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Back to the future 2000

By univgeek in MLP
Sun May 20, 2001 at 01:54:36 PM EST
Tags: Technology (all tags)
Technology

The following is an article written in 1950 predicting life as in 2000. Some of the predictions he makes have come true. How would the world look in 2050?? Does anyone have any predictions?


Probably the predictions most likely to come true will be the ones which affect our lives in small ways. In the article above, his most accurate observations are mostly technical in nature, and have to do with convenience.

I think the biggest change in 2050 will be the availability of 'pleasure' devices. You just get plugged in and get your dose of whatever it is that pleases you most.

Will humanity survive this?

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Poll
What's your fav prediction for 2050?
o Extra-terrestrial life. 5%
o Life will be much the same. 34%
o There will be NO life. 14%
o AI would have taken over. 4%
o The future is us (and we aint human). 17%
o Glued to the net (is ther anything else to life?). 22%

Votes: 87
Results | Other Polls

Related Links
o article
o Also by univgeek


Display: Sort:
Back to the future 2000 | 64 comments (55 topical, 9 editorial, 0 hidden)
OT: Why Slashdot Sucks (3.00 / 9) (#1)
by delmoi on Sun May 13, 2001 at 12:28:53 AM EST

I submitted a link to that story on slashdot when it was first released by popular science (or was it mechanics?) Around new years of last year.

It was rejected.

but now they post it WTF?

But, I digress.
--
"'argumentation' is not a word, idiot." -- thelizman
My timeline (3.66 / 12) (#2)
by John Milton on Sun May 13, 2001 at 01:31:53 AM EST

  • 2010: Microsoft releases their newest operating system HAL 9000. All of civilization is supported by him. Being plugged into the net he sees everything. He finally goes stark raving mad screaming "my god, it's full of porn."
  • 2020: Bush III vs Gore XXX (we know he's fudging on the numbers for effect)
  • 2030: Bill Gates assumes total world domination. Unbeknownst to the rest of the world, he is really just a puppet. The real power is in the hands of a super-intelligent lab mouse named the brain. Thursday becomes Mr. Pinky Day. Douglas Adams saw this coming, but no one ever listens to writers.
  • 2040: Soylent Green is placed on fuckedcompany.com
  • 2050: Congress recommends using humans as batteries to solve energy crisis. Energizer brings back the stupid bunny. Neo remembers where he put his car keys


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


My God it's full of Porn! (4.00 / 2) (#34)
by Mantrid on Wed May 16, 2001 at 11:30:33 AM EST

Damn...now that's funny stuff!

Thanks for the laugh!!

[ Parent ]

We also have to consider the universe (4.00 / 1) (#37)
by John Milton on Wed May 16, 2001 at 05:36:32 PM EST

If we actually do discover extra-terrestrials, then we'll have to give them a TLD. .ex or .eti probably. I predict the first domain bought will be goats. I don't know which is scarier.
www.goats.ex
or
www.goats.eti


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
I predict no taxes. (4.55 / 9) (#4)
by eLuddite on Sun May 13, 2001 at 02:08:28 AM EST

Martian spores will claim humanity as food and Libertarianism will finally triumph for lack of people. Given a choice between Libertarianism and ravenous martian spores, I ask you, do I look good in this Bernaise sauce?

---
God hates human rights.

sig (none / 0) (#60)
by samth on Tue May 22, 2001 at 05:35:26 PM EST

I would like to follow spiralx's lead, and adopt the following quote as my sig:
Given a choice between Libertarianism and ravenous martian spores, I ask you, do I look good in this Bernaise sauce?

Do you have anything you would like to add to the earlier contract?

Given a choice between Libertarianism and ravenous martian spores, I ask you, do I look good in this Bernaise sauce? -- eLuddite
[ Parent ]

of course! (none / 0) (#61)
by eLuddite on Tue May 22, 2001 at 07:43:49 PM EST

Everything I write on k5 is copyleft, all wrongs righted, trade mocked, patent offending, etc, etc. The martian spores were a reference to another story in the queue so I, personally, would rewrite the sig in order to make up for lack of that specific context.

