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[P]
System monitors for 'Nix

By kmself in News
Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 12:47:34 PM EST
Tags: Software (all tags)
Software

In the beginning there was top, and it was good. Then MIT created X Windows and we all ran xload. Unto us came Linus and lo we had xosview, yea now it is every desktop-cum-window manager hath monitoring tools, born recently unto us is gkrellm, as spake the prophet LinuxCare.



So what's your preferred mode of monitoring the health, sanity, and well-being of your system? What do they do well, what features are lacking? What hacks have you done to get the news you need to your face?

My own faves are asmon, wmifs, wmmon, wminet and, of course, wmspaceweather. They tuck away neatly on the dock or hide in the clip of my WindowMaker desktop.

xrootconsole hits the spot for monitoring logs and such that GUI panels just can't do, played out on the X root window, with transparent backgrounds, no less!

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Related Links
o xosview
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Display: Sort:
System monitors for 'Nix | 54 comments (54 topical, editorial, 0 hidden)
I prefer stories with both technolo... (1.00 / 1) (#27)
by DemiGodez on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 04:13:34 PM EST

DemiGodez voted -1 on this story.

I prefer stories with both technology and culture.

go here or #slashdot.... (2.00 / 1) (#10)
by Velian on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 04:36:57 PM EST

Velian voted -1 on this story.

go here or #slashdot.

mpstat(1M) is nice on Solaris.... (3.00 / 1) (#16)
by sergent on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 04:37:25 PM EST

sergent voted 1 on this story.

mpstat(1M) is nice on Solaris.

Wozzit do, hozzit look, wherezzit run? (none / 0) (#49)
by kmself on Mon May 01, 2000 at 02:42:10 AM EST

Details, details. I was sorta kinda hoping that folks who'd mention specific tools would give some how what why and where for their own particular picks. Anyway, I dug up an mpstat man page which tells a bit more. Looks like a top-like reporting tool, no?

...and, being a Solaris tool, I suspect you can't get it for Linux (not that Linux is the only Unix, but it's the best <g>)? There's a certain benefit to having cross-platform tools.

One of the things I'll give credit to Solaris for -- iowait. This is a measure of how time for a given process is devoted to waiting for IO. It's a useful measure of disk contention, which is hard to come by in most other Unices. Very useful in my prior life as a SAS consultant.

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.
[ Parent ]

I keep the multiload_applet on my g... (4.00 / 1) (#1)
by rusty on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 04:43:34 PM EST

rusty voted 1 on this story.

I keep the multiload_applet on my gnome panel, which shows CPU usage, memory usage and swap, in nice little graphs that tick along with time. I also watch disk space with the gnome diskusage applet. These do for me, generally. When I need more detailed stats, it's good old top all the way. I used to run root-tail fro logs, but I found that it (or X or something) leaks memory, and eventually would have to be restarted and stuff. Anyway I don't have any important servers running locally anymore.

____
Not the real rusty

I pretty much stick to blackbox uti... (4.00 / 1) (#22)
by jetpack on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 04:56:56 PM EST

jetpack voted 1 on this story.

I pretty much stick to blackbox utilities, so I'm running bbsload and not much else. I used to use bbppp (i think thats what it was called) but since I dont have any use for ppp anymore, it's nixed from my machine. It's a nice little app tho.
--
/* The beatings will continue until morale improves */

I'm new and want to know what to us... (5.00 / 1) (#26)
by IcI on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 05:00:15 PM EST

IcI voted 1 on this story.

I'm new and want to know what to use
<pre> oo oo
BIG Brother is watching
\\ \/ /\ //
OO OO OO OO OO OO OO OO cc dd
</pre>

What to use and when -- what are your needs? (none / 0) (#47)
by kmself on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 10:56:55 PM EST

The answer, of course, depends on what you want to monitor, and why.

The usual suspects are CPU utilization (or load average, or both), memory and swap, and disk I/O. Any of the basic tools -- xosview, xload, asmon, wmmon, gkrellm, etc., will provide you with instantaneous or historic (usually past 5-10 minutes) graphs of utilization.

