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[P]
Help OpenNIC make its plans

By Arkady in News
Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 05:28:31 AM EST
Tags: Internet (all tags)
Internet

Now that the OpenNIC system is functioning, serving several new TLDs (".opennic", ".null", ".parody" and ".oss") and has even attracted some folks outside the US, we need to start considering the socialization and propagation of the project's system. I want to ask the readers here at Kuro5hin to help us plan out how the OpenNIC should move out into the wide world.


So, loyal K5 readers, here's a test of how we deal with material which does, in fact, have a promotional componant. The article below is my description of how the OpenDNS project can move into acquiring users and hopefully keeping from getting squelched by ICANN. It's not intended to promote OpenNIC, of course, though it does. It's a description of things I think an alternative DNS project can do to develop into something globally useful. I wrote it both for this posting and for the OpenNIC discussion list, so up to 8 of us may have seen it elsewhere, so it's not even unique to K5. With all those potential "-" attributes, the reason I'm posting this here is that the OpenNIC grew out of a discussion here on K5 and I'd very much like to see what you folks can find wrong with this proposal and how you think it could be improved.

It is, I think, completely correct to point to adoption and the (potential) ICANN response as the big issues for any alternative DNS project. Though we do not aim to eliminate ICANN, which would probably not be a viable objective anyway, the project is likely to be perceived as doing so. And since they currently control the name server defaults, we are in a position where we have to convince each name server admin to support us. Quite the challenge.

Getting Users

Let's look at adoption first. I see four likely paths to pursue to gain users, and if you read my first post to the OpenNIC list about this, you're definitely going to see some copy-paste going on in this part:

  • encouraging personal adoption, largely in the geek community, just because it's a nifty idea

    The geek community is quick to adopt nifty new systems. I see OpenNIC as just that. Though it's commonly known among DNS server admins to be possible, its simply a neat thing to see someone try to implement it. The neatness factor is very important in whether the geek world will adopt any new thing. Distributed systems are also nifty things, particularly when the administration or control of the system is distributed as well as its operation.

    Geeks, as a subculture, also tend to support the underdog, particularly trying to use technology to do something as they think it should be done, rather than as some corporations says it should be. By attempting to open the global DNS to direct user participation, we are placed in direct opposition to ICANN and NSI, two of the corporations (behind Microsoft) with which the geek community is most annoyed.

    The geek community, I think, can be expected to debate the project endlessly, but I also think we can expect a fairly large influx of users from the community after "announcing" the project's existence. After all, many geeks run their own DNS servers on their home networks. The standard press release is probably not a very useful tool in this community, but coverage by the major web sites is vital; the project began on Kuro5hin, after all.

    For the core online community, who can be expected to be interested in any project like this, the most important part is simply making them aware of it. The challenge here is to identify community read web sites and other media which are likely to run a story about the project. Slashdot is an obvious choice, though it might be difficult to get a posting there despite the recent coverage of ICANN. Slashdot prefers links to other media, it seems. The appropriate venues here, I think, are the more "traditional" sites which cover the Free Software/Open Source world. I'm thinking here of 2600, Boardwatch, Salon, possibly even ZD or Wired. As a young project, thus far not aligned to any "established" person or group, it will probably be difficult to get coverage in any of these. With the recent controversy where many European national TLDs went so far as to refuse to pay the ICANN levy, it should be much easier to get coverage in the European press like The Telegraph.

    Another venue for this sort of publicity, oddly enough, is humor sites, which are quite popular. I have already emailed with James Baughn, the operator of Humorix, and he has already placed a link to the site under their "Supported Projects" category. I am also discussion with Leonard Richardson, an admin of Segfault, who is interested in adding the "segfault.parody" domain for their site. Perhaps if we added ".comics" as well, we could encourage Sluggy Freelance and User Friendly to adopt the appropriate domains. This would spread the word quite far, as UF is getting over 12 million views-per-month on their site.

    And we shouldn't forget that geeks do actually control the DNS for most network entities; after all, without them who could be found who could run it? So general geek adoption could be very important in expanding support to the ISPs and other network organizations from which the vast majority of Net users get their DNS. One administrator at an ISP could easily bring thousands of users simply by changing their company's config.

