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Canadian Border Crackdown May Keep Bush from Trade Summit

By kellan in News
Mon Apr 23, 2001 at 06:23:22 PM EST
Tags: Politics (all tags)
Politics

QUEBEC CITY -- Tough new enforcement of immigration laws at the Canadian border in preparation for FTAA summit, is having some surprising consquences.


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Canadian Border Crackdown May Keep Bush from Trade Summit
Jennifer C. Berkshire
Global Press Service
Quebec City, Canada

QUEBEC CITY -- Tough new enforcement of immigration laws at the Canadian border has prompted concern that President George W. Bush may have trouble entering the country for the Summit of the Americas, scheduled to begin on Friday.

In preparation for the Summit, authorities have implemented unprecedented security precautions at the border, including checking the arrest records of every entrant into Canada. Now, say some officials, those measures may even be extended to Summit participants including George W. Bush.

`We are looking for any history of criminal activity, any evidence that a certain individual may be harmful to himself or the Canadian people,`said Francois de Rigaud, an immigration official in Quebec.

Yesterday, border police at the Derby crossing in Vermont refused entrance to a prominent New England labor leader, on the grounds that he had been arrested during a Vietnam-era protest in 1971.

The exclusion of the labor official, who was to have participated in an international pre-Summit meeting starting last night, has triggered speculation that President Bush himself may have difficulty crossing the border, due to a conviction for drunken driving in 1976.

`We`re obviously concerned,`said one Republican party leader close to the President. `We weren`t aware that the Canadians were going to be checking records.

Ąsked earlier this year about the DUI arrest, President Bush expressed sorrow over the incident. ``I regret drinking while intoxicated,`` he said, ``but I was never under anybody`s influence at the time.``

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Canadian Border Crackdown May Keep Bush from Trade Summit | 35 comments (24 topical, 11 editorial, 0 hidden)
I don't know who should be more embarassed... (4.00 / 5) (#3)
by WinPimp2K on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 11:03:25 AM EST

The US or Canada, but it sure is emabarassing :)
Canada for denying entry to someone arrested for civil disobedience 30 years ago (during a time when Canada was a popular "alternate destination" for Americans otherwise likely to go to Southeast Asia.
The US for having a President with a history of "youthful indiscretions" involving mind altering substances.
At least Bill Clinton wouldn't have to worry about his youthful indiscretions since Slick Willie did:
  1. Not smoke dope
  2. Not violate the laws of the US (being in another country at the time)
  3. well ok, took a toke, but idn't inhale
Sometimes ya just gotta laugh to keep from crying.

Slick Willie (2.60 / 5) (#14)
by MrAcheson on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 01:16:08 PM EST

Yeah, I can't believe the US elected a president who doesn't even know how to smoke a joint right...


These opinions do not represent those of the US Army, DoD, or US Government.


[ Parent ]
Good Golly (1.50 / 2) (#16)
by weirdling on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 01:25:51 PM EST

There is strong evidence Slick Willie did crack while president.
Point number two is correct as long as you are careful to include the (being in another country at the time) because he sure broke a lot of laws while in *this* country.
Probably Carter is the last president that didn't do any drugs.
<br>I'm not doing this again; last time no one believed it.<br>

[ Parent ]
strong strong evidence (1.00 / 1) (#29)
by khallow on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 12:22:55 PM EST

There is strong evidence Slick Willie did crack while president.

There is strong evidence that you did crack while writing that post. After all, there's strong evidence that nothing happens in Washington, DC.


Stating the obvious since 1969.
[ Parent ]

"Youthful"? (4.25 / 4) (#4)
by Lelon on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 11:07:52 AM EST

Ok, its not called "youthfull indiscrition" when you're 35 years old. Oh, and by the way, after GW Busch was arrested for drunk driving, he bravely decided to stop drinking 10 years later. What a guy.


----
This sig is a work in progress.
This is dumb (2.00 / 4) (#5)
by Kinthelt on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 11:12:32 AM EST

has triggered speculation

Assuming the C&P is a real copy, that has to be one of the stupidest things I've ever heard. It doesn't matter if Bush has a criminal record, he's still going to be allowed to enter Canada. Otherwise, what the f^&k is the point of the summit?

Speculate away, but keep it intelligent.

we're only thinking of bush's best interests (3.00 / 2) (#8)
by eLuddite on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 11:27:38 AM EST

that has to be one of the stupidest things I've ever heard. It doesn't matter if Bush has a criminal record, he's still going to be allowed to enter Canada.

You can be kept out of the USA if you have a criminal record. If Bush was allowed into Canada, how would he ever return home, eh? Ever think of that?

---
God hates human rights.
[ Parent ]

Although I live in Canada, (4.00 / 1) (#9)
by eLuddite on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 11:31:54 AM EST

and cannot legally enter the US, I did not mean to write 'eh.'

---
God hates human rights.
[ Parent ]

re: You can be kept out of the USA if you have a c (4.00 / 2) (#12)
by Ratnik on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 11:52:49 AM EST

Only if you are a non-citizen.