Above and beyond this -- it's usually helpful to know what time it is (so you can guage how upset your SO/boss will be over your tardiness), whether or not you've got mail (frequently from same SO/boss). Hence the console utilities "date" (little known fact: derived from afformentioned SO issue [1]), and biff (little known fact: derived from a dog's name at Berkeley[2]) which notified you of new mail. There are now any number of mail and timekeeping utilities. I find a sweep second hand to be useful (despite my usuall aversion of anything that moves) as it's a useful indicator of a wedged X session.

Enter networking, either ethernet or PPP, and it's helpful to know whether or not you've got a live connection and/or how much traffic is on it. In my case, wmppp and wmifs indicate live connections and load.

There are a number of things I'd like to be able to track or be alerted of which aren't directly addressed by the more common monitors I'm aware of. Knowing which processes (and/or users) are accounting for network traffic is a big one, particularly as I automate more network processes -- mail, news, system upgrades -- some of which run for an appreciable amount of time. netstat is good but has limitations, ntop seems like it ought to do the trick but never quite seems to cut it (both are console tools). xrootconsole, tied to the right file or process, does pretty well.

Notes:

[1] ...ok, so I lied.
[2] This actually is true.

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.
[ Parent ]

System monitors are the coolest thi... (3.00 / 1) (#14)
by End on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 05:15:53 PM EST

End voted 1 on this story.

System monitors are the coolest things for making your computer look like it's doing something useful.

I was wondering if anyone knows of a network system monitor that runs under text mode; I have a li'l ol' firewall in my house for our LAN's DSL connection, and I don't run X on it of course; it would be very nice to have a monitor on there with blinkenlichten to make it look more like a firewall... (yes, I know I don't even really need a monitor on the thing but it works and I'm too lazy to set up any kind of remote login...)

-JD

Re: System monitors are the coolest thi... (none / 0) (#36)
by Anonymous Hero on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 02:19:39 PM EST

Look on Freshmeat:
console/monitoring
daemons/misc

For anyone running a headless server, there are also some monitors that display info (like send/receive lights) on the keyboard LEDs.

[ Parent ]
Re: System monitors are the coolest thi... (none / 0) (#44)
by Anonymous Hero on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 07:01:11 PM EST

Yeah, get yourself a copy of a program called iptraf -- Really great text based network monitor. Try freshmeat or google for your search.

[ Parent ]
Zzz...... (1.00 / 1) (#32)
by drdink on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 06:10:35 PM EST

drdink voted 0 on this story.

Zzz...

vmstat iostat nfsstat and sar. onc... (3.00 / 1) (#2)
by asad on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 06:45:10 PM EST

asad voted -1 on this story.

vmstat iostat nfsstat and sar. once you have gone down the path of top you have gone too far.

Detail? (none / 0) (#40)
by kmself on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 06:24:06 PM EST

One reason I'd posted this story was to seek more detail on the gkrellm tool. I posted my own faves with links to detailed information (including screenshots and capabilities).

So, what do your tools do? What systems do they run on? IIRC, these are all either Solaris or HPUX specific tools, no? "sar" is someone's "system administration resource" or some such. Not generally available. While you're at it, what about proctool -- gtop and ktop seemed preferable to me.

What functionality do they provide? Why do you like them?

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.
[ Parent ]

Re: Detail? (none / 0) (#51)
by asad on Mon May 01, 2000 at 02:51:22 PM EST

Ask and thou shall receive. All of the utilites that I mentioned are for Solaris 2.6 I am pretty sure that also exist on 2.7 and 2.8. sar is system activity report btw. Whey do I like thes tools well I guess I am biased toward anything that's text mode since most of the time I don't have X running on the server and also because of the level of detail I can get out of them. Since we are talking about system monitoring and performance I should mention that if you run solairs you should really check out Brian Wong and Adrian Cockroft's books on the subject. I still haven't seen anything equivalent for Linux. I am not sure what you mean about protocol can you explain in more detail ? As for what the tools do take a look here they give a better explanation than I do.

[ Parent ]
I still use top most of the time. O... (4.50 / 2) (#21)
by nicktamm on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 07:06:50 PM EST

nicktamm voted 1 on this story.