  • encouraging ISC and the Free Software and Open Source Operating System distribution maintainers to change the defaults in their distributions

    The fact that ICANN controls the default root servers for every DNS server distribution can initially be approached most effectively by working to convince the ISC, who control the BIND distribution, to modify their installation to either make our system the default or to at least give the user the choice between systems at install time. I have yet to contact them about this, as I've read some rather vehement statements attributed to ISC folks at a conference this spring about BIND never supporting multiple domain hierarchies. But, as Brad Templeton pointed out to me, I haven't actually spoken to anyone there to verify that this is their attitude.

    If the ISC is unwilling to support us in their distribution, we can still work with the Free Software/Open Source operating systems to either change the defaults for their distributions or, if they're not willing to do that, to at least add an option in their installation. Considering that the various Linux' are currently the most common server operating systems on the Net, the potential increase in the user base just from OS upgrades is remarkable. And OpenBSD has been making an amazing showing in both new adopters and in media coverage (not that they don't deserve it; they do).

    Essentially, the free operating systems still dominate the Net server population. We should have a natural ally in the folks who produce these distributions and their support would also bring in not only many of the folks who run their OSs, but also all the users who receive DNS service from their machines.

  • involving the social activist community, because the project offers a better, more democratic, way to run the Net

    The Net has really started to gain popularity amongst traditional activist groups, as anyone who watched the organization building for last December's events in Seattle or this April's events in D.C. can attest. This community is also a natural ally, as the anti-corporate movement is extremely large and broad and the issue here is exactly one of a non-accountable (and inappropriate) corporation being in control of a vital piece of Net infrastructure.

    IGC, therefore, should be interested in supporting us, as should the WELL and many other Net-activist groups who are not tied into the ICANN system (as the EFF, for example, which has not decided to oppose ICANN directly). There are quite a few publications, most notably Mother Jones but many others, from this community that have wide, educated and largely online readerships.

  • encouraging corporate adoption by asking well known corporations to sponsor (not administer) new TLDs

    This, I think, is the track most likely to gain us widespread public recognition. The idea here is that, while OpenNIC will not allow a corporation to administer a TLD (or, in fact, to become members), we would welcome them as sponsors of specific TLDs. They, simply, would provide server and network resources (and hopefully some money to compensate the TLD admins for their time), in exchange for which the would be listed as the "official" TLD sponsor. Certainly, the first few to do this would receive immense publicity.

    There are two TLDs that spring to mind as immediately useful for this. We already have ".search" as a proposed TLD, though it has not been taken up by an admin team. We could ask Yahoo, Google or Jeeves to sponsor the TLD, which would get them immense press coverage (primarily beneficial to them, of course, since their business rest on brand awareness). The other is ".music", for which Beatnik, eMusic and many others have been suggested as appropriate sponsors. And, of course, we hope to involve the Free Software Foundation as sponsors for ".gnu", though if they choose not to we will naturally not publish that TLD.

Dealing with ICANN

Once the OpenNIC starts to gain users, it is quite like that ICANN will perceive it as a threat and take some action to shut us down. That would, of course, be a Bad Thing. The difficulty, being outside the current organization, is that we cannot predict how they will respond. Here are some things we can do to prepare:

  • Officially request the endorsement and support of such organizations as the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility, the Center for Democracy and Technology, The American Civil Liberties Union; the list could go on forever.

    Aside from the boost to perceived legitimacy in such an endorsement, many of these groups do pro bono legal work for threatened Net activists, which might come in really handy ... ;-)

  • Establish relationships with the registrars of other, existing, TLDs.

    There is always strength in numbers and, besides AlterNIC, many national TLD registrars are already fed up with ICANN. This seems to be mostly because ICANN derives its legitimacy as DNS controller entirely from an endorsement by the American government, and many think that this is not sufficient cause to let them control a global infrastructure. The OpenNIC is, at the moment, mostly in America (hell, right now it's mostly SF Area) but we have started to get servers in other countries. We need to seriously pursue this, not only to establish our credibility with the non-American registrars, but also to protect the system from the risk of an American injunction bringing it down.

  • We need to incorporate widely.

    The OpenNIC will initially, since I'll be putting up the money, be incorporating as a consumer cooperative in California. This is the best way to guarantee that the users keep ownership of the system. As soon as we can get admins in other countries, we should be incorporating OpenNICs in they're countries and building the organization as an unbreakable partnership between these corporations.

    Considering the financial resources controlled by ICANN, and the expectation that they will perceive OpenNIC as a threat should we gain a sufficient userbase, we really should put some legal work into shielding ourselves and our project from the possibility that they will try some legal challenge. Though U.S. courts have ruled that American trademark law cannot be applied to TLDs (see the case about establishing ".web", for example), that doesn't mean they will necessarily follow that to its logical conclusion.

