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[P]
An HTML primer for posting on weblogs (fixed!)

By FlinkDelDinky in News
Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 11:12:54 AM EST
Tags: Scoop (all tags)
Scoop

This is a short introduction on how to use those Allowed HTML codes for posting articles to the various weblogs out there. I didn't know what the tags did so I fired up google and searched for answers so you wouldn't have to.

[editor's note, by rusty] The formatting issues on the first version of this were entirely the fault of my broken character entity handling. Sorry about that.


What the tags do:

  1. <p> = paragraph

    Example:
    This is paragraph 1.<p>This is paragraph 2.<p>

    Results in:
    This is paragraph 1.

    This is paragraph 2.

  2. <br> = line break

    Example:
    This is line break 1.<br>This is a paragraph.<p>

    Results in:
    This is line break 1.
    This is a paragraph.

  3. <b> = bold

    Example:
    <b>Bold on</b> turns bold off

    Results in:
    Bold on turns bold off

  4. <i> italics

    Example:
    <i>Italics on</i> turns italics off

    Results in:
    Italics on turns italics off

  5. <em> = emphasize

    Example:
    <em>Ephasize on</em> turns emphasize off.

    Results in:
    Ephasize on turns emphasize off.

  6. <Strong> = strong emphasis

    Example:
    <Strong>Strong on</Strong> turns strong off.

    Results in:
    Strong on turns strong off.

  7. <tt> = teletype. Supposed to be a monospaced font

    Example:
    <tt>Teletype on</tt> turns teletype off.

    Results in:
    Teletype on turns teletype off.

  8. <blockquote> = blockquote. Used for quoting a large segment of text.

    Example:
    This text is regular text<blockquote>But now I'm going to blockquote this large chunk of text so that you can see what happens with blockquoting. You probably won't use it much. Then again this is my first real html document and I'm already using it. Go figure.</blockquote>

    Results in:
    This text is regular text

    But now I'm going to blockquote this large chunk of text so that you can see what happens with blockquoting. You probably won't use it much. Then again this is my first real html document and I'm already using it. Go figure.
  9. <ul>, <ol>, and <li> = unordered lists, ordered list, and list items.

    Example of unordered list:
    <ul>
    <li>a list item</li>
    <li>another list item</li>
    <li>and another list item</li>
    </ul>

    Results in:

    • a list item
    • another list item
    • and another list item

    Example of ordered list:
    <ol>
    <li>a list item</li>
    <li>another list item</li>
    <li>and another list item</li>
    </ol>

    Results in:

    1. a list item
    2. another list item
    3. and another list item

  10. <a> = anchor. It's used for making links to other web pages.

    Example:
    A good place to go <a HREF="http://www.htmlhelp.com/"> for html help</a> or Rusty's <a HREF="http://www.blooberry.com/indexdot/html/"> favorite</a> place.

    Results in:
    A good place to go for html help or Rusty's favorite place.

Sponsors

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Related Links
o Google
o google
o &lt;p&gt;
o Example:
o &lt;br&gt;
o Example: [2]
o &lt;b&gt;
o Example: [3]
o &lt;i&gt;
o Example: [4]
o &lt;em&gt;
o Example: [5]
o &lt;Strong &gt;
o Example: [6]
o &lt;tt&gt;
o Example: [7]
o &lt;blockq uote&gt;
o Example: [8]
o &lt;ul&gt;
o &lt;ol&gt;
o &lt;li&gt;
o list items.
o Example of unordered list:
o Example of ordered list:
o &lt;a&gt;
o Example: [9]
o for html help
o favorite
o Also by FlinkDelDinky


Display: Sort:
An HTML primer for posting on weblogs (fixed!) | 47 comments (47 topical, editorial, 0 hidden)
This is a complete waste of time. A... (2.00 / 1) (#10)
by Raymond on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 09:38:18 AM EST

Raymond voted -1 on this story.

This is a complete waste of time. Anyone with a little knowledge of HTML can figure this out themselves...
----- Someone you trust is one of us...

yikes (none / 0) (#14)
by evro on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 11:14:47 AM EST

I think this was meant for people who don't know HTML.
---
"Asking me who to follow -- don't ask me, I don't know!"
[ Parent ]
Re: yikes (none / 0) (#18)
by rusty on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 12:31:57 PM EST

Indeed it was. Knowing just a little html makes posting comments on k5, and a lot of other sites, much easier. And yes, this will be linked from the "Allowed tags" list.