I still use top most of the time. Of course I use consoles more than X anyway, so thats probably why. If I was going to use one for X though, I would probably use The Moaning Goat Monitor :).
Nick Tamm nick-k5@echorequest.net http://www.nicktamm.org

Re: MGM (4.00 / 1) (#41)
by Notromda on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 06:25:04 PM EST

Gack, I love perl, but..... A system load monitor that uses more memory than emacs? eewwwwww! :P It does look nice, though...

[ Parent ]
Mildly interesting, but nicely writ... (1.00 / 1) (#24)
by nictamer on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 08:19:11 PM EST

nictamer voted 1 on this story.

Mildly interesting, but nicely written.
--
Religion is for sheep.

Rounding down from +.5 -- again, ei... (2.00 / 1) (#3)
by Demona on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 10:10:34 PM EST

Demona voted 0 on this story.

Rounding down from +.5 -- again, either too narrow focus and/or not enough meat.

Nothing wrong with good ol' top.... (3.00 / 1) (#7)
by skim123 on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 10:11:02 PM EST

skim123 voted 1 on this story.

Nothing wrong with good ol' top.

Money is in some respects like fire; it is a very excellent servant but a terrible master.
PT Barnum


gkrellm rocks!... (2.00 / 1) (#15)
by buzzbomb on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 10:16:26 PM EST

buzzbomb voted 1 on this story.

gkrellm rocks!

Unix is the OS for people who care ... (4.00 / 1) (#11)
by mihalis on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 10:47:47 PM EST

mihalis voted 1 on this story.

Unix is the OS for people who care about culture. Ok so it's programming culture first and foremost, but then we have networking, mathematics, typesetting etc etc. Ok that's nearly completely offtopic. What I'm trying to say is that anything that helps me keep my *nix boxen healthy suits my view of "technology and culture from the trenches".
-- Chris Morgan <see em at mihalis dot net>

I wanna know ---... (1.00 / 1) (#5)
by davidu on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 11:11:53 PM EST

davidu voted 1 on this story.

I wanna know ---

... (1.00 / 1) (#20)
by Commienst on Fri Apr 28, 2000 at 11:43:48 PM EST

Commienst voted -1 on this story.



Love to get the k5 consensus on thi... (2.00 / 1) (#18)
by warpeightbot on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 01:26:00 AM EST

warpeightbot voted 1 on this story.

Love to get the k5 consensus on this...

I've never been much of a system mo... (2.00 / 1) (#19)
by magney on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 03:13:09 AM EST

magney voted 1 on this story.

I've never been much of a system monitorer myself, aside from occasionally rifling through the system logs to see if there's any mysterious incidents. But maybe I should. Kinda neat to see how many different ways I can choose to do it...

Do I look like I speak for my employer?

If there were a similarly themed ma... (3.00 / 1) (#12)
by your_desired_username on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 04:41:20 AM EST

your_desired_username voted 1 on this story.

If there were a similarly themed mail-order catalog for free software

There is. freshmeat. Which is where I originally found gkrellm.

top(1) is probably the system monitoring tool I use most. ktop is next. date(1) is in my prompt, but I do not consider it a system monitoring tool. Never been much of an xload liker. Hard drives are so big these days, I do not even remember what df(1) does.

Can we please have preview for voting? I have blathered on for paragraphs and I have forgotten everything I have said. I do not even know if I have close all of my html tags.

The point of this artice being?... (1.00 / 1) (#30)
by shonson on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 07:54:18 AM EST

shonson voted -1 on this story.

The point of this artice being?
-- Steven in #kuro5hin

The point of this post being? (none / 0) (#50)
by kmself on Mon May 01, 2000 at 02:46:14 AM EST

I saw the gkrellm post at LinuxCare through LinuxToday. I've been playing with a number of system monitors, am pretty happy with what I've got through various WM dockable applets. Monitoring systems falls somewhere between fun and essential -- I like to know what my systems are doing, and if / where / when things may be going haywire. There are certain conditions I'd very much like to monitor but haven't figured out how to do this yet. So, the article was written to stimulate discussion on the topic.

Your post, OTOH, could largely have been summed up by your vote ranking alone. IMNSHO.

