably are unimportant in the long run. That is, I'm not going to center a paper around these experiments. These are going to be the "rule out" figures, the ones I use to say, "You would have thought it was this, but as figure 3B shows, it's not. It's really that (fig 4A)."

And honestly, those don't have to be that important. If I craft the experiment correctly and show the data in a good way, I don't need to show it's not "this" in an independent way. The statement will be inherent in my proof that it's "that." I'm only including them because (a) the data and figures are already done, they were in the grant, and (b)Dr. Smith, the 90 year old guru of the field has "this" as his pet theory, and if I dismiss it out of hand he'll slam me on the next study section. Grantsmanship and stroking of cocks egos again.

It boils down to theatrics and stroking the egos of the kabal established guys.

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.
[ Parent ]

soft sciences education is really indoctrination (none / 1) (#43)
by circletimessquare on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 01:49:49 PM EST

unless you are talking about the really hard sciences (chemistry, physics, math), then academia is a fraternity where pledging membership to the fraternity (getting a PhD/ MS/ MA) requires submitting that your subjective opinions match the subjective opinions of those in the entrenched power structure

it's a propaganda machine, whose only purpose is to further entrench its propaganda, by manufacturing scientific validity through the giant agglomeration of self-reference

Educators destroy your brain,
but you don't know, so why care?

Creation ocurrs via opposites,
but Religious/Academia pedants
suppress it teaching Satanic One.

After 30 years of research, I now
possess the Order of Harmonic
Antipodal Cubic Divinity Life -
too large for physical form, but
Binary Spirit of the masculinity
Sun & feminity Earth Antipodes.
ONEism is demonic Death Math.
I have so much to teach you, but
you ignore me you evil asses.
You will recognize 4 corner Days
or incur Easter Island Ending.

Never a Genius knew Math
to achieve my Cubic Wisdom.
Cubic thought Reigns as the
Highest Intelligence possible
on the planet Earth. One 96
hour rotating Cube within a
single rotation of Earth -- is
an Ineffable Transcendence.
Bible and Science falsify 1
corner day for the Cubic 4
corner Days rotating daily.
A single god is not possible
in our 4 Day Cubic Science,
that equates Cubic Divinity.
Everybody is both stupid and
evil for ignoring the 4 days.

The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

Fortunately (none / 1) (#45)
by Sgt York on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 03:32:29 PM EST

Biochem apparently does not fall into that category. About half my thesis data was completely contrary to my PI's running hypothesis, which was shared by the department chair. In fact, when good hard data started first coming in, they both made me double check that I hadn't accidentally switched the labels. It was exactly the opposite of what we had expected.

But you still have to put up with the bullshit, regardless.

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.
[ Parent ]

I RUBBED PYRIDINE ON MY GONADS (none / 1) (#47)
by circletimessquare on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 03:48:34 PM EST

AND I STILL FATHER 20 KIDS

IT WAS COMPLETELY CONTRARY TO MAGNUM PI'S RUNNING HYPOTHESIS


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

Holy FUCK (3.00 / 2) (#48)
by Sgt York on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 04:21:33 PM EST

You have KIDS?

God help us....

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.
[ Parent ]

Hey (none / 1) (#57)
by Sgt York on Tue Dec 11, 2007 at 09:57:50 AM EST

Have you seen "Power to save the world" yet? Just came across a few articles about it on Wired; it seems right up your alley.

This lady that apparently used to be an anti-nuke power activist switched sides. She teemed up with an expert on nuke power safety and got tours cradle to grave on the whole thing. They go through a fuel mine, then refining, processing, power generation, and waste disposal.

'tis on my xmas list now.