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
This shouldn't be a story, but perh... (5.00 / 2) (#1)
by bmetzler on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 10:09:53 AM EST

bmetzler voted -1 on this story.

This shouldn't be a story, but perhaps could be a help page linked from the 'submit story' page.
www.bmetzler.org - it's not just a personal weblog, it's so much more.

Thank you very much. I'll be frank;... (3.00 / 1) (#11)
by psicE on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 10:29:30 AM EST

psicE voted 1 on this story.

Thank you very much. I'll be frank; I knew a lot of HTML, but that's just because I'm a techie. Not all K5 readers are computer wizards, unlike /. readers, so this really helps. You might be a teacher someday, if you aren't now, or some counseling field... You'd be good at it.

Re: Thank you very much. I'll be frank;... (none / 0) (#17)
by FlinkDelDinky on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 12:28:59 PM EST

Hey thanks!

I'm a poor learner, so I like to present things as clearly and simply as the subject allows. I just wanted what would've solved my ignorance of posting html formatted articles on Kuro5hin. Nothing less, nothing more.



[ Parent ]

Re: Thank you very much. I'll be frank;... (none / 0) (#41)
by Louis_Wu on Fri Apr 14, 2000 at 06:46:54 PM EST

I couldn't tell if you were being sarcastic about Slashdot's readership being all computer wizards, but I for one am not. The only reason I know any HTML is a Slashdot poster who has this web page in his sig, urging people to learn super-basic HTML. And I agree, Rusty is a decent teacher.

Louis Wu



Louis_Wu
"The power to tax is the power to destroy."
John Marshal, first Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court
[ Parent ]

Re: Thank you very much. I'll be frank;... (none / 0) (#42)
by rusty on Fri Apr 14, 2000 at 07:52:51 PM EST

And I agree, Rusty is a decent teacher.

Yipes! Credit where credit is due-- I didn't write any of that. In fact, I've been feeling guilty about not having written it ever since Flink first requested it. I'm actually not a very good teacher. :-)

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]

Cool. I've actually been looking fo... (3.00 / 1) (#5)
by raph on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 10:36:27 AM EST

raph voted 1 on this story.

Cool. I've actually been looking for something like this. Is there any chance I'd be able to adapt it as part of a helpfile of another site?

Re: Cool. I've actually been looking fo... (none / 0) (#15)
by evro on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 11:16:14 AM EST

you'd have to contact Edna Graustein (or whatever her name is) of Kansas City, Mo.
---
"Asking me who to follow -- don't ask me, I don't know!"
[ Parent ]
Re: Cool. I've actually been looking fo... (none / 0) (#16)
by FlinkDelDinky on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 12:23:24 PM EST

Yes, I wrote the article in gvim so I've got a text file of the article (but not the blurb or title). Rusty also may have the text file (I sent it to him).

Of course it's written in weblog html and not real html (which I don't know and still don't care about).

Also Rusty mentioned that he's going to add a couple of more codes. So those will be added to the tutorial. And he also recognized that it'd be a useful help file for other weblogs as well. Which is why the title isn't "HTML for Kuro5shin Posting".

PS. Rusty's going to link it to the Allowed HTML as a helpfile, which was my only intention. I posted the article only to get feedback.



[ Parent ]

Stand-alone version (none / 0) (#27)
by raph on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 06:49:45 PM EST

Ok, I have a stand-alone version up. I moved <a> up in the list because I consider it especially important, but otherwise pretty much left it alone.

Please feel free to use or adapt my version, and make sure to keep those royalty checks to Mrs. Edna Graustein coming.

[ Parent ]

Re: Stand-alone version (none / 0) (#31)
by FlinkDelDinky on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 07:15:45 PM EST

Hey, that looks pretty good!

[ Parent ]
Pretty basic :-)... (1.00 / 1) (#9)
by scorpion on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 10:54:03 AM EST

scorpion voted -1 on this story.

Pretty basic :-)

I'm sorry... who doesn't know html ... (3.00 / 1) (#4)
by evro on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 11:12:54 AM EST

evro voted 1 on this story.