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.
[ Parent ]

ps aux and top hehe... (2.00 / 2) (#6)
by mattc on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 10:21:11 AM EST

mattc voted 1 on this story.

ps aux and top hehe

Interesting. Most people I see use ... (3.00 / 1) (#17)
by zforce on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 11:33:31 AM EST

zforce voted 1 on this story.

Interesting. Most people I see use a transparent eterm set to background in their X environments. Did that root-console program used to be called Roottail?

Seems like a worthwhile topic for d... (2.00 / 1) (#28)
by Wodin on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 12:45:22 PM EST

Wodin voted 1 on this story.

Seems like a worthwhile topic for discussion and information interchange, in a way that some other topics aren't.

top works fine for my needs. I real... (3.00 / 1) (#13)
by inspire on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 01:16:47 PM EST

inspire voted -1 on this story.

top works fine for my needs. I really dont see the point of people putting system monitors on their desktop. Seems like a waste of valuable screen real-estate.
--
What is the helix?

This story is lacking heavily in th... (4.00 / 1) (#31)
by flamingcow on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 01:36:24 PM EST

flamingcow voted -1 on this story.

This story is lacking heavily in the "console tools" section. Anyone feel like rewriting this with some info for those of us who don't like X?

Shout it out loud. (none / 0) (#37)
by StatGrape on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 02:56:12 PM EST

Yes, my brother... yes.

-SG

NerdPerfect
[ Parent ]

Console and GUI (none / 0) (#39)
by kmself on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 06:09:02 PM EST

There's a relatively clear division of function, IMO, between GUI and console tools. In particular, for detailed analysis or bugtracking, what I want is logs I can grep through, console-based monitors (or raw /proc files) for information and status updates, and the rest.

But that's usually after I discover I've got a problem. Which is where the GUI fits in. Monitoring load, memory, swap, and network traffic, I've got a pretty good general idea of what's going on with my system. Abnormal readings in any one area and I can then go the the appropriate system tool for further digging.

I mentioned the WindowMaker monitoring utilities in my post. Three of these, wmmon, asmon, and wminet, are multimeters -- I get multiple functionality in 64x64 pixels of screen real estate. In the case of wmmon, I have to click through multiple graphs, asmon and wminet present five channels of output each.

The other thing that's useful from a GUI perspective is historical activity. Knowing current metrics are helpful, but having a historical trace on how it fits into context is also of use.

Again, getting to context, wminet is a really slick tool -- clicking on one of the five display lines (procs, users, ftp, http, smtp) brings up a console display of an appropriate tool, top and who among them.

And, in the specific case of running in console mode, you simply don't have the option of running a utility in the corner of a screen. You can probably work out tricks with syslog or emacs, but otherwise you're stuck with a single screen of text-based data. Powerful in some senses, limited in others.

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.
[ Parent ]

Re: Console and GUI (none / 0) (#48)
by StatGrape on Mon May 01, 2000 at 01:00:54 AM EST

"And, in the specific case of running in console mode, you simply don't have the option of running a utility in the corner of a screen. "

That's what virtual consoles are for. I'd sure rather have two of those running on my web server than having to run X for no other reason than to monitor system activity. In a workstation environment where some GUI is likely to be running, it's a different story... but what about dedicated servers? I, for one, am certainly not about to waste precious RAM on a bloated GUI when a console tool should fit the bill.

-SG

NerdPerfect
[ Parent ]

Servers (none / 0) (#52)
by kmself on Mon May 01, 2000 at 04:30:09 PM EST

...but I might ask what you're doing walking over to a server to work on it. That's so, like, 20th Century <g>.

I'm running a lab of seven systems, plus accessing/admining: desktop, home box, two active webservers, a couple of network servers. All from one X session with a slew of ssh sessions out of it. While I can (and have) run a 'top' in a term window to monitor systems, it's also helpful to be able to run a meter on one or more of the systems I'm working on, particularly if there are resource issues.

About the only time I have to physically access a system console is for boot, BIOS, or network configuration. Otherwise, use TCP/IP the way God intended.

FWIW, though, I dump syslog output to VC 12 of my desktop -- both so it goes somewhere and so it stays of the consoles when I am using them.