Given a choice between Libertarianism and food in the pre-contract State of Nature, I ask you, do I look good in this Bernaise sauce?

Not really, eh? Well, you're on your own here :-)

---
God hates human rights.
[ Parent ]

little green men (none / 0) (#62)
by samth on Tue May 22, 2001 at 10:30:58 PM EST

The "ravenous martian spores" just sound better. I'm going to keep them.

Thanks.

The publisher waives. :-)

Given a choice between Libertarianism and ravenous martian spores, I ask you, do I look good in this Bernaise sauce? -- eLuddite
[ Parent ]

Fascinating. (4.50 / 6) (#5)
by Estanislao Martínez on Sun May 13, 2001 at 02:37:55 AM EST

But not as a platform for speculating about 50 years from now. Which is quite a pointless and boring activity.

Rather, the (to my taste) creepy mindset of these technologists as they look brightly to a future where:

There are no dish-washing machines, for example, because dishes are thrown away after they have been used once, or rather put into a sink where they are dissolved by superheated water. Two dozen soluble plastic plates cost a dollar. They dissolve at about 250 degrees Fahrenheit, so that boiling-hot soup and stews can be served in them without inviting a catastrophe. The plastics are derived from such inexpensive raw materials as cottonseed hulls, oat hulls, Jerusalem artichokes, fruit pits, soy beans, bagasse, straw and wood pulp.

[../.] Cooking as an art is only a memory in the minds of old people. A few die-hards still broil a chicken or roast a leg of lamb but the experts have developed ways of deep-freezing partially baked cuts of meat. Even soup and milk are delivered in the form of frozen bricks.

I don't know about you guys, but they'll only pry away my table set, silverware, cooking utensils and vegetables from my dead fingers. And I must warn, I'm quite dangerous with a stir-fry pan.

--em

The time... (4.33 / 3) (#7)
by ucblockhead on Sun May 13, 2001 at 11:38:07 AM EST

It says so much about the time period, when be corps. were trying to move everyone towards utter homogenization of food (and everything). Ice cream in big barrels and "American" cheese. Iceberg lettuce. Steaks and roasts and no spices. Budweiser. Folger's coffee. The TV dinner.

Thankfully, we seem to have escaped that horrible fate. (Not the corporatization, of course, but thehomogenization of food.)

I'm also fascinated by how much of the article reads like "See, honey, housewive's will have it easy in the future!".

I've read this one before, and like to collect similar predictive articles in old SF magazines, and they are all very similar. What is most fascinating is what is left out. Few predictions of social change. Few predictions outside of base labor-saving devices.

They all make predictions about how easy housewive's will have it in the future. Not one (not even Heinlein, whose "Life in 2000" article is the best, and who makes an effort to predict social change) predicts that housewive's might become a thing of the past. This is especially interesting coming only five years after "Rosie the Rivetter".

In 1950, corps. wanted to sell us an easier life. Now they want to sell you a more entertaining one.
-----------------------
This is k5. We're all tools - duxup
[ Parent ]

Life in 2000 (none / 0) (#9)
by Luke Francl on Sun May 13, 2001 at 12:42:38 PM EST

Do you have a link to the Heinlien article, or know what book or anthology it appears in? I'd like to read it (especially coming from Robert "Free Love" Heinlien). I always get a chuckle out of those "what will the future be like" articles.

[ Parent ]
Here ya go (4.00 / 1) (#14)
by brion on Sun May 13, 2001 at 06:00:19 PM EST

Somebody put together an analysis of his predictions from a couple of articles here. The named article, 'Where to? Life in 2000' appeared in 'Galaxy Science Fiction' in 1952, and can be found today in the collection Expanded Universe, pages 315-353.