I'm sorry... who doesn't know html by now? Well, I guess maybe there are a few people but this just seems basic for web users, especially those that read tech sites/weblogs. If/when this gets posted, maybe rusty can include a link to this story on the submit story and post comment pages, like "click here for a summary of the html chars"? Also, I propose adding <pre> to the allowed HTML, and adding

TT {font-family: courier; font-size: 10pt} PRE {font-family: courier; font-size: 10pt}

to kuro5hin's stylesheets. Sometimes ya want to print a bit of code or something and have it format properly.

Other nice tags would be <xmp> (example) and <code>, though these do the same thing as <pre>.
---
"Asking me who to follow -- don't ask me, I don't know!"

Re: I'm sorry... who doesn't know html ... (none / 0) (#19)
by superfly on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 05:14:10 PM EST

some bits:

<xmp> is obsolete; you should use <pre> instead.

<code> is not the same as <pre>. Most browsers render both in a
monospaced font, but extra whitespace (including newlines) is preserved with
<pre>. Whitespace within a CODE element is reduced to one space, like in
most HTML.

It would be nice to have CODE and CITE available, along with the other phrase
elements (DFN, SAMP, KBD, VAR, ABBR, ACRONYM).

I would rather not have explicit font-size statements. I already had to adjust
my X resources to make some web sites more readable.


[ Parent ]
Re: I'm sorry... who doesn't know html ... (none / 0) (#20)
by rusty on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 06:04:43 PM EST

I'm planning to convert most of the font stuff to stylesheets,a nd allow users to set their own in their prefs. So if you, for example, hate verdana, you could make your norm_font arial. Look for this in the coming weeks.

Oh yeah, and <PRE> is allowed, I think.

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]

Re: I'm sorry... who doesn't know html ... (none / 0) (#21)
by evro on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 06:18:04 PM EST

This
        is
            a
                   test!
                             nice!
                                        now we'll see if pre works...

I guess it does! Still needs a monospaced font, though.
---
"Asking me who to follow -- don't ask me, I don't know!"
[ Parent ]

Re: I'm sorry... who doesn't know html ... (none / 0) (#23)
by rusty on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 06:35:31 PM EST

I think it counts verdana as monospaced. That's my only guess as to why it doesn't change the font for stuff like PRE and TT. Unless specifying a font overrides that bit of the spec...

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
Re: I'm sorry... who doesn't know html ... (none / 0) (#32)
by FlinkDelDinky on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 07:23:05 PM EST

I use Linux and when I write the article TT didn't seem to work, but I stuck it in there anyway.<> However, I use the Lizard from time to time to measure its progress (K5 actually looks better in Mozilla) and the TT does work.<> Must be a netscape problem.

[ Parent ]
Re: I'm sorry... who doesn't know html ... (none / 0) (#35)
by evro on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 08:27:40 PM EST

If you have a <pre> inside a <font></font>, it gets
fontified, so if you say font face=verdana, it's going to make the pre verdana.
 Letting the user specify the font in the style sheet is a cool idea, one that
I never thought of... I'll have to try it out.

---
"Asking me who to follow -- don't ask me, I don't know!"
[ Parent ]
Much better. Now fix the home page... (none / 0) (#7)
by eann on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 11:55:40 AM EST

eann voted 1 on this story.

Much better. Now fix the home page. :)

Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men. —MLK

$email =~ s/0/o/; # The K5 cabal is out to get you.


I already know HTML, but I'll vote ... (none / 0) (#3)
by tnt on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 12:01:21 PM EST

tnt voted 1 on this story.

I already know HTML, but I'll vote Post it! (+1) for all those who don't know HTML. It will probably be informative and useful to them.

--
     Charles Iliya Krempeaux, B.Sc.
__________________________________________________
  Kuro5hin user #279

The teletype bit didn't work...... (none / 0) (#6)
by alisdair on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 12:13:24 PM EST

alisdair voted 1 on this story.

The teletype bit didn't work...

Re: The teletype bit didn't work...... (none / 0) (#22)
by raph on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 06:35:29 PM EST

Advogato has the same issue. Basically, when you specify a <font> tag, it overrides the defaults, including the monospaced font default for the tag. Personally, I think this is broken behavior on the part of the browser. Probably the easiest (if not the most elegant) way to get around this problem is to have the HTML munger wrap a <font face="courier"> around the troublesome tag. That's probably what I'll end up doing.