--
Karsten M. Self
SCO -- backgrounder on Caldera/SCO vs IBM
Support the EFF!!
There is no K5 cabal.
[ Parent ]

Re: Servers (none / 0) (#54)
by oxidi5ed on Tue May 02, 2000 at 07:24:31 AM EST

Dear Evangelist/Hacker/Pimp, BTW, does that vector (Evangelist/Hacker/Pimp) read from left-to-right or v-v, or do you run some sort of multi-threaded life? I don't think my grilf would approve of a .sig like that. except I don't have one (a .sig like that or a grilf). Anyway, I have 3 desktop boxes , two running Linux and one running Windoze NT 4.0, and I want 3 monitors on or at least surrounding my desk, one displaying the Windoze desktop in all its mediocrity and two displaying whichever X desktop manager currently takes my fancy. I would upgrade the Windoze box to a proper OS if I could but my employers won't let me. I want to have only one keyboard/mouse and some simple software means of switching which machine the keystrokes and mouse moves are sent to (or just keystrokes at worst), but don't want to purchase any new hardware KVM switch or any such gizmo. Any ideas? oxidi5ed (no relation to you know who...) PS Are you guys ever going to release any, like, code for that Gestalt System thing? I mean, the Web pages have been up there for well over a month and you still don't have a replacement for SAS ready! How long does it take? -O <-- that's meant to be, like, a covalently bound oxygen atom, my .sig. Cool, huh?

[ Parent ]
Ugh, bait for yet another tool-vs-t... (1.50 / 2) (#8)
by fluffy grue on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 02:56:29 PM EST

fluffy grue voted -1 on this story.

Ugh, bait for yet another tool-vs-tool war, complete with annoying writeup.
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]

... (1.00 / 1) (#25)
by Camelot on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 05:18:21 PM EST

Camelot voted 0 on this story.



Making your desktop both efficient ... (4.00 / 1) (#23)
by Paradox on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 10:36:30 PM EST

Paradox voted 1 on this story.

Making your desktop both efficient and nice looking is a cool thing. I really like Gkrellm, it realy is a category killer, especially since I've stoped using WindowMaker (sawmill is so much nicer) and those doclets aren't as usefull.

Between gkrellm and a few xrootconsoles you can really know what is going on with your system, while at the same time lookin quite spiffy.
Dave "Paradox" Fayram

print print join q( ), split(q,q,,reverse qq;#qsti
qq)\;qlre;.q.pqevolqiqdog.);#1 reason to grin at Perl
print "\n";

Re: Making your desktop both efficient ... (3.00 / 1) (#38)
by ramses0 on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 04:45:49 PM EST

At the risk of starting a massive flamewar, I'd really like to hear more about sawmill. I use windowmaker right now, but i've heard very good things about sawmill, but would like to hear a little more before i ditch old-reliable WM.

Either respond here, or do up an informative piece and submit it, I'd be interested and thankful for any insight you can give.

--Robert
[ rate all comments , for great justice | sell.com ]
[ Parent ]

Lame "me too" post (none / 0) (#42)
by Notromda on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 06:27:28 PM EST

Well, the subject says it... But I'm curios too. anyone?

[ Parent ]
Sawmill (none / 0) (#45)
by superfly on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 08:28:44 PM EST

I've been using Sawmill for a few months, and I really like it. I've used Window Maker and Enlightenment before, and Sawmill feels like a good combination of the two. It's fast like WM, and crazy themeable like E (see sawmill.themes.org).

Sawmill is sort of like Emacs. The basics are written in C, and the rest is in Lisp. Take a look at the Sawmill customization repository or the Sawmill software map (seems to be broken right now) for examples of what you can do. One of the most useful I've found is a regular expression-based window title rewriter. Instead of all those "Netscape: foo" windows, I now have "foo (Netscape)".

Window managing is about all Sawmill does. There is no clip, no dock, no toolbar. There are also no icons -- windows disappear when iconified. There is a root menu, but it's a separate program. Pagers and such have been written if you want that. I hear the Sawmill plays well with Gnome because there isn't a lot of overlap in functionality like you get with E. I don't use Gnome, but a lot of Sawmill users seem to.