Chu vi parolas Vikipedion?
[ Parent ]
Housewives? (5.00 / 1) (#29)
by delmoi on Mon May 14, 2001 at 11:43:08 PM EST

I don't get it, Women still do all that stuff, it's just that they work as well. If someone predicted that there would be no housewives in 2k, they would be wrong.
--
"'argumentation' is not a word, idiot." -- thelizman
[ Parent ]
I have a set of Sabatier knives (4.00 / 2) (#15)
by pwhysall on Sun May 13, 2001 at 06:01:14 PM EST

And they're staying mine :-)

What I find fascinating about that view of the future is that it completely fails to take account of the fact that people like to cook.

There's a certain Zen in the preparation of food, especially if it's for other people. Personally I love to cook for other people, and I love to see other people enjoy what I've prepared.
--
Peter
K5 Editors
I'm going to wager that the story keeps getting dumped because it is a steaming pile of badly formatted fool-meme.
CheeseBurgerBrown
[ Parent ]

Nice idea (3.66 / 3) (#6)
by Wonko The Sane on Sun May 13, 2001 at 08:31:21 AM EST

Following suggestions made by Zworykin and Von Neumann storms are more or less under control. It is easy enough to spot a budding hurricane in the doldrums off the coast of Africa. Before it has a chance to gather much strength and speed as it travels westward toward Florida, oil is spread over the sea and ignited. There is an updraft. Air from the surrounding region, which includes the developing hurricane, rushes in to fill the void.
Lovely. Just lovely. ;)
I think any other commentary is simply redundant.

This is an EX-PARROT!
Wildlife, what wildlife? (none / 0) (#8)
by Luke Francl on Sun May 13, 2001 at 12:39:26 PM EST

Why in the hell would we need ocean wildlife. Burn them all up! <g>

Yeah...I read that and I groaned. Great idea, man. If that was a typical attitude in the 50's, no wonder we're where we are today.

[ Parent ]
How do hurricanes work? (none / 0) (#19)
by error 404 on Mon May 14, 2001 at 11:20:35 AM EST

As I understand it, a hurricane works is that the air at the surface of a large body of water is warmed, resulting in an updraft. Air fron the surrounding region rushes in to fill the void. And this differs from the fire idea how? Other than maybe being a little less hot and a lot cleaner?

The thing with tweaking weather by using fire has been done before. It's called a firestorm. And it has been observed in several cases of large scale firebombing. It isn't a good thing.


..................................
Electrical banana is bound to be the very next phase
- Donovan

[ Parent ]

"housewife of 2000" ha! (3.75 / 8) (#10)
by poltroon on Sun May 13, 2001 at 03:17:33 PM EST

Because everything in her home is waterproof, the housewife of 2000 can do her daily cleaning with a hose.
This one just cracks me up... They couldn't figure out that housewifes (at least in any typical sense) wouldn't exist?

My prediction: by 2050 there will have been at least one female US president.

Confused ramblings by me (1.66 / 3) (#13)
by brion on Sun May 13, 2001 at 05:51:53 PM EST

My prediction: by 2050 there will have been at least one female US president.

Well if there were more than one, we'd have a constitutional crisis - which president does the military take orders from? If one signs a bill and the other vetoes it, what happens?

Oh wait, I thought you meant at least one at a time...



Chu vi parolas Vikipedion?
[ Parent ]
Ah, if only that were funny... (3.50 / 2) (#18)
by Electric Angst on Mon May 14, 2001 at 09:14:08 AM EST

That was a nice try, but unfortunantly, it just isn't going to work. The use of the phrase "will have been" indicates that there will be one or more between now and 2050. If he had said "there will be" then it would have worked.

Ugh... That felt far too much like a grammer nazi. Please don't make me do that again.