[ Parent ]
Second try (none / 0) (#24)
by raph on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 06:37:23 PM EST

Advogato has the same issue. Basically, when you specify a <font> tag, it overrides the defaults, including the monospaced font default for the <tt> tag. Personally, I think this is broken behavior on the part of the browser. Probably the easiest (if not the most elegant) way to get around this problem is to have the HTML munger wrap a <font face="courier"> around the troublesome tag. That's probably what I'll end up doing. [ Rusty - you have the same problem Advogato did until recently - clicking the "Preview" button runs the text through the munger, which de-escapes the entities. In general, you want the text window to be completely unmodified by the "Preview" action. You probably already know about this, but I thought I'd mention it. ]

[ Parent ]
Third try (none / 0) (#25)
by raph on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 06:38:50 PM EST

Advogato has the same issue. Basically, when you specify a <font> tag, it overrides the defaults, including the monospaced font default for the <tt> tag. Personally, I think this is broken behavior on the part of the browser.

Probably the easiest (if not the most elegant) way to get around this problem is to have the HTML munger wrap a <font face="courier"> around the troublesome tag. That's probably what I'll end up doing.

[ Rusty - you have the same problem Advogato did until recently - clicking the "Preview" button runs the text through the munger, which de-escapes the entities. In general, you want the text window to be completely unmodified by the "Preview" action. You probably already know about this, but I thought I'd mention it. ]

Gagh! I overlooked the fact that you need to put in the <p> tags explicitly on this site, that a double-newline doesn't do it for you. Oh well.

[ Parent ]

Re: Third try (none / 0) (#26)
by rusty on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 06:49:30 PM EST

actually, it's the browser that munges entities. I need to extra-unmunge them. Like, when you preview, if you have &lt; in your text, it'll stay '&lt;'. But when it writes that into the browser textbox, that entity becomes a <. Which I think is broken. But that's the way it is.
____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
and furthermore... (none / 0) (#28)
by rusty on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 06:50:55 PM EST

I wrote a whole lot more stuff, but it disappeared mysteriously. Ok, that sucks. Anyway, it was about making sure that html entites don't get turned into literal characters in the textbox. The summary was, this issue will be fixed very soon, I promise. :-)

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
Re: and furthermore... (none / 0) (#29)
by raph on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 07:04:56 PM EST

Ah, ok. Then the bug is a little different than the one that Advogato had. My code escaped all the metacharacters that appeared in the textbox contents, but ran an additional munging step first. Sounds like you correctly avoided the initial munging, but didn't catch the textbox escaping bit.

Broken or no, I think this is the behavior the spec calls for. BTW, I just tried to exercise the bug of many browsers accepting &#139; and &#155; as < and >, respectively. But it looks like your code is already catching that.

[ Parent ]

Houston, we have a problem (none / 0) (#36)
by raph on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 10:34:55 PM EST

Uhm, I think it was actually Netscape that was changing the characters. I'm posting this from telnet port 80, so I know what it's going to do. If this text is blinking, then the site has a vulnerability which allows arbitrary HTML tags to be posted: ‹blink›Test?‹/blink›

[ Parent ]
Re: Houston, we have a problem (none / 0) (#39)
by rusty on Fri Apr 14, 2000 at 01:31:38 AM EST

Damn. Thanks for the heads up. But did it have to be a blink tag? ;-)

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
Another Test... (none / 0) (#46)
by rusty on Wed Apr 19, 2000 at 08:48:06 PM EST

Let's see what this does.

&#139;BLINK&#155;Blinking?&#139;/BLINK&#155;

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]

Even better... (none / 0) (#47)
by rusty on Wed Apr 19, 2000 at 08:52:25 PM EST

Let's try this instead:

<BLINK>The carats should be literals...</BLINK>

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]

<P> Tags (none / 0) (#44)
by kraant on Sat Apr 15, 2000 at 11:26:48 AM EST

This just reminded me of something that's been bugging me a fair bit about the description for the <P> Tag.

<P> isn't like <BR> which just indicates a line break

<P> is actualy used as the equivalent of <P> in "<P> foobar </P>" as opposed to </P>

Try it out... if you put a <P> ahead of a paragraph it won't create a line break in front of it.

