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Bribing students to attend social events?

By fief in News
Fri May 05, 2000 at 07:48:03 PM EST
Tags: Culture (all tags)
Culture

William Woods University of MO, U.S.A. will begin offering financial aid ($5,000) to those students who collect enough points for having attended various events (such as recitals).

The New York Times has an article: College Offers Incentive to Log Off. NPR's All Things Considered has a RealAudio extert talking about it here


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Liberal Arts colleges usually strive to expand the horizons and interests of their students by providing free or cheap events to attend on campus. Should a University do more than just provide the events? Is going so far as to bribe them acceptable? Shouldn't students attend the event because they want to?

The NY Times article implies (through its headline) that the reason students aren't attending events is because they are sitting at home on their computer. Is this why students aren't going to things on campus? Or is it because students are apathetic are just don't care?

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Bribing students to attend social events? | 24 comments (24 topical, editorial, 0 hidden)
When I was in college, all we had w... (4.00 / 1) (#1)
by rusty on Fri May 05, 2000 at 12:23:58 PM EST

rusty voted 1 on this story.

When I was in college, all we had was shell access on an AIX box, and that was it until dorm ethernet finally came in my last year. And I still didn't go to social events much. I might have if it was for money though... I agree that students should be getting out and learning about the world, but is a reward system the right way to go?

____
Not the real rusty

I can certainly agree that a signif... (none / 0) (#12)
by Rasputin on Fri May 05, 2000 at 12:51:09 PM EST

Rasputin voted 1 on this story.

I can certainly agree that a significant number of Uni grads need more exposure to the world around them ;) I suspect, however, that paying them to get a life is not the best option. If the Uni's offered cultural events that appealed to the students, rather than the types of things the professors were forced to endure, this wouldn't be such a problem. Realistically (using the article's example) how many 18 to 25 year olds would you expect to attend a harp recittal?
Even if you win the rat race, you're still a rat.

No one will go to anything, "just b... (none / 0) (#2)
by bmetzler on Fri May 05, 2000 at 12:55:25 PM EST

bmetzler voted 1 on this story.

No one will go to anything, "just because". Sure, you'll get a few people who'll go to events just because they want to. But for everyone you have to promote the events. This is just one way of doing so.


www.bmetzler.org - it's not just a personal weblog, it's so much more.
It's kind of sad, really. But whos... (3.00 / 1) (#6)
by marlowe on Fri May 05, 2000 at 12:58:13 PM EST

marlowe voted -1 on this story.

It's kind of sad, really. But whose problem is it? Rounding down from -0.5
-- The Americans are the Jews of the 21st century. Only we won't go as quietly to the gas chambers. --

Blah, it's just generic finger poin... (none / 0) (#13)
by MadDreamer on Fri May 05, 2000 at 02:18:48 PM EST

MadDreamer voted 0 on this story.

Blah, it's just generic finger pointing.

IMHO, it's better than the long-hel... (none / 0) (#14)
by leshert on Fri May 05, 2000 at 02:39:02 PM EST

leshert voted 1 on this story.

IMHO, it's better than the long-held standard of _forcing_ students to attend certain events as a requirement to be a student, period.

Of course it's acceptable :) Those ... (none / 0) (#9)
by soulhuntre on Fri May 05, 2000 at 02:59:18 PM EST

soulhuntre voted 1 on this story.

Of course it's acceptable :) Those students who need the help are welcome to it!

I don't think this is a good idea. ... (3.50 / 2) (#5)
by evro on Fri May 05, 2000 at 03:17:18 PM EST

evro voted 1 on this story.

I don't think this is a good idea. I don't go to recitals because I don't like chamber music, and I don't really think bribing students to attend them will accomplish much. What purpose is served if some kids go to a hall and take a nap for a paycheck? There are speakers I'd like to see that visit my campus but I usually don't learn that they're here until they're gone. And even when there are things I'd like to attend, I really just don't have the time. Like, next week, Sam Broder, CMO and VP of Celera Genomics, is going to be talking about cloning and how Celera beat the government's genome project. But next week I have 2 midterms and 2 projects due; so that talk will have to be passed up. But I really have no desire to see Latin American chamber music, or some lady playing piano with some guy and a cello; I would consider it a sort of hell to have to sit through that.
---
"Asking me who to follow -- don't ask me, I don't know!"