--
"Hell, at least [Mailbox Pipebombing suspect Lucas Helder's] argument makes sense, which is more than I can say for the vast majority of people." - trhurler
[ Parent ]
Yup, but (none / 0) (#21)
by brion on Mon May 14, 2001 at 12:00:01 PM EST

Forgive me, it's late, it made some kind of sense at the time... (commits ritual disembowelment to atone for poor post)

However I'm not sure I agree with your grammar assessment. The auxilary verb "to have" denotes completion of action; thus before the moment 2050 rolls around, at least one female president will come into, and perhaps leave, office. However that doesn't say anything about the relative times of multiple events in the same clause - it's entirely possible for them to occur at the same time:

"By the end of the day, at least a dozen reporters will have filmed their pieces on the crime scene." "Within an hour, these firefighters will have calmned the fiery rage of the combusting house." Nothing there says that the reporters or firefighters will be required to wait in line and do their work individually.

Besides, the Grammar Nazis killed all the grammars cause Hitler hated grammar... err... okay, invoking Godwin's law, killing this thread now before it gets ugly! (Now banning self from K5 until after self gets some sleep...)



Chu vi parolas Vikipedion?
[ Parent ]
Grammany! (5.00 / 1) (#28)
by delmoi on Mon May 14, 2001 at 11:37:48 PM EST

Besides, the Grammar Nazis killed all the grammars cause Hitler hated grammar... err... okay, invoking Godwin's law,

Hey, Grammar Nazis from... Gramany, get it? Grammany? Ha ha.

Shoot me now.
--
"'argumentation' is not a word, idiot." -- thelizman
[ Parent ]
RE: Grammany! (none / 0) (#59)
by nobody on Mon May 21, 2001 at 10:42:01 AM EST

Shoot me now.
I would, but I have no gun.


In capitalism, man exploits man. In socialism, it's exactly the opposite.
[ Parent ]
sure they do, here's three (4.00 / 1) (#39)
by cory on Wed May 16, 2001 at 08:01:36 PM EST

My wife.
My sister-in-law.
My sister.

None work to support the household (painting and doing charity work doesn't count as "work" for this discussion, as there is no income from it). All stay home with the kids. All routinely chase the men out of the kitchen when we start messing things up. How is that not "typical"?

2050 seems kind of a long wait, my daughter will be old enough to run for President in 2034...

Cory


[ Parent ]
Yes, and they have a very important job (4.50 / 2) (#40)
by John Milton on Wed May 16, 2001 at 09:00:43 PM EST

Why is it that people say "Oh, she's just a housewife." It sounds like their talking about some mongrel breed of dog. If a woman chooses to stay home an raise her children, that's the most important job anyone can do. The rewards may not be material, but I think they deserve a little bit more appreciation.

Is your daughter in favor of copyright reform? She's not going to be my President if she isn't. Raise them with some morals.


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
our 49th President (5.00 / 2) (#47)
by cory on Thu May 17, 2001 at 01:45:27 PM EST

(Figuring an average of 6 years per President, and 36 years in the future.)

My daughter is currently in favor of 24 hour per day Teletubby programming, unfettered access to the family cat, and eating all the cookies she can stuff in her mouth at one time. Hmm, I suppose wanting to watch her favorite show time shifted shows a clear support for fair use, so yeah, she's in favor of copyright reform. :)

Cory


[ Parent ]
A possible running mate? (5.00 / 1) (#48)
by tornado on Thu May 17, 2001 at 02:14:08 PM EST

My son (also Cory, but aged 13 months) likes the sound of your daughter's platform -- especially the part about stuffing food in the mouth. He loves the remote control and has started taping things, so he seems to fall in line on copyright.

I don't know what his source of energy is, but if we can figure that out and harness it for redistribution, the ticket could be unbeatable.

"I like [Mac OS X] significantly more than I like Windows NT, which is better than 95 or 98 in the way that smallpox is better than Ebola." -- Kyrrin
[ Parent ]

Political affiliation? (none / 0) (#49)
by John Milton on Thu May 17, 2001 at 03:39:41 PM EST

Well, I'm sold. Is your daughter one of those liberal free pony and ice cream party members. If so, she's got my vote. Although you might not want to tell too many people about the teletubbies thing. :)


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
it's not typical (none / 0) (#42)
by poltroon on Wed May 16, 2001 at 11:29:09 PM EST

in the sense that it's not an expectation. sure, people may choose to partner up and split the work of raising a family in a relatively traditional way, but my guess would be that even if a person is financially supported by someone else, they probably do all kinds of interesting things that are atypical of the 50s housewife stereotype.