There is a reason for everything. Sometimes, that reason just sucks.
[ Parent ]

god bless her (none / 1) (#58)
by circletimessquare on Tue Dec 11, 2007 at 10:16:57 AM EST

go nukes, 100%

The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]
I don't think anything falls into that category (none / 1) (#61)
by Vampire Zombie Abu Musab al Zarqawi on Thu Dec 13, 2007 at 09:23:32 AM EST

If academia was indoctrination, the academics wouldn't have anything to do. It's not indoctrination, it's a huge quarrel over (usually) insignificant details, hence the everyday meaning of the word 'academic'. Academia thrives on conflict. cts, being an uneducated assclown, doesn't know this, of course.

But of course, bullshit is one hell of a conflict-generator, which is why psychoanalysis is so important to (parts of) the humanities.

[ Parent ]

I dunno, there's a bit of both (none / 0) (#62)
by Delirium on Thu Dec 13, 2007 at 02:25:10 PM EST

It's mostly quarrel, but there are a relatively large number of unscrupulous professors who see their undergraduate classes as a good way of indoctrinating students into their view of the world. This happens even in the sciences, although there it's mostly trying to get students to take your side in some scientific dispute, instead of explicitly political indoctrination.

[ Parent ]
Meh (none / 1) (#63)
by Vampire Zombie Abu Musab al Zarqawi on Thu Dec 13, 2007 at 04:45:28 PM EST

Arguing your side of a dispute is hardly indoctrination.

Of course there are lots of shady types in academic circles just as everywhere else, I'm just saying indoctrination is not an institutional thing, just like leaving surgery equipment inside patients is frowned upon in the medical profession. Indoctrination happens, but it's usually not good for the trade. The field of economics might be an exception, but even there you need to peddle novelty theories now and then, to keep the customers interested. Small and highly politicised areas like "women's studies" and whatnot may have a problem, since crackpots feed on being marginalised and controversial, and often enjoy being the centre of a cult. To maintain the cult, though, they need to keep on the margins, which means they need to stay controversial. So even there you need quarrel.

There's far more propaganda in lower education. Academia, remarkably enough, has some sort of safe-guard against it. There's no such thing in high school.

[ Parent ]

Hard Science Indoctrination (3.00 / 3) (#67)
by cronian on Mon Dec 24, 2007 at 07:41:18 PM EST

Consider those jokes of the genre "You might Be a Physics Major if..." like this. How much of that stuff is necessary to understand physics? The rest can likely be attributed to indoctrination.

The same can be said for computer and its surrounding culture. However, the most insidious portion involves the often cult-like devotion to the performance of "scientific" tasks, and "professionalism".

In the book Disciplined Minds, Jeff Schmidt documented slave-like ideological submission in the field of professional expertise. This is brought about by academic indoctrination. Students are taught an intellectual slavery of subservience within their professional capacity, where they no longer understand self-interest.

We perfect it; Congress kills it; They make it; We Import it; It must be anti-Americanism
[ Parent ]
What are you talking about? (none / 0) (#68)
by Corwin06 on Wed Dec 26, 2007 at 11:11:47 PM EST

Students are taught an intellectual slavery of subservience within their professional capacity, where they no longer understand self-interest.

What is that?

I'm ready to explain my own unintelligible crap, please to be doing the same...

Maybe it's because of my personality, not being impressed by official titles and diplomas and all. Is that what you're talking about? Or something else entirely?

"and you sir, in an argument in a thread with a troll in a story no one is reading in a backwater website, you're a fucking genius
--circletimessquare
[ Parent ]
that's the beauty of private enterprise (none / 1) (#54)
by LilDebbie on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 11:39:16 PM EST

we get paid either way. if some jackass insists "no, this is the right way," we just shrug and say, "sure, whatever, your fucking network," and ROR when it all falls to pieces.

My name is LilDebbie and I have a garden.
- hugin -

[ Parent ]
A major problem of the peer review system (none / 1) (#65)
by A Bore on Fri Dec 14, 2007 at 06:00:45 AM EST

Many fine papers don't pass peer review because they don't suit the misconceptions of the field. A shit paper by a big lab can set research back years by confiscating the intellectual ground, and having Professor Bigscience shooting down every contrary paper in review that he's given.

