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Weird Terrain and More Volcanoes on Io

By feline in News
Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 01:19:58 PM EST
Tags: Science (all tags)
Science

Old Galileo is at it again. Flybys of Io in February reveal strange textures and more volcanos with some odd behavior on the surface of the surface of the inner-most Jovian satellites, Io (aka, hell).

Read On


Comparing hi-res images from last October, November and February shows that the volcanos on Io turn from red-hot (so to speak) to cool-blue during the period of a few weeks (sort of like volcanoes on earth, except not as red-hot and a much longer period of time).

The latest images from the flyby of Galileo have also shown fourteen volcanos in an area where it was thought were only 4. The area of Io seems pretty-much the same over it's surface, and this area of fourteen volcanos covers about 5 percent of Io, so it can be estimated that there are about three-hundred (280, if you do the math, but it said 300 in the jpl press release, so that's what I'm saying).

Loki, the most powerful known volcano in our solar system was scanned by Galileo's radiometer/photopolarimeter during one an 'eruption' period and it seems that its caldera (depression in the center of a volcano) was covered with lava for four and a half months. The caldera of Loki is four thousand miles, about the size of half of Massachusetts.

Another observation shows a caldera with 'bright whits deposits' containing purer sulfur dioxide than anywhere else on Io.

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Weird Terrain and More Volcanoes on Io | 19 comments (19 topical, editorial, 0 hidden)
Some wicked eye candy here and some... (none / 0) (#6)
by marm on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 03:39:01 AM EST

marm voted 1 on this story.

Some wicked eye candy here and some good extra-terrestrial geology... kudos to JPL for building and running such a successful space probe. :)

Of course, if you're going to talk about the Jovian moons, you can't help but mention Europa. My own personal view is that we ought to be aiming for a probe landing on Europa to investigate the possibility of life on this icy, watery world. But such a probe would necessarily be quite expensive even the cheapest of the recent Mars missions was up in the region of $100 million.

Given that we have so many problems to deal with here on Earth, is it worth it, even if it is the best chance of extra-terrestrial life in our solar system? A couple of hundred million dollars is not huge, but neither is it chickenfeed - how many kids' books could you buy with that? How many lives could you save?
Worth thinking about, anyway...

Re: Some wicked eye candy here and some... (none / 0) (#9)
by Alhazred on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 02:12:47 PM EST

$100 million is zip for the United States. The DoD spends upwards of $50 million PER HOUR, day in day out, 365 days a year.

A 1% cut in defense spending, even a 10% cut if it was intelligently managed, would have absolutely no impact on US security.
That is not dead which may eternal lie And with strange aeons death itself may die.
[ Parent ]
Re: Some wicked eye candy here and some... (none / 0) (#16)
by CodeWright on Fri Jun 02, 2000 at 08:34:22 AM EST

Beans. Did you know that the US started dropping bomb casings filled with cement during the European Conquest^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H Kosovo Conflict? Because they couldn't afford real munitions anymore.

Why not make a cut in the $600 billion welfare budget instead? I'd rather pay taxes to be defended than to have some schmo be able to sit at home and collect unemployment.



--
A: Because it destroys the flow of conversation.
Q: Why is top posting dumb? --clover_kicker

[ Parent ]
Where the money goes (none / 0) (#10)
by error 404 on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 04:48:31 PM EST

The money doesn't go to space. It goes to NASA employees and contractors on-planet. It thrashes the economy a bit, but the money goes right back into the economy.

And in the process, it gets stuff to put in those books and maybe inspires a kid or two to read them. The technology developed in the course of earlier space projects has been reused in many ways, some of which have saved quite a few lives. The tech that comes out of the more automated missions probably won't be quite so life-saving (you learn a lot about how the human organism works and how to keep it working when you study how to put it in space without killing it, not so much when you study how to put a 'bot up there) but still worthwhile.

The actual resource consumption for a spaceship is relatively minor. How many hours of B-52 flight does $100M buy, and how much stuff gets converted from valuable resource to pollution in the process?



..................................
Electrical banana is bound to be the very next phase
- Donovan

[ Parent ]
Re: Some wicked eye candy here and some... (none / 0) (#12)
by Dr.Dubious DDQ on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 05:21:21 PM EST

Of course, if you're going to talk about the Jovian moons, you can't help but mention Europa. My own personal view is that we ought to be aiming for a probe landing on Europa to investigate the possibility of life on this icy, watery world. But such a probe would necessarily be quite expensive even the cheapest of the recent Mars missions was up in the region of $100 million.

I concur completely with all but the "quite expensive" part of this.
Personally, I think it's almost certain that there are at least simple microbes growing somewhere besides our particular corner of the solar system, but it'd be REALLY nice to get actual confirmation.

In the scheme of things, $100 million is chump change to our free-spending government here in the US. How many millions of dollars has been wasted so that Clinton could play "Missile Command" with Bosnia (and badly at that!)? If our government HAD to waste that kind of money, I'd much rather they'd used it to fund the hypothetical Europa probe, or something similar instead.
"Given the pace of technology, I propose we leave math to the machines and go play outside." -- Calvin
[ Parent ]
Re: Some wicked eye candy here and some... (none / 0) (#14)
by FlinkDelDinky on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 05:46:18 PM EST

Actually, I consider this raw research. Raw research is done, economically speaking, with the belief that an as yet unkown value will be discovered and made useful to human kind. And over time that seems to be a valid belief.

Research to develop particular knowledge is risky because whatever you want may not be possible or to expensive. Raw research is often valuble because it's purely for discovering new knowledge, which can be leverage for new or existing products and processes.