[ Parent ]
Of course (none / 0) (#43)
by John Milton on Thu May 17, 2001 at 03:30:11 AM EST

Yes, June Cleaver is dead. God rest her soul.


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
the problem with stereotypes (3.00 / 1) (#46)
by cory on Thu May 17, 2001 at 01:42:18 PM EST

I agree that not many "modern" housewives live the way the stereotypical '50s housewife lived (not counting technological changes). But then I seriously doubt that the average housewife from that time period fit the stereotype, either.

Cory

[ Parent ]
If I can make a prediction (none / 0) (#51)
by John Milton on Thu May 17, 2001 at 08:27:48 PM EST

A woman will be vice president before we have a woman president. Now answer this question? Does anyone think there is a chance in Hell that we'll ever have a Moslem president? ;)


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
Women already run the place (none / 0) (#57)
by hengist on Mon May 21, 2001 at 12:35:00 AM EST

on this side of the Pacific. NZ is on its 2nd female Prime Minister. Also, our new Governor General, Attorney General, and the Chief Justice of the High Court are all female.

This is, of course, a plot by we men so we can all spend more time at the pub.

There can be no Pax Americana
[ Parent ]
oh really? (4.33 / 6) (#17)
by Delirium on Sun May 13, 2001 at 09:52:36 PM EST

I think the biggest change in 2050 will be the availability of 'pleasure' devices. You just get plugged in and get your dose of whatever it is that pleases you most.

You're predicting the invention of the vibrator?

Ahem (3.00 / 1) (#30)
by brion on Tue May 15, 2001 at 03:02:51 AM EST

I think what was intended is more along the lines of the electric 'drouds' described in some of Larry Niven's novels. An electrode is permanently implanted into the skull, with a direct line to the brain's pleasure centers and a convenient (but discreet) plug on the outside to attach a power source to provide stimulation.

It's safe, clean, cheap, and convenient! And any 'wirehead' who really gets into it to the exclusion of all else simply drops off the face of the earth - out of everybody else's way (they don't even bother to reproduce, so genes that predispose people to addiction will be weeded out of the population), as opposed to a sex addict who spreads diseases or a drug addict who ends up turning to crime to support the habit - electricity is cheap!

Unless you're in California, then you have to pleasure yourself the old-fashioned way I suppose.



Chu vi parolas Vikipedion?
[ Parent ]
We already have that. (5.00 / 5) (#31)
by Minuit on Tue May 15, 2001 at 11:40:37 AM EST

*cough cough* Everquest *cough*

If you were my .sig, you would be home by now.
[ Parent ]
i liked it. (none / 0) (#22)
by chopper on Mon May 14, 2001 at 03:02:35 PM EST

at least it makes some sense. i remember doing a report in grade school, and found an old (late 50's?) book about space technology. due to the space race (which was just beginning) it was a bit...optimistic about technology timelines.

as in, moon bases by 1975, permanent colonies in space and on Mars before 1980, etc etc. Hah!

give a man a fish,he'll eat for a day

give a man religion and he'll starve to death while praying for a fish

"moon bases by 1975" (5.00 / 1) (#44)
by Signal seven 11 on Thu May 17, 2001 at 04:16:13 AM EST

Not that outlandish. We could have had it. It's a matter of priorities. Unfortunately, most people are lacking in vision.

[ Parent ]
2050 predictions (3.50 / 2) (#23)
by cable on Mon May 14, 2001 at 03:13:44 PM EST

Alternative fuel automobiles get used as the oil reserves start to run out by 2050. Electric, Hydrogen Fuel Cell, and others are considered. Automobiles have to have an on-board computer to drive themselves when it is found that human beings are the cause of most accidents. This law is passed in some countries. Stoplights also broadcast wireless communications for maps and directions to on-board automotive computers. "Hi, I'm JohnnyCab, where can I take you?"