Sheesh I mean it's a basic HTML tutorial.... Now can we have a tutorial on getting tables to actualy do what you want them to do without using arcane and totaly irrelevant attributes? pweese?

ps. It seems to be solved but one elegant way to solve the <TT> vs <Font> problem (I think) I haven't tried it yet would be to set a css file up and put in the a css file

tt {
   font-family: monospace;
}

And then link to that css file from the other pages. The collary to this is that with a css file you don't need Font tags (which you shouldn't be using anyway as they are deprecated) bad rusty *thwap thwap thwap* ;P

a css file would be good for other things too (such as HTML 4.0 compliancy which kuro5hin seems nowhere near with it's munging left right and center of the HTML in an effort to get it to work)

daniel (please let the < and > characters work please!)
--
"kraant, open source guru" -- tumeric
Never In Our Names...
[ Parent ]

What point does this have, other th... (none / 0) (#13)
by jammer on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 12:28:21 PM EST

jammer voted -1 on this story.

What point does this have, other than a basic tutorial in rudimentary HTML? Not very interesting, sorry.
"The tree of liberty must occasonally be watered with the blood of patriots and tyrants." -- Thomas Jefferson.

Put it below the comment board as a... (none / 0) (#2)
by Strange Charmed One on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 12:28:32 PM EST

Strange Charmed One voted 1 on this story.

Put it below the comment board as a link after it comes off the front page.
--
Feel the urge to put excessively cute little quotes into your .sig?

JUST SAY NO!

If you or one of your friends is frequently plagued by this tendency, Help IS available- Ask me how.

I liked the previous version.... (1.00 / 1) (#12)
by homer on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 12:33:44 PM EST

homer voted -1 on this story.

I liked the previous version.
-----------
doh!

This covers the topic very well. Sh... (2.00 / 1) (#8)
by error 404 on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 12:46:24 PM EST

error 404 voted 1 on this story.

This covers the topic very well. Short, to the point, but complete enough for most users.

As a professional writer of instructions, I'm impressed.

On the other hand, it may be too basic for this audience. But there is nothing wrong with revisiting the basics now and then.
..................................
Electrical banana is bound to be the very next phase
- Donovan

This is wrong. (3.00 / 1) (#30)
by Inoshiro on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 07:15:04 PM EST

This is not a judgement comment. This is a nitpick/constructive criticism. Your paragraph tags are incorrect, as are some of your other notes. I thought this message would be more beneficial than me just "correcting" your article for you :-)

The < p > tag starts a paragraph. The way you have it setup, it looks like you use them at the end of a paragraph, as if they were like line breaks. This is not so. You should also consider mentioning the END of paragraph (< /p >). IE: I write this as < p >My paragraph < /p > ..

Second, < ol > is ordered list. < ul > is unordered list. You list both as unordered. This is wrong.

While I doubt the minor bits of HTML used in weblog comments matter, if you used that kind of layout in a webpage, you'd be setting yourself up for some problems. And if you are making webpages already, don't forget to pick a DTD and verify against when you do make pages. I hate pages that are DTD-less.

PS: I spaced out the tags because I didn't feel like typing up lots of entities ;-)



--
[ イノシロ ]
Re: This is wrong. (none / 0) (#33)
by FlinkDelDinky on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 08:12:31 PM EST

The < p > tag starts a paragraph

You're correct of course. I saw no reason to use the 'p' '/p'. You've got a blank line either way, and I suspect most webloggers do it that way.

But I think when Rusty officially updates the Allowed Tags I'll update the 'p' to the official way. Apperently it causes problems because IE doesn't always process 'p' correctly and needs the '/p' sometimes (even though /p is supposed to be optional).

Hmm, now that I think about it maybe not. I see no advantage to web loggers. I think I'll shift the 'p' to the front of the paragraph and mention that's a good idea to use '/p' on the real pages.

Second, < ol > is ordered list. < ul > is unordered list. You list both as unordered. This is wrong.

I just checked and the list headings are correct.

don't forget to pick a DTD and verify against when you do make pages

What is DTD? Never heard of that. As far as doing Web pages, ughh, I've got no plans.

Hey, I definately like putting 'p' in front better, now I'll just click on preview to see if I still like it.

[ Parent ]

Re: This is wrong. (none / 0) (#37)
by Inoshiro on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 10:36:06 PM EST

Rusty's code assumes things, and sticks a < p > in front of the comment. So the first tag I normally use is a close paragraph.

After that, it's standard paragraph stuff. I prefer having explicit paragraph breaks and the like because it minimizes the differences of rendering that browsers tend to exhibit.