I'm still uncomfortable with raw research because it seams unlikely private enterprise can afford to do it. Government sponsorship wrankles my Libertarian nature. I think of it as a kind of conquest, which would put it in the domain of government. That's really stretching though.

[ Parent ]

Io is my favourite Jupiter moon.... (none / 0) (#4)
by inspire on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 06:14:52 AM EST

inspire voted 1 on this story.

Io is my favourite Jupiter moon.
--
What is the helix?

Re: Io is my favourite Jupiter moon.... (none / 0) (#13)
by Field Marshall Stack on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 05:38:58 PM EST

Oh come on, how could you like nasty old Io more than Europa? Europa's blue, Europa's got water ice, Europa's the best chance for life in the solar system outside of earth, and you like the Land o' Sulphur over it? Bah! Did Thomas Dolby ever write a song about Io? Did he? DID HE?! Didn't think so! :)
--
Ben Allen, hiway@speakeasy.org
"Nobody ever lends money to a man with a sense of humor"
-Peter Tork
[ Parent ]
Astronomy is cool, especially when ... (none / 0) (#2)
by pwhysall on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 08:20:39 AM EST

pwhysall voted 1 on this story.

Astronomy is cool, especially when there is plenty of MLP to lots of nice pictures... :)
--
Peter
K5 Editors
I'm going to wager that the story keeps getting dumped because it is a steaming pile of badly formatted fool-meme.
CheeseBurgerBrown

Amazing that Galileo is still funct... (none / 0) (#1)
by Pelorat on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 09:25:58 AM EST

Pelorat voted 1 on this story.

Amazing that Galileo is still functioning.. I thought they'd have ended its missions by now. Very neat stuff!

Interesting but not much to discuss... (none / 0) (#5)
by DemiGodez on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 11:04:11 AM EST

DemiGodez voted 0 on this story.

Interesting but not much to discuss.

This is cool but somewhat off-topic... (1.00 / 2) (#7)
by Paul Crowley on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 11:21:03 AM EST

Paul Crowley voted -1 on this story.

This is cool but somewhat off-topic; I think non-geek science should have to be positively mind-blowing before it gets posted myself.
--
Paul Crowley aka ciphergoth. Crypto and sex politics. Diary.

Re: This is cool but somewhat off-topic... (none / 0) (#8)
by feline on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 01:34:48 PM EST

there was nothing in the moderation queue, and I do think it's pretty nifty.
------------------------------------------

'Hello sir, you don't look like someone who satisfies his wife.'
[ Parent ]

Re: This is cool but somewhat off-topic... (none / 0) (#11)
by FlinkDelDinky on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 05:19:10 PM EST

No, this is not off topic. If he'd written an article about some titty bar it still wouldn't have been off topic. It's either good enough or not. That's all.

[ Parent ]
Re: This is cool but somewhat off-topic... (none / 0) (#15)
by Anonymous Hero on Fri Jun 02, 2000 at 12:07:29 AM EST

Non-geek? What do you call astro-geeks then? :P

[ Parent ]
So that's what "caldera" means! ... (3.00 / 1) (#3)
by HiRes on Thu Jun 01, 2000 at 11:43:41 AM EST

HiRes voted 1 on this story.

So that's what "caldera" means!

I guess a "debian" is like, some sort of rock striation then?
--
wcb
wait! before you rate, read.

Debian (none / 0) (#17)
by jabber on Fri Jun 02, 2000 at 10:40:50 AM EST

Funny.

For those who haven't heard, Debian is named for Deb and Ian, the people responsible for the distro.

Now, about that "Red Hat"... Is that a White-Hat vs Black-Hat thing, or is it a veiled reference to Carmen Santiago?

[TINK5C] |"Is K5 my kapusta intellectual teddy bear?"| "Yes"
[ Parent ]

Re: Debian (none / 0) (#18)
by rusty on Fri Jun 02, 2000 at 01:54:14 PM EST

Red Hat is actually named after a Cornell Lacrosse cap that belonged to either Bob Young or MArk Ewing's father or grandfather, and happened to be sitting around in his closet when they were trying to name the company. It wasn't the snazzy fedoras they use on the logo though, just a baseball cap.

____
Not the real rusty
[ Parent ]
Ever worked in defense??? (1.00 / 1) (#19)
by Alhazred on Fri Jun 02, 2000 at 02:13:49 PM EST

At least welfare money gets spent by people on necessities. Most of what we spend our defense money on is Bull Hockey!

The DoD runs out of ammo because they spend most of their money on building useless crap like the Seawolf program, or the B2 bomber instead of on training, readiness, etc. The US Defense Department is still stuck in the mode of building a military geared to fighting World War II all over again. This is absurd! Every dollar spent on defense is a dollar totally wasted from an economic perspective, and when 60 to 70% of the defense budget goes to line the pockets of contractors and ends up giving us worthless junk...

We could cut the defense budget by MORE THAN HALF and still have a military that would have been able to fullfill every mission assigned to it since the 2nd WW and done it better than it has been done. Defense spending is a criminal waste, and even those who believe in a strong defense would throw up their hands in disgust and stop paying their taxes if they had any idea what is really going on. Luckily for the Military Industrial Complex very few people give a rat's patooty, instead the public satisfies itself with consuming mindless jargon .

In short I think your observation is extremely nieve.
That is not dead which may eternal lie And with strange aeons death itself may die.
Weird Terrain and More Volcanoes on Io | 19 comments (19 topical, 0 editorial, 0 hidden)
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