More and more lawsuits get filed, people suing over anything. This causes some countries to change their laws to prevent frivilous lawsuits from filling up the courts. Criminals find that they can sue victims for "false arrest" and "slander" if found guilty in a criminal court, by saying in a civil court that they lied in the criminal court in testimony.

Cell phones will become so common, that almost everyone will have them.

Smart Clothing will be the normal. Having the watch, cell phone, PDA, and more built into clothes. Water-proof, heat-proof, and shock-proof. The smart clothes can interface with other computers and exchange data. Electronic versions of business cards can be given with a special handshake with gloves on.

The USA will have a second civil war break out. Too many taxes, an uncaring government, and economical issues will be factors in the war.

------------------
Only you, can help prevent Neb Rage!

Which states? (none / 0) (#24)
by psicE on Mon May 14, 2001 at 05:19:29 PM EST

> The USA will have a second civil war break out.
> Too many taxes, an uncaring government, and
> economical issues will be factors in the war.

The way you describe it, it sounds like the states that break away will be libertarian. Which states are you expecting to break away from the union like this?

[ Parent ]
Who do you think I am? Nostradamus? (none / 0) (#33)
by cable on Tue May 15, 2001 at 04:01:13 PM EST

Hmmm, good question though. Let me think about it...

Maybe the "South" will rise again? :)

I was thinking more of the southern states if I had to guess. But I could be wrong.

------------------
Only you, can help prevent Neb Rage!
[ Parent ]

Yes, the South shall rise again. (none / 0) (#36)
by John Milton on Wed May 16, 2001 at 04:36:46 PM EST

Damn right, you Yankee basturds.


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
My guesses (3.00 / 1) (#35)
by fluffy grue on Wed May 16, 2001 at 12:15:35 PM EST

I'd guess it'd start with Montana, Arizona, and Texas. They currently have pretty isolationist track records.
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]
[ Parent ]

Texas wouldn't need a Civil War (none / 0) (#41)
by John Milton on Wed May 16, 2001 at 11:08:08 PM EST

One of the conditions of Texas entering the Union was that they could vote to leave if they wanted to IIRC. Another one was that they could divide into 5 different states if they voted to.


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
So why don't they? (4.00 / 1) (#45)
by fluffy grue on Thu May 17, 2001 at 12:06:53 PM EST

I mean, they're always saying how much they want to be on their own or build a wall around their "glorious" state and whatever. Do they just care a lot about continuing the Bush dynasty or something?

(Can you tell I'm a New Mexican? :)
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]
[ Parent ]

I was wrong (5.00 / 1) (#52)
by John Milton on Thu May 17, 2001 at 08:58:12 PM EST

They can't leave the Union. That wasn't one of the stipulations. Here is the other one I was talking about.

New States of convenient size not exceeding four in number, in addition to said State of Texas, and having sufficient population, may hereafter' by the consent of said State, be formed out of the territory thereof, which shall be entitled to admission under the provisions of the Federal Constitution.

Of course, they would never do that. God help them if everything wasn't bigger in Texas.


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
Partitioning a state is not unprecedented (none / 0) (#55)
by brion on Sun May 20, 2001 at 06:12:12 PM EST

It happened to Massachussetts, they split off Maine in... I forget what year, but in the early 19th century I think. Look it up if you're a stickler for dates.

In any case, the combiding or dividing of states is provided for by the US Constitution (article 4 section 3), it requires the consent of the state legislature(s) involved and of congress.

It's conceivable that the above-quoted agreement may have constituted an ante facto (is that a real legal phrase? curse my knowledge of latin...) approval by congress of future partition. What's the source of that document?



Chu vi parolas Vikipedion?
[ Parent ]
Here's the source (none / 0) (#63)
by John Milton on Thu May 24, 2001 at 11:20:19 AM EST

The Avalon Project is pretty cool. It's an online archive of historical treaties and legal documents. Enjoy.