Re: I don't think this is a good idea. ... (none / 0) (#18)
by dieman on Fri May 05, 2000 at 10:30:26 PM EST

Celera didn't 'beat' anyone yet. They only 'sequenced' as in, they know the building blocks, but they just dont look like anything yet.
---
blah
[ Parent ]
Re: I don't think this is a good idea. ... (none / 0) (#19)
by evro on Sat May 06, 2000 at 12:20:35 AM EST

Yeah, I wasn't sure how to say it. Take a look at the description on the <a href="http://www.dartmouth.edu/cgi-bin/cgiwrap/calendar/cal?format=long&EVENT_ID=4836@www.dartmouth.edu">calendar webpage:
Dr. Sam Broder of Celera Genomics will speak on the private sector's success in beating the government to become the first to successfully clone the entire human genome. Lecture from 6-7. Refreshments provided. Originally submitted by: Timothy B. Neuschwander

Apparently, now they've successfully cloned people!
---
"Asking me who to follow -- don't ask me, I don't know!"
[ Parent ]

Getting paid to go to events. Wher... (none / 0) (#4)
by Strider on Fri May 05, 2000 at 03:43:15 PM EST

Strider voted 1 on this story.

Getting paid to go to events. Where do I sign up? At most concerts you have to pay to get in... I'm all for getting paid to go!
---
"it's like having gravity suddenly replaced by cheez-whiz" - rusty

Wow. ... (none / 0) (#8)
by enthalpyX on Fri May 05, 2000 at 03:45:25 PM EST

enthalpyX voted 1 on this story.

Wow.

Actually, it looks like the same concept is floating into college life. I can't count the number of times some teacher of mine with way too much school spirit will offer FOO extra credit points, just for attending the latest all-important soccer or football game.

But how sad. In high school, it's always created the illusion of school spirit in the masses, when really only the jocks or people who actually play sports care about school events.

Either way, students (high school OR college) should only go to extracurricular activities because they want to. They should go because their soul is in them - in that wonderful intangible why-don't-you-understand me sort of mystical sense.

Just my nearly comprehensible $.02

Re: Wow. ... (none / 0) (#17)
by Demona on Fri May 05, 2000 at 10:15:25 PM EST

Reminds me of the "community dinner" I attended hosted by a local radio DJ -- his forced banter was literally worse than nothing. When people spontaneously get together of their own volition, you can tell the difference, from informal 'street theater' to fighting fires. The tolerant Christian view traditionally holds that one may only come to Christ of their own free will, in the same way that most folks of a libertarian bent, myself included, believe that 'charity' can only have any meaning if it is truly uncoerced (and the desires to help people, cooperate and communicate with them are not 'coercion' in any meaningful sense of the word no matter what Miss Rand's numerous self-admitted psychological problems, which make my own look pretty darn tame by comparison).

By the same token, I believe that social interaction is of more value when people are doing what they want to do, rather than what others want. Now most 'schooling' is involuntary due to the mandatory attendance laws, whereas college is voluntary. Family expectations are not analagous to true coercion; parents may withhold privileges, but that's a far cry from true force majeure (imprisonment, physical assault and the like) and the child is free to leave at pretty much any age past puberty given sufficient mental independence. Life at college can be many things, but I think most of us would agree that like the rest of life, it should be a learning experience first and foremost, and I don't think one's tendencies towards isolation, or the degree to which one 'shares' oneself with the rest of the world, should be a considering factor in determining the status of an education. This might be considered a sort of preliminary step in that direction by the academic Powahs that Be, or merely a somewhat clumsy attempt at Makin' Things Right; and perhaps it'll get a few things off the ground that become 'real', so to speak. But you know, I just can't help thinking of the old tradition of arranged marriages...

-dj

ramblin' gal/guy

[ Parent ]

OT: wassup enthalpyX (none / 0) (#21)
by joeyo on Sat May 06, 2000 at 03:03:27 PM EST

Hey man, glad to see you found your way to K5. I almost didn't recognize you but for your .sig

/joeyo

--
"Give me enough variables to work with, and I can probably do away with the notion of human free will." -- demi
[ Parent ]

Too much culture not enough tech... (none / 0) (#11)
by DemiGodez on Fri May 05, 2000 at 04:19:40 PM EST

DemiGodez voted -1 on this story.

