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Making crude oil from old automobile tires

By Anonymous 242 in MLP
Fri Oct 20, 2000 at 12:07:50 PM EST
Tags: News (all tags)
News

According to this story at allAfrica.com British researches have found a way to turn scrap old automobile tires into crude that is the similiar to "North Sea Brent crude." Needless to say, this could have a profound effect on gas prices should the technology be commercially viable. The company involved, Coalite plans to have commercial production of crude from tires by April 2001.


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How important are alternatives to crude oil?
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Related Links
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Making crude oil from old automobile tires | 6 comments (6 topical, editorial, 0 hidden)
Commercially viable? (3.75 / 4) (#1)
by El Volio on Fri Oct 20, 2000 at 10:54:26 AM EST

As the author and link mention, the key is whether this is commercially viable. It mentions that the factory should be able to produce about 35M L of crude from about 80k tons of tires (sorry, gotta use American spelling in my post! :) ). I'm curious, though: What's the cost of 1k tons of tires? How much is 1M L of crude worth? What are the processing costs right now?

I mean, there's lots of things that can be done to recycle and reduce waste. But until they become economically efficient, thy're not implemented on a large scale.

Old tires. (3.00 / 2) (#3)
by Alarmist on Fri Oct 20, 2000 at 11:12:43 AM EST

As the author and link mention, the key is whether this is commercially viable. It mentions that the factory should be able to produce about 35M L of crude from about 80k tons of tires (sorry, gotta use American spelling in my post! :) ).

According to some slipshod math of mine, 35 million liters of oil comes to about 220,458 (approximately) barrels of oil (one barrel = 42 US gallons or 158.76 liters). You can run through that much oil in less than a day, probably, but the point is that they can get oil from something that would otherwise be going to waste.

Now, what's interesting is the tires themselves. Used tires have a lot of uses, like making pavement, surfaces for playgrounds, shoe treads, and a host of other things. What I thought was funny is that around the time the Firestone tire recall broke, NPR interviewed the head of a used-tire reclaiming company (they're one of the firms that makes old tires into different things) and asked if they were pleased about those 6.5 million tires. As I recall, the president of the company kind of snorted and said that 6.5 million tires was small change compared to what they were used to dealing with.


[ Parent ]

Tires in roads (none / 0) (#4)
by tzanger on Sat Oct 21, 2000 at 08:56:58 AM EST

Now, what's interesting is the tires themselves. Used tires have a lot of uses, like making pavement, surfaces for playgrounds, shoe treads, and a host of other things.

Actually I was onsite at an asphalt plant and the ground-tires-in-asphalt type of asphalt is not very popular. It's difficult to mix and is very expensive because of that. However, the race tracks love the stuff because the properties of the road change as it heats up and any skidmarks will "heal" overnight. Sadly there isn't much demand for it elsewhere though.



[ Parent ]
not economical (none / 0) (#5)
by mikpos on Sat Oct 21, 2000 at 01:50:03 PM EST

Agreed. It would be much more efficient to wait a couple decades until the major oil wells have dried up before we start thinking about these things.

[ Parent ]
The oil market won't notice (4.00 / 5) (#2)
by Paul Johnson on Fri Oct 20, 2000 at 11:12:36 AM EST

Even if this process can convert tyres -> crude for free, it won't make a dent in the International oil market. Think about how many tanks of petrol you burn for every set of tyres.

Paul.
You are lost in a twisty maze of little standards, all different.

Good way to get rid of tyres (none / 0) (#6)
by Dop on Mon Oct 23, 2000 at 11:26:56 AM EST

Tyres are a big problem. They don't rot, and if they catch fire they belch out horrible black putrid smoke, heavily polluting the atmosphere.
Anything that gets rid of them and produces something useful is then a good thing. It'll be interesting to hear how clean the process is.

Do not burn the candle at both ends as this leads to the life of a hairdresser!
Making crude oil from old automobile tires | 6 comments (6 topical, 0 editorial, 0 hidden)
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