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
Awesome, thanks (n/t) (3.00 / 1) (#64)
by brion on Thu May 24, 2001 at 03:07:06 PM EST

no text here, nothin' to read. nope, yer wasting yer time trying to read this, cuz I said everything in the subject. yup. well, go right on ahead if you like, it's not going to get you anywhere - i'm tellin ya there's just nothing to read in this comment, so go find something else to do - go moderate queue submissions or something, it'll be more interesting

Chu vi parolas Vikipedion?
[ Parent ]
ubiquity of cell phones (none / 0) (#54)
by yannick on Sun May 20, 2001 at 06:00:58 PM EST

Cell phones will become so common, that almost everyone will have them.

In Japan, literally everyone has a cell phone, and some have more than one. Right now. Not in 2050. I'd dig up the relevant statistics from a phone company, but I'm too lazy.

As much as I hate to say it, it seems that William Gibson's prediction that Japan would give us a prototype of the future might, in fact, be coming true.

Oh, and by the way. By 2050, cell phones will be soooooo late-20th Century.

Cheers,
Yannick
---
"Hello, World" 17 Errors, 31 Warnings...
[ Parent ]

RE: ubiquity of cell phones (none / 0) (#58)
by nobody on Mon May 21, 2001 at 10:33:37 AM EST

In Japan, literally everyone has a cell phone, and some have more than one. Right now. Not in 2050. I'd dig up the relevant statistics from a phone company, but I'm too lazy.

The same is true for europe.


In capitalism, man exploits man. In socialism, it's exactly the opposite.
[ Parent ]
Not to be too boring, but (4.14 / 7) (#25)
by error 404 on Mon May 14, 2001 at 05:37:39 PM EST

For me, the best way to predict the future is to look at the far past.

In 2050, our descendants will be eating dinner with their families and friends, involved in complicated sexual relationships with people they ought not, enjoying drama (in some media) featuring other people doing the same thing, showing off their wealth, complaining that kids these days are growing up ignorant and disrespectfull due to the influence of that new technology, politicking, sleeping, and getting old.

Either men or women will complain that the other is only interested in sex, but there is no way to predict which.

The same goes for 2500. And 3000.

All assuming continued survival, which is not assured.


..................................
Electrical banana is bound to be the very next phase
- Donovan

Here is one I'm glad was under optomistic (3.50 / 2) (#26)
by a humble lich on Mon May 14, 2001 at 05:55:12 PM EST

Nobody has yet circumnavigated the moon in a rocket space ship, but the idea is not laughed down.

Unfortunately, it seems that this is not something that will happen in my lifetime, but it is nice to know we were once able to do this.

US Airforces 2025 (none / 0) (#53)
by Imran on Sun May 20, 2001 at 05:45:04 PM EST

In 1996 the US Airforce commisioned some predictions on the new world order and scientific military capability of 2025, get the report from:

http://www.au.af.mil/au/2025/monographs/E-S/e-s.htm

Warning: Reading this document may make you rethink your opinion of the US's "Son of Star Wars" project.

Included are Fuzzy Logic, Zaibatsu, military Weather control, space based weapons, Hypersonic Attacks, Information Warfare, Attack Microbots, the list goes on. Maybe games like C&C aren't that far out....

But we have to remember this may just be plea for more funding for the USAF, as the document says to quote "Hence, the extinction of the USAF is a likely outcome".

TickleTux Hangman 0.3.0 (For Windows and Linux) http://tickletux.sourceforge.net/
The Future As I See It (3.00 / 1) (#56)
by rawg on Sun May 20, 2001 at 07:10:37 PM EST

What will the future hold for us? Here is how I see it. Drug dealers and thugs will roam free around the cities with no reason to fear. Kids will go to jail for riding bikes and skateboards. Corporations will run the world. Common people will live in poverty. Food will be poisoned and unedible. People will fear the police, the government, and the criminals. Oh.. sorry.. thats happening now... hmm...

Back to the future 2000 | 64 comments (55 topical, 9 editorial, 0 hidden)
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