    The thing here is that Disney, Coke, Nike and such have put a lot of money into building a legal system in which certain structures of incorporation become immune to any single government's pressure by simply moving their activities around the globe. We can, potentially, take advantage of this system to keep the OpenNIC DNS unencumbered by inappropriate nationalist interference by seeing that our infrastructure is as widespread as possible. This is what you might call a worst-case scenario response, since I certainly hope it would not come to having to shift the Tier 0 server to Sealand, for example.

  • Join ICANN.

    I, personally, have registered as an ICANN "At-Large" member and (unless someone else in OpenNIC decides to run; I'm not really that interested; I just think it would help if one of us were) will be nominating myself for the election next month to fill the five "At-Large" slots on the ICANN Board of Directors. I encourage all of you to register to vote in that election as well. If we can get people with aligning interests onto ICANN's Board, even though it would not be a majority, it could be enough to bring them to cooperate with us, or at least to keep them from suing us ... ;-)

Discuss?

So, that's where I think the real issues are in building up a genuine alternative to ICANN. The discussion on K5 was immensely helpful in designing the system itself and thinking about what it should be and do. Can you folks contribute something to help us get it done? Then, thanks. ;-)

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Display: Sort:
Help OpenNIC make its plans | 25 comments (24 topical, 1 editorial, 0 hidden)
So Rusty... (3.70 / 3) (#2)
by fluffy grue on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 05:27:35 AM EST

Are you going to create a .K5 TLD so that the different mythical sections can have their own domain? news.k5, sports.k5, recipes.k5, etc.? :)
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]

HaHa (3.00 / 2) (#3)
by Anonymous Hero on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 06:24:35 AM EST

Very funny :P

-- Ender, Duke_of_URL

[ Parent ]
Re: So Rusty... (none / 0) (#7)
by Arkady on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 12:59:01 PM EST

Good one. ;-) Rusty did register an OpenNIC name under .null, but I don't think it was for K5.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
AlterNIC vs. OpenNIC (5.00 / 1) (#4)
by Anonymous Hero on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 06:32:04 AM EST

What's the difference between these two? Obviously ones been around a lot longer.

Any chance of merging?

Are any of the OpenNIC TLDs in possible conflict with other system's TLDs?

What about getting other TLD proponents (.god, .dot, .biz, etc) to hook into OpenNIC? Has anything been done about looking into that?

And who's writing software that'll ease adoption for this - like Mozilla patches, etc... (ie: stuff I can hand to my grandma)

-- Ender, Duke_of_URL

Hooking in... (none / 0) (#5)
by Anonymous Hero on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 06:50:09 AM EST

Should minimally consist of a list of TLDs on your website, with another (DNS registrar) color behind them. So people can hunt for the TLD they want. Who registers .god again? .dot?

Etc.

And what's it take to run a TLD? I'd like to run one, just for conceptual reasons...

-- Ender, Duke_of_URL

[ Parent ]
Re: Hooking in... (none / 0) (#10)
by Arkady on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 01:44:35 PM EST

The current policies are at http://www.unrated.net/projects/opendns/tlds.html. Hop on in!

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
I've got a better list, still needs help (none / 0) (#26)
by Anonymous Hero on Wed Jul 19, 2000 at 02:03:09 AM EST

http://www.public.asu.edu/~ender/Projects/Indexes/alt.dns-organized

[ Parent ]
Re: AlterNIC vs. OpenNIC (reformatted again, damn! (none / 0) (#13)
by Arkady on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 01:57:04 PM EST

> What's the difference between these two? Obviously ones been around a lot longer.

AlterNIC is a for-profit company, so merging is out of the question. One of the main points of the OpenNIC is that the users should own the system.

> Any chance of merging?

We are, however, interested in cooperating with them. They are listed as pre-existing TLDs which we will respect as we set up new ones on the TLD policies page.

> Are any of the OpenNIC TLDs in possible conflict with other system's TLDs?

Not to our knowledge. If you know of anyone who was publishing a TLD before June 1 of this year, please let us know. That's the date before which we've decided to respect anything which was then operating.

> What about getting other TLD proponents (.god, .dot, .biz, etc) to hook into OpenNIC? Has anything been done about looking into that?

