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Netpliance changes the rules

By The-Dev in News
Fri Mar 24, 2000 at 12:40:15 PM EST
Tags: Hardware (all tags)
Hardware

Netpliance has updated their website with the following text:

By purchasing the i-opener you are agreeing to use the i-opener Internet service. The fee is $21.95 a month and will be billed approximately 2 days after the i-opener is shipped to you.

i-opener Internet appliances shipped after March 20, 2000 can no longer be reconfigured in the manner described in recent reports. Modification of the i-opener in any way is in violation of our terms and conditions.


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Netpliance changes the rules | 12 comments (12 topical, editorial, 0 hidden)
Does this mean you can hack it if y... (none / 0) (#8)
by nascent on Wed Mar 22, 2000 at 11:44:01 PM EST

nascent voted 1 on this story.

Does this mean you can hack it if you'd like but are bound with the internet service, or that they've changed the unit in some way that makes it unhackable? I'm quite sure that someone will quash that in a day, they can't do anything drastic w/out causing themselves some serious revenue loss (retooling and retrofitting, etc.)
nascent
http://www.intap.net/~j/

Hmmm. Bummer. And for a while it lo... (4.00 / 1) (#1)
by rusty on Wed Mar 22, 2000 at 11:58:48 PM EST

rusty voted 1 on this story.

Hmmm. Bummer. And for a while it looked like they were gonna be all cool about it. Looks like things blew up in their faces a little too much. Here's my take on this move:

  • They'd go broke selling these things at 99 bucks to people who never intended to pay for the dialup service. The machines cost $400 to make, so they lose $300 on every box they sell. Even if their ISP cost was nil, they have to sell 15 months of service to each and every subscriber just to break even. That's a fact of life they have to face.
  • They did acknowlege that they were impressed and enlightened by the hack, which leads me to believe that they might try to market an "upgraded" version, with a little hard drive and (please, oh please!) an ethernet port, for maybe $500 (maybe a little lower). That would actually be cool. I don't know how well it'd sell, but I'd advise netpliance to give it a shot.


____
Not the real rusty
While interesting at first, the i-o... (none / 0) (#10)
by tsunake on Thu Mar 23, 2000 at 12:40:19 AM EST

tsunake voted -1 on this story.

While interesting at first, the i-opener hack has lost its appeal. Besides, I don't condone ripping off a loss leader anyways... Netpliance is certainly within their rights to put such a restriction on the service, making a discussion on this topic pointless if not impossible. Also a tad bit USA-centric.

Ha, like they can actually ENFORCE ... (none / 0) (#6)
by fluffy grue on Thu Mar 23, 2000 at 01:52:00 AM EST

fluffy grue voted 1 on this story.

Ha, like they can actually ENFORCE that. Well, so much for them not wanting to upset the free software community, which was the only people who were likely to buy a netpliance just to modify...

BTW, consider putting a topic on this story. :)
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]

That sucks. It figures, though....... (none / 0) (#7)
by locutus074 on Thu Mar 23, 2000 at 06:45:22 AM EST

locutus074 voted 1 on this story.

That sucks. It figures, though.... watch their sales drop like a rock. :)
--
"If you haven't gotten where you're going,
you aren't there yet." --George Carlin

Gits. No sense of adventure. Bet th... (none / 0) (#2)
by hattig on Thu Mar 23, 2000 at 06:59:51 AM EST

hattig voted 1 on this story.

Gits. No sense of adventure. Bet they have just taken the IDE port off the motherboard! Just solder one on and off you go again!

Of course they were silly not to have the internet usage clause on their website before, dimwits!

... (none / 0) (#9)
by marlowe on Thu Mar 23, 2000 at 10:40:46 AM EST

marlowe voted 1 on this story.

--- I will insist on my right to question ---
-- The Americans are the Jews of the 21st century. Only we won't go as quietly to the gas chambers. --

hmmmm... it doesn't say how long I ... (none / 0) (#5)
by Emacs on Thu Mar 23, 2000 at 02:43:40 PM EST

Emacs voted 1 on this story.

hmmmm... it doesn't say how long I have to use the service. I could always change my mind and cancel. Also, if I BUY the device then I can do whatever I damn well please with it. If I want to open it up and hack it I will. sheesh.

Huh? I thought that they were acce... (none / 0) (#3)
by bmetzler on Thu Mar 23, 2000 at 02:45:05 PM EST

bmetzler voted 1 on this story.

Huh? I thought that they were accepting the Linux hacks as being okay. That they were going to work with the Open Source community. Now certainly, modifications violate the warrenty. No one expects them to replace modified fried equipment. And requiring you to purchase a internet service contract is certainly understandable, and probably should have been done right away. But to make modifications a violation of their terms and conditions? What are they going to do if you modify it? Fine you? -Brent
www.bmetzler.org - it's not just a personal weblog, it's so much more.

Bwuahhaa.. Company decides to make... (none / 0) (#4)
by Inoshiro on Thu Mar 23, 2000 at 04:15:23 PM EST

Inoshiro voted 1 on this story.

Bwuahhaa.. Company decides to make money by selling cheap machines with the service being the cost factor (kinda like eMachines). Then smart people (being smart) figure out that if you put tab A into slot Q, the machine works like any other (slow) machine, but for less of a price.

So the company resorts to a bundle agreement.

Yet we all know such agreements do not hold up in court. My thoughts? Buy one, but register with false info if required. Do what you have to to avoid their pathetic sales gimmic. And enjoy :-)



--
[ イノシロ ]
Is this valid in all states? (none / 0) (#11)
by joeyo on Fri Mar 24, 2000 at 12:49:45 PM EST

I vaguely remember reading that in some states (USA) these ISP/computer bundles and "rebates" are inllegal. Maybe you can still get away with the hack if you are in one of those lucky states....

/joeyo

--
"Give me enough variables to work with, and I can probably do away with the notion of human free will." -- demi

Re: Is this valid in all states? (none / 0) (#12)
by asad on Fri Mar 24, 2000 at 05:09:11 PM EST

you're probably thinking of the microsoft rebate in CA. I was actually in one of the stores that had the rebate and it was a mob scene. Ever since then everyone has changed their agreements to be enforcable, don't ask me how, I don't even play a lawyer on tv.

[ Parent ]
Netpliance changes the rules | 12 comments (12 topical, 0 editorial, 0 hidden)
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