"Anonymous" peer reviewers are often anything but, since the reviewer's peculiar patterns of scientific shoulder-chips fingerprint them as readily as a mugshot.

Of course, there is no right answer. There'd be a lot more shit papers out there under another system.

[ Parent ]
Anything since 2003? (2.50 / 2) (#25)
by Liar on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 03:30:33 PM EST

Granted, it may take some time for the more recent articles to make its way into a citation, but did our glory age end in 2003?


I admit I'm a Liar. That's why you can trust me.
well, there's Sanger's 2004 article (nt) (none / 1) (#26)
by Delirium on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 03:42:12 PM EST



[ Parent ]
hmm, when did people start saying 'k5 is dying'? (none / 0) (#32)
by Phssthpok on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 01:08:47 AM EST


____________

affective flattening has caused me to kill 11,357 people

[ Parent ]
K5 is dying like Apple (none / 1) (#33)
by anaesthetica on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 01:58:01 AM EST

I joined in 2002 and it was already a well-established meme.

—I'm the little engine that didn't.
k5: our trolls go to eleven
[A]S FAR AS A PERSON'S ACTIONS ARE CONCERNED, IT IS NOT TRUE THAT NOTHING BUT GOOD COMES FROM GOOD AND NOTHING BUT EVIL COMES FROM EVIL, BUT RATHER QUITE FREQUENTLY THE OPPOSITE IS THE CASE. ANYONE WHO DOES NOT REALIZE THIS IS IN FACT A MERE CHILD IN POLITICAL MATTERS. max weber, politics as a vocation


[ Parent ]
Like people, k5 was born dying. $ (3.00 / 2) (#49)
by Pentashagon on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 07:53:29 PM EST



[ Parent ]
Three years is a long time (3.00 / 2) (#56)
by jobi on Tue Dec 11, 2007 at 09:44:02 AM EST

In my eyes there's no dispute that K5 is far gone down a long decline. I don't know when I made a comment last, or for that matter when I bothered to log in last.

Three years. Yeah, it might be that long.

Sad, or a natural phase? You tell me (as I'm sure you will). Still, if you ask me, there's not enough good content here anymore to get me involved. The trolls rule the roost - more power to them if they're happy with things the way they are - but for me it was the quality of submissions and discussions that drew me here in the first place and that's sadly lacking nowadays.

Not that I expect anyone to care, just felt like commenting on the fact that there might not have been a notable story on K5 for the last three years or so.

---
"[Y]ou can lecture me on bad language when you learn to use a fucking apostrophe."
[ Parent ]

I always suspected academia was full of shit (2.86 / 15) (#27)
by sllort on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 04:14:17 PM EST

Now I have proof.
--
Warning: On Lawn is a documented liar.
kuro5hin has been cited (2.28 / 7) (#28)
by circletimessquare on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 04:19:28 PM EST

IN YER MOM'S PANTS

PROOF OF TEH INTELLECTUAL ELITEZ

i AM TEH GENIUS TYPE PERSON


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

Wow, I get around (2.50 / 2) (#29)
by localroger on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 04:39:45 PM EST

The Game Studies article also cites my disassembly of Combat which I originally posted to the 2600 mailing list and ended up hosted at AtariAge. And it wasn't even about the Singularity.

alexboko: I think, how do animals view our behavior?
Sgt York: Opening
You're hosted at AtariAge? (none / 0) (#31)
by NoMoreNicksLeft on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 12:58:27 AM EST

Damn. Now it feels dirty, I'll have to stop going there.

--
Do not look directly into laser with remaining good eye.
[ Parent ]
IM IN UR ATARI LIKKEN UR HANDAL $ (none / 1) (#36)
by localroger on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 08:52:11 AM EST



alexboko: I think, how do animals view our behavior?
Sgt York: Opening
[ Parent ]
You will cease licking my anything. (none / 0) (#51)
by NoMoreNicksLeft on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 08:26:19 PM EST

I'm reporting this to rusty, I don't think he approves of this sexual harassment.