That'd be great. What we're aiming towards is a system where any group can, by agreeing to respect each other TLD publisher and put forth the necessary equipment, become a TLD publisher themselves. There's some discussio of this issue on the new TLDs page I linked to above.

> And who's writing software that'll ease adoption for this - like Mozilla patches, etc... (ie: stuff I can hand to my grandma)

You don't need any special software. There are instruction on the site for how DNS admins can support it and, for users, if your network's DNS server supports it you do to. End-users can also point themselves directly at an OpenNIC Tier 2 name server for DNS resolution *if their network admin refuses to support it) by changing an entry in their TCP config.


Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
How are you going to assure... (none / 0) (#6)
by karjala on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 11:01:08 AM EST

How would you assure us that once OpenNIC becomes the standard, you will not take arbitrary decisions that adversely affect us all, driven by self-interest and greed?

Re: How are you going to assure... (5.00 / 1) (#9)
by Arkady on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 01:43:28 PM EST

Heh. That's really this issue, isn't it? That's why it's going to be legally a consumer cooperative. A consumer coop is, basically, a business owned by its customers. I envision it as organized something like this. There would be three categories of members, which are called User, Administrator and Maintainer on the OpenNIC site right now. These categories determine the topics on which members can vote, since each category, as they get more specific, have different interests and expertise in the system. Users (anyone who uses the OpenNIC DNS system) vote on general policies, the creation of new TLDs and budgeting the organization's resources. Any decision made by the other categories can be appealed to a vote of the general usership. Administrators (anyone running an OpenDNS name server) are expected to have some expertise in DNS and to have an interest in how the global system is run. They vote on issues of (generally technical) organization with which general Users cannot be expected to have expertise, as well as on general User issues. Maintainers (the folks who operate the OpenNIC core and TLDs) are expected to be the most involved and experienced category of members. They vote on issues controlling the operation of the Tier 0 and Tier 1 servers and on the more general User and Administrator issues. This design should prevent any person or group within the organization from achieving a position where they can force arbitrary or personally greedy decisions on the system, particularly since any decision by any person or group can be appealed up to the general usership for a vote. This system, of course, won't be implemented completely untill we get some decent crypto/voting software on the Net, but it's the structure the group is aiming for.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
Re: How are you going to assure... (reformatted re (none / 0) (#11)
by Arkady on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 01:47:28 PM EST

Heh.

That's really this issue, isn't it?

That's why it's going to be legally a consumer cooperative. A consumer coop is, basically, a business owned by its customers. I envision it as organized something like this. There would be three categories of members, which are called User, Administrator and Maintainer on the OpenNIC site right now. These categories determine the topics on which members can vote, since each category, as they get more specific, have different interests and expertise in the system.

Users (anyone who uses the OpenNIC DNS system) vote on general policies, the creation of new TLDs and budgeting the organization's resources. Any decision made by the other categories can be appealed to a vote of the general usership.

Administrators (anyone running an OpenDNS name server) are expected to have some expertise in DNS and to have an interest in how the global system is run. They vote on issues of (generally technical) organization with which general Users cannot be expected to have expertise, as well as on general User issues.

Maintainers (the folks who operate the OpenNIC core and TLDs) are expected to be the most involved and experienced category of members. They vote on issues controlling the operation of the Tier 0 and Tier 1 servers and on the more general User and Administrator issues.

This design should prevent any person or group within the organization from achieving a position where they can force arbitrary or personally greedy decisions on the system, particularly since any decision by any person or group can be appealed up to the general usership for a vote. This system, of course, won't be implemented completely untill we get some decent crypto/voting software on the Net, but it's the structure the group is aiming for

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
Important question... (none / 0) (#8)
by KindBud on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 01:25:38 PM EST

I wonder how disputes would be resolved.

Perhaps by moderation, a la Usenet?

Or perhaps all contributing members get a vote in such matters? Say Mr. Scumbag camps out on slashdot.null, and Andover.net disputes his rights to that name. They put up a call for votes. If some majority (simple, 2/3?) agrees, slashdot.null is yanked. It might be better if the winning party is not givin the disputed domain directly, so as no to create incentives to harass people, but to put it on hold for a period of time before making it available again. Perhaps the party initiating the vote would not be eligible to take control over the disputed domain at all, but would need to convince some quorum of independent sponsors to call for votes on their behalf instead...

I don't know, I'm just rambling ideas off the top of my head.