Too much culture not enough tech

Should be an interesting discussion... (none / 0) (#10)
by adric on Fri May 05, 2000 at 05:27:19 PM EST

adric voted 1 on this story.

Should be an interesting discussion...

lame but fitting for kuro5hin... (1.00 / 1) (#3)
by davidu on Fri May 05, 2000 at 06:05:10 PM EST

davidu voted 1 on this story.

lame but fitting for kuro5hin

students are apathetic as everyone ... (none / 0) (#7)
by djzoot on Fri May 05, 2000 at 06:34:56 PM EST

djzoot voted 0 on this story.

students are apathetic as everyone is ... this gets my 0 because it seems a non issue. long have campus recruiters known that free pizza got them more interviews, various on-campus events have long proclaimed free BEvERages and whathaveyou ... the entire world seems to want to link recreational computing (or anything new-ish for that matter) to what folks perceive as even the most minor of the world's ills ... this is silly and the NYT article's headline has very little to do with its actaul story.
--
There is no K5.

Re: students are apathetic as everyone ... (none / 0) (#16)
by jetpack on Fri May 05, 2000 at 10:00:41 PM EST

The BEvERage comment makes me think you are from UBC ... do you remember BZZR, too? :)
--
/* The beatings will continue until morale improves */
[ Parent ]
Re: students are apathetic as everyone ... (none / 0) (#22)
by djzoot on Sat May 06, 2000 at 08:14:58 PM EST

nope ... caltech ... *ducking the beatings*
--
There is no K5.
[ Parent ]
Re: students are apathetic as everyone ... (none / 0) (#24)
by jetpack on Sun May 14, 2000 at 09:40:59 PM EST

heh, i have no problem with caltech; good school. just didnt realize the use of "BEvERage" was so wide spread. It's an urban legend at UBC that you cant put "beer" on advertisements, hence the various re-spellings of the word.
--
/* The beatings will continue until morale improves */
[ Parent ]
It's bribery, but it is also incent... (none / 0) (#15)
by DrNyckô on Fri May 05, 2000 at 07:43:23 PM EST

DrNyckô voted 0 on this story.

It's bribery, but it is also incentive at the same time as well. I'm guessing the university's reputation is hinging on the participation of students. I wouldn't mind $5000 US off my tuition, but I'm assuming that tuition must be a bitch.
Sue me for anything that may seem stupid... I am new and trying to settle in (if you can say).

Re: Bribing students to attend social events? (none / 0) (#20)
by inspire on Sat May 06, 2000 at 01:12:29 AM EST

Sounds like a good idea.

I have often gone to concerts/events that I would never have gone to if someone hadnt dragged me along, but ended up enjoying it. Sometimes all you need to break some of your preconceived ideas about stuff like classical music is a bit of forced exposure :)
--
What is the helix?

This is Sick, Sick, Sick!!! (none / 0) (#23)
by Anonymous Hero on Sun May 07, 2000 at 04:49:17 PM EST

The article says they consolidated small scholarships to pay for it... so, instead of giving a small scholarship to a needful student, they will pay joe blow to sit in a recital hall?

Also, the school cited a "renowned harpist" drawing only twelve attendees.... I'm not saying the harp isn't a beautiful musical instrument, but it's not like the student population is nuts because there weren't a hundred in attendance!!

FURTHERMORE! (almost done:) what exactly does the school hope to do with this? If my school offered this you know i'd go to the dumb events, but I'd probably sleep or play games for most stuff, only rarely watching *IF* it was *actually* interesting to *me*. If they want to give the impression that the students are brimming with school spirit, maybe they should concentrate that money on events the students would actually WANT to go to in the first place... then they wouldn't have to pay 'em off to sit in a murky auditorium, thinking about how dumb their administration is and what pranks they'll be able to fund with that 5 grand.

In any sufficiently large group of people, most are idiots.

Bribing students to attend social events? | 24 comments (24 topical, 0 editorial, 0 hidden)
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