Other stuff: multiple workspaces, easy key binding, fairly clear config files. Oh yeah... the name is changing to Sawfish soon (for legal reasons), so all those URLs might change.



[ Parent ]
Re: Sawmill (none / 0) (#46)
by Notromda on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 09:31:34 PM EST

I've tried various WM's before, and I always come back to WindowMaker, because of it's simplicity and speed. I have to say though, that sawmill is pretty impressive. I just installed a few rpms, and tweaked the configuration (graphically!) and it is rockin. No silly icons in the dock or bottom of the screen, either. alt-# didn't switch desktops immediately (one of my most used features of WM) but that was easy to fix. To answer my own question, it looks very nice...

[ Parent ]
yawn.... (1.00 / 1) (#4)
by fvw on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 11:04:24 PM EST

fvw voted -1 on this story.

yawn.

hmm ... very OS specific and more t... (2.00 / 1) (#29)
by ejf on Sat Apr 29, 2000 at 11:23:26 PM EST

ejf voted -1 on this story.

hmm ... very OS specific and more the stuff a slashdot poll would be made off ...
--- men are reasoning, not reasonable animals.

Are there any temperature sensor ty... (3.00 / 1) (#9)
by alisdair on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 11:41:05 AM EST

alisdair voted 1 on this story.

Are there any temperature sensor type things available? Are there even drivers for Linux?

I've just got a new Abit BP6, and I use Hardware Doctor under Windows 98 to keep an eye on the CPU temperatures and voltages. I'd really like to be able to do the same under Linux. Is it possible?

Re: Are there any temperature sensor ty... (none / 0) (#33)
by nicktamm on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 02:04:19 PM EST

Abit has thrown together a distribution of their own called Gentus, which includes a monitor for the temperature of boards I think.

Of corse, I only know this because people are claiming they stole a GPLed program, changed it, and then released it as their own, under their own license, and with no source code. Apparently there aren't .srpms (I think thats what source code is distributed as under RPM) available from Abit either, so unless they change that they are going to get a lot of bad press, so I don't know if they will feel like continuing to support their distribution.

If you want to use another distribution, I believe everything in Gentus is available, they just applied several kernel patches (such as support for the BP6's ATA/66 controllers), and made a few small changes. The program for monitoring temperatures is called BP6mon, and is available from freshmeat here, Gentus is here, and the discussion about Gentus and the GPL is at the other site and also on Gentus' message boards here. If you try a search for 'BP6 Linux' on Google, you will also find several discussions about the BP6 and making it work with Linux.
Nick Tamm nick-k5@echorequest.net http://www.nicktamm.org
[ Parent ]

Re: Are there any temperature sensor ty... (4.00 / 1) (#34)
by fluffy grue on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 02:10:13 PM EST

Look into lm-sensors. It's a very simple kernel module which adds a few easily-parsed files into /proc for keeping track of all the motherboard monitors, and there's a few frontends for it (including a few AfterStep and Gnome dockapps and the like).
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]
[ Parent ]

Re: Are there any temperature sensor ty... (none / 0) (#35)
by fluffy grue on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 02:12:12 PM EST

Arg, what I meant to say was it's a very simple-to-use kernel module (the module itself isn't simple, and is actually somewhat difficult to configure at first). Serves me right for not checking my mental pipelines and such. :)
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]
[ Parent ]

Re: System monitors for 'Nix (3.00 / 1) (#43)
by schvin on Sun Apr 30, 2000 at 06:30:29 PM EST

Hmm...well xosview is nice, but on a production system top or systat -vm (FreeBSD...) are superb.

meesa want 'monitor' ported.... (none / 0) (#53)
by otis wildflower on Mon May 01, 2000 at 06:49:04 PM EST

... from AIX! monitor is a more comprehensive 'dashboard'-style tool, and it's OSS IIRC.. It consolidates top's functionality with disk/net/serial IO very nicely. One of the few things I miss really badly from AIX... And after the 7 or 8 years it's been available, I guess its code is too AIX-specific to port usefully very far.. :p

Cheers,
- Otis
[root@usmc.mil /]# chmod a+x /bin/laden
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