While we're at it, is there any reason not to allow anyone to create a new top level (actually 2nd level, since "." is the top level :) in this system? This might be workable with a Usenet-style voting model.

In fact, I think there is much to recommend the Usenet model to DNS domain hierarchies.

--
just roll a fatty

Re: Important question... (none / 0) (#14)
by Arkady on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 02:05:52 PM EST

Disputes are resolved by vote, in an ascending model of appeals. For your example, slashdot.null (though they wouldn't be able to register in .null, since they're a commercial corporation, both of which are forbiddeen in .null, but we'll ignore that for an example ;-):

The person who thinks (s)he has a better claim to the name would first contact the current domain holder and discuss it. If they could not com to an agreement, they would contact abuse@null (an address all domains are required to maintain). The abuse maintainer would contact both parties requesting their suggestions for a solution. If it looks like they can compromise, that's the next step. Otherwise, the abuse contact would place the issue up for ballot by all OpenNIC members holding domains in the .null TLD. That ballot decides the issue.

Either party in the conflict could then appeal that vote to abuse@opennic, who's contact would arrange the issue to be placed in a general OpenNIC ballot. There is no appeal from a general ballot.

TLDs need to be approved by the group to be created, but anyone who can come up with a good TLD and make the commitment in time and resources to run it is welcome to propose a new one.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
Instructions on the homepage? (4.00 / 1) (#15)
by Stormbringer on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 05:45:28 PM EST

"You don't need any special software. There are instruction on the site for how DNS admins can support it and, for users, if your network's DNS server supports it you do to. End-users can also point themselves directly at an OpenNIC Tier 2 name server for DNS resolution *if their network admin refuses to support it) by changing an entry in their TCP config."

I didn't see them, and I did some looking.

You need prominently linked instructions for every level of computer user on how to plug into this system -- instant gratification counts high in mass acceptance issues.
You need someone with the requisite writing skills to sit down and write how-to-plug-in articles for the major *nix zines/rags such as Linux Journal and rootprompt, specifically including the print mags. Some folks don't spend much time searching out new on-topic websites; they don't have time. That particularly applies to mainframers.
A more technical discussion of what it is, how it works, how to plug in and why it's a Good Thing and it Doesn't Break Anything should go to SysAdmin magazine. Somewhere in the O'Reilly nexus there's gotta be a correct place for an article to be sent with much the same coverage but with more emphasis on the natural-evolution-of-open-systems side of the issue.
A Mini HOW-TO should be sent to LDP.

When some of those are accomplished and you're ready to Meet The Press, I suggest you email Dan Gillmor at the San Jose Mercury and Mike Magee at The Register, and write up a promo blurb for Linux PR via linuxtoday... and figure out what you want to do about ZD -- you really want those people to have your choice of words ready to hand when this surfaces, so they don't have to make up their own. Ditto the ComputerWorld/InfoWorld type of publication. You should have a contact person clearly listed for those folks, someone who has facts at their fingertips and a friendly, knowledgeable and persuasive (and non-fanatical) style; some of those folks will want to call back to get clarifications and additional copy for their stories, so your spokesperson should have a good telephone style (and good availability). If you manage to recruit someone in marketing to do this, great, as long as they know the tech stuff too. As much as possible, you should have made sure that anybody who wants to plug in can easily find out how to do so, by this time.

The big guys will want to see that you've got servers they can count on, and big pipes to get there, so the sooner you get sign-on from nameservers close to the backbone, the better. Maybe some of the current alternate registrars (register.com etc) will be receptive if approached?

My thoughts on the matter, anyway :) I think this is great, and btw thanks for doing it.



Re: Instructions on the homepage? (none / 0) (#17)
by Arkady on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 06:51:30 PM EST

Hmmm. OK, so the project site is a bit alternative in design; the actual OpenNIC site I'm working on is better ... ;-)

The info on setting your DNS server to use our data is on http://www.unrated.net/projects/opendns/using.html.

You have some excellent suggestion in your comment, by the way. Thanks.


Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
Expand user base by creating alternate country top (none / 0) (#16)
by Incognegro on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 06:42:12 PM EST

A great way to expand the reach of OpenNIC (geography wise) would be to consider creating alternate top-level country domains. For example, current top-level domains for countries are .us .uk .ng .gh etc.

What would be nice would be longer top-level names such as .united-states, .united-kingdom, .ghana etc. A key point for expansion of OpenNIC would be to go around monopolies (everyone's favourite topic) which are typically the country level domain administrators. For Ghana, that would be Network Computer Systems - which is an ISP as well as the sole domain registrar.