DTDs are Document Type Definitions. They are the SGML definition of the specific HTML version we are using. SGML is a superset of HTML and XML. XML is basically SGML, as it allows you to create tags and mark things by their purpose, not by their looks. Context ;-) HTML is the least flexible, until you throw in CSS. I prefer to work with HTML 4.0 transitional with CSS1. If your browser supports it (IE 4.x/5.x, Opera 3.x, Netscape 4.x mostly, Mozilla *), you'll see it fine. And it still looks OK in Lynx, as I tend to use that browser, too. :-)



--
[ イノシロ ]
[ Parent ]
Re: This is wrong. (none / 0) (#45)
by bmaust on Sun Apr 16, 2000 at 04:19:53 PM EST

IE doesn't always process 'p' correctly and needs the '/p' sometimes (even though /p is supposed to be optional).

According to HTML 4.01, the closing tag is optional, but you should always start paragraphs with them rather than end them, because when text is contained within a < P > tag it may pick up formatting or other features that it wouldn' t otherwise. If you only use < P >s at the end of paragraphs, then your first paragraph won't be associatied with a tag, and therefor remain unformatted.

With CSS the < p > tag should only be used when you actually mean to start a new paragraph and things like line spacing et cetera should be done using a stylesheet.

IE (at least up to 5.1) does deal poorly with paragraphs without end tags. Both it and netscape, though, will reapply a relative font-size attribute to new paragraphs unless you end the former ones with < /p >s. For intance, if you had:

< P > Text
< P > Another Line
< P > Some More Text
and defined P in a stylesheet to have a size like .85em, each line would get successively smaller because the .85 is interpreted from the current size, not from the one in the browser preferences. The moral of the story is: use < BR > for line breaks; use < P > and < /P > to show where paragraphs begin and end.

DTDs are Document Type Definitions. They should be put into the top of our HTML documents so the browser and web server know what sort of file they're dealing with. They aren't necessary for things like comments and stories here, because they're already in rusty's code, but if you want to look them up, see here for the current one for HTML.

[ Parent ]

Re: This is wrong. (none / 0) (#34)
by rusty on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 08:13:38 PM EST

Second, < ol > is ordered list. < ul > is unordered list. You list both as unordered. This is wrong.

No he didn't. Read again-- it says "< ul >, < ol >, < li >: unordered list, ordered list, and list item". Then the examples are labeled ordered and unordered.

As for < /P >, I dislike that tag, personally, because it forces a line break, even if there's nothing below it. And it is not required by the DTD. So... basically, you really don't need to even know it exists.

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]

Blockquote -- I cite: (4.00 / 1) (#38)
by kmself on Thu Apr 13, 2000 at 11:28:11 PM EST

Another trick with blockquote is useful when, say, quoting text from elsewhere:

Example:
This text is regular text<blockquote>But now I'm going to blockquote this large chunk of text so that you can see what happens with blockquoting. You probably won't use it much. Then again this is my first real html document and I'm already using it. Go figure.</blockquote>

Results in:
This text is regular text

But now I'm going to blockquote this large chunk of text so that you can see what happens with blockquoting. You probably won't use it much. Then again this is my first real html document and I'm already using it. Go figure.

In some browsers (Netscape, Mozilla), this renders with a blue line running vertically next to the cited text. It's especially useful for nested quotations where other conventions (italics, < quote characters, and      multiple indents) are onerous.

The tag? <blockquote type="cite"> cited text </blockquote>:

cited text

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.

Re: Blockquote -- I cite: (none / 0) (#40)
by FlinkDelDinky on Fri Apr 14, 2000 at 01:41:14 AM EST

That's pretty neat. However I wrote the turorial as a quick and dirty help file for people (like me) who not only don't know HTML but like it that way.

But if you look at the file you'll see to links per tag. One goes to a formal definition, and the other goes to an example. I really didn't test all the options. Besides b, i, p, br, and a are 95% solutions, add ul, ol, li and you've got a 98% solution for weblog posting.

I think some original content articles could use images though. Or maybe not...

[ Parent ]

Just showing (none / 0) (#43)
by kmself on Fri Apr 14, 2000 at 08:57:56 PM EST

Your tutorial is pretty good -- covers all the basics in a short space. I've just found the "cite" blockquote option very handy, thought I'd mention it. That's all.

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.
[ Parent ]

An HTML primer for posting on weblogs (fixed!) | 47 comments (47 topical, 0 editorial, 0 hidden)
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