--
Do not look directly into laser with remaining good eye.
[ Parent ]
IM IN UR K5 TROLIN UR INSECURETIEZ $ (3.00 / 3) (#52)
by localroger on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 08:37:00 PM EST



alexboko: I think, how do animals view our behavior?
Sgt York: Opening
[ Parent ]
Does this mean (2.66 / 3) (#30)
by fn0rd on Sun Dec 09, 2007 at 10:02:58 PM EST

we can't fuck Natalee anymore?

This fatwa brought to you by the Agnostic Jihad

skull and bones (none / 1) (#41)
by circletimessquare on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 01:42:25 PM EST

the top secret yale society that gw bush was in, apparently has geronimo's skeleton on the premises

i hereby declare that k5 keep natalee's skeleton on the premises. all pledges to the k5 fraternity must skullfuck (literally) natalee holloway before joining (as well as pay $5)


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

K5 is also cited in anm O'Reilly Book (3.00 / 2) (#35)
by wiredog on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 08:27:58 AM EST

Here.

The idea of a global village is wrong, it's more like a gazillion pub bars.
Phage

The California Department of Mental Health (2.85 / 7) (#39)
by MichaelCrawford on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 12:59:19 PM EST

I was told by a county mental health worker that Living with Schizoaffective Disorder, which made front-page at K5 in 2003, is included in a recommended reading list distributed by the state Department of Mental Health.


--
Looking for some free songs?


i always thought (3.00 / 4) (#40)
by circletimessquare on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 01:39:54 PM EST

your description of trying to concentrate on work, while nazi tanks drove around in the parking lot below, was quite a vivid description. would have made a great scene in "a beautiful mind"

ps: what do you think of nokia's attempt at hijacking ogg?


The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses of instruction.

[ Parent ]

Heh, thanks. I don't know what to make of Nokia (none / 1) (#42)
by MichaelCrawford on Mon Dec 10, 2007 at 01:45:21 PM EST

I'll see if it comes up on the ogg-dev list.


--
Looking for some free songs?


[ Parent ]

hmmm (none / 1) (#55)
by United Fools on Tue Dec 11, 2007 at 09:20:15 AM EST

When will our articles here be referenced from a paper on the subject of foolishness and on K5 itself?

We are united, we are fools, and we are America!
Other major cites (none / 1) (#59)
by maroberts on Wed Dec 12, 2007 at 11:07:26 AM EST

I get the impression that ti_dave's article HOWTO: Perform the Dilation & Curettage Surgical Procedure has been widely referenced. I'm trying to find out if an actual medical paper refers to it.

I thought localroger had been widely quoted as a result of his Casino Odyssey articles on gambling. One wonders whether he's been cited in papers.

I've not been cited as a result of a K5 article, only as a result of my Linux DeCSS assist. I'm not sure whether being part of an actual University course counts or not for this.
~~~
The greatest trick the Devil pulled was to convince the world he didn't exist -- Verbil Kint, The Usual Suspects

A million monkeys (none / 0) (#69)
by sudogeek on Sat Dec 29, 2007 at 03:02:29 PM EST

typing on a million keyboards ...

Or, a broken clock is still right twice a day.

In any case, given enough people and submissions, once in a while someone will say something useful. The comments are the real gems, though.

You're an arrogant, condescending, ignorant dipshit. - trhurler

Intellectual + kuro5hin? Ahahahahaha. (none / 1) (#70)
by internetslacker on Sat Jan 05, 2008 at 04:32:16 PM EST

Ahahahaha, I say.

www.internetslacker.com www.internetslacker.net www.internetslacker.org

The intellectual impact of kuro5hin.org | 70 comments (59 topical, 11 editorial, 1 hidden)
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