My point is that an alternate system is needed in many places all over the world and this could expand the relevance of OpenNIC. However, I think ICANN will shut this down ASAP.

What are the implications of a successful alternate Domain Name System ? Can you say fragmentation of the Internet ?
-- I choose not to have a signature. I choose to be anonymous. I choose not to be recognizable except by my own authority. Don't you choose to be in control of yourself ?

Re: Expand user base by creating alternate country (none / 0) (#18)
by Arkady on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 06:54:33 PM EST

The alternative country TLD idea is interesting; we hadn't considered that at all. I think we could pull it off, but we'd need people from those countries to take the responsibility for each; or possibly it'd be better to have each country TLD administered from another country, to protect it from interference?

Do you have any thoughts on ways ICANN could try to shut us down? We really do need to prepare for some sort of response (like the fact that they declared that they're launching new TLDs today, even though they said last week that they wouldn't discuss that at this meeting), but I can't think of anything we could be accused of doing that's illegal.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
Re: Expand user base by creating alternate country (none / 0) (#19)
by Incognegro on Sun Jul 16, 2000 at 08:35:34 PM EST

Putting administration of country level domains from another country is probably the best approach. The master server should be outside the country in question and the actual server in each country would merely be a slave. That way, the master is out of reach of being shut down and that is what really matters IMHO.

Also hard-coding the OpenDNS into mozilla would go a long way towards getting it in widespread use :-)
-- I choose not to have a signature. I choose to be anonymous. I choose not to be recognizable except by my own authority. Don't you choose to be in control of yourself ?
[ Parent ]

Re: Expand user base by creating alternate country (none / 0) (#25)
by Tr3534 on Tue Jul 18, 2000 at 04:59:49 AM EST

>Also hard-coding the OpenDNS into mozilla would go a long way
>towards getting it in widespread use :-)

That would not help with other applications, unless you made it tamper with the registry/resolve.conf or whatever. To get total dns converage is the idea, not just 1 commenly used application.

Sigmentation Fault: Post Dumped.
[ Parent ]
iDNS (none / 0) (#20)
by Anonymous Hero on Mon Jul 17, 2000 at 09:10:09 AM EST

You should contact the people at iDNS. The are extending the DNS with Unicode. That means more choice for TLDs.

Re: iDNS (none / 0) (#24)
by Anonymous Hero on Mon Jul 17, 2000 at 11:33:50 PM EST

I thought iDNS was a scam?

iDNS very quickly sold a large number of domains in Asia, some time back, and nothing much seems to have happened since. I've never actually seen any of these domains in use. My reading was that it was a scam to grab some quick cash from lots of speculators, which I think it did.

Unicode DNS would be a fine thing, though. Its a pity the brain dead design of the name system treats UC and LC alike. The UTF-5 coding used by iDNS is an awful bodge to work around that.



[ Parent ]
TLD's in other countries (none / 0) (#21)
by IcI on Mon Jul 17, 2000 at 07:33:41 PM EST

http://co.za has a comprehensive list of alternative TLD's for South Africa. Problem is, I've never seen http://www.capetown.city.za but there is capetown.co.za
As you said, get the geeks to use it to build the initial wave and the momentum will then carry itself until something better comes along.
<pre> oo oo
BIG Brother is watching
\\ \/ /\ //
OO OO OO OO OO OO OO OO cc dd
</pre>
need search engines (none / 0) (#22)
by climer on Mon Jul 17, 2000 at 10:52:45 PM EST

To suceed you will need search engines to spider your TLDs. I suggest grabbing some open source spiders as can be found on freshmeat.net and setting up a search engine.

It might be nice to have search engines that searched only the .oss tld and therefore was actually the kind of "spider"/target you wanted to find. search for "open source spider" on google to see what I mean

Without search engines Alternic has been a waste. Don't let that happen to OpenNic.

/Duncan

Re: need search engines (none / 0) (#23)
by Arkady on Mon Jul 17, 2000 at 11:13:43 PM EST

Having spiders restricted by TLD, so you could build an index _guaranteed_ to contain only Open Source (or whatever the TLD is restricted to) project files is an excellent idea! You'd just have to go to "www.search.oss" and viola!

Thanks. I'll definitely pass that one on.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
Help OpenNIC make its plans | 25 comments (24 topical, 1 editorial, 0 hidden)
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