[ Parent ]
oh, you're no fun at all (3.00 / 2) (#23)
by eLuddite on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 06:32:50 PM EST

What is worse? That he not enter, or that he enter under escort to a bail hearing?

---
God hates human rights.
[ Parent ]

You Don't Have to Look... (4.33 / 6) (#7)
by greyrat on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 11:24:02 AM EST

... at his criminal record to find "any evidence that a certain individual may be harmful to himself or the Canadian people". His political record is enough. At least it is in 'merica.

"The great object is, that every man be armed. Every one who is able may have a gun." -- Patrick Henry


~ ~ ~
Did I actually read the article? No. No I didn't.
"Watch out for me nobbystyles, Gromit!"

Like they'd keep him out. (4.14 / 7) (#13)
by YellowBook on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 12:49:05 PM EST

Like another poster said, they're going to let him in, or what would be the point of the summit? George W. Bush could be a serial killer and they'd still let him into Canada. Oh, wait... he is!



Sorry, man (3.00 / 5) (#15)
by weirdling on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 01:22:07 PM EST

The rest of the country simply doesn't understand that it is the Texas Penal Board, not the governor, who decides who gets executed. Without using a direct pardon, and thus circumventing the law, then Governor Bush did not have the power to modify the system, and one of the things I like about Bush is that he follows the law, unlike Clinton...
<br>I'm not doing this again; last time no one believed it.<br>

[ Parent ]
aw shucks (4.33 / 3) (#20)
by dr k on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 04:10:44 PM EST

I don't think Bush needs an apologist, he set out to kill convicts with plenty of gusto. This didn't happen:

Penal board: Betty Lou Beets, we sentence you to death.
George Jr: Wait, you can't kill her, she's a grandmother!

Though perhaps you are writing a book on this remarkable man and have information not available to the rest of us?
Destroy all trusted users!
[ Parent ]

But this could have happened... (1.00 / 2) (#21)
by weirdling on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 05:14:21 PM EST

Penal board: Betty Lou Beets, we sentence you to death.
George Jr: Wait, you can't kill her, she's a grandmother!

Texas constituents at next election: vote the sucker out.
I guess what most of America and indeed, the rest of the world, doesn't understand is that it's not as if the governor himself creates the laws and forces their execution; even Ann Richards had people executed. Texas just believes firmly in capitol punishment, and whether you're a pitiable figure or not, if you did the crime, you get to pay the penalty. That they execute so many shouldn't be surprising; Texas is huge. As far as I know, they are the biggest state with a death penalty still.
I believe firmly in the death penalty myself, but what is more important is that GW did *not* circumvent the law like Clinton did, pardoning willy-nilly for whatever reason. The law is enacted to be enforced, and that is *all* the executive branch *can* do, constitutionally, which is something the Clinton administration continually forgot, using administrative order to further policies Congress refused to enact. Give me law-and-order Bush any day.
<br>I'm not doing this again; last time no one believed it.<br>

[ Parent ]
politics (4.66 / 3) (#24)
by dr k on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 09:00:44 PM EST

You have a poor grasp of the American political system if you think power is solely derived from the law.

George Jr. could have done a number of things to keep the execution tally down: granted clemency, asked for commuted sentences, ask for a moratorium on execution, ask for new legislation to be proposed. But he didn't, because he wanted to break the record for executions in one year.

As for pardons, I think George Sr. broke that record.

But that has nothing to do with Canada.
Destroy all trusted users!
[ Parent ]

Proper roles (2.00 / 1) (#26)
by davidduncanscott on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 10:21:58 PM EST

Of course he could have done all those things, but none of them were his job as Governor. Legislators pass laws, judges and juries try cases and pass sentences, and executives carry them out. He had the power to intervene in extraordinary cases, but simply to decide that death penalty cases are extraordinary would have been as arbitrary and tyrannical as imprisoning those whom the courts had cleared.

[ Parent ]
to decide (3.50 / 2) (#27)
by dr k on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 04:12:31 AM EST

...but to decide that death penalty cases are extraordinary would have been as arbitrary and tyrannical as imprisoning those whom the courts had cleared.

We have some really confused notions about human rights, don't we? God bless America.
Destroy all trusted users!
[ Parent ]

Notions (3.33 / 3) (#28)
by davidduncanscott on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 07:39:49 AM EST

As it happens, I don't like the death penalty, and that would be one reason I couldn't accept the job as Governor of Texas (or Maryland, for that matter). I'm not familiar with the oath of office there, but I'm reasonably sure that it does not say, "to uphold the laws with which I agree, and frustrate those with which I don't agree".

Leadership based on personal feelings may be good leadership, but it's certainly not democratic government. The Governor is, in the old formulation, a "servant of the people", not their Dad.

You missed one powerful and appropriate statement a Governor could make -- resignation. That would be within the bounds of the job, (although it would be a little tough to explain why he accepted the position in the first place.)

[ Parent ]

LOL (2.00 / 1) (#34)
by Ian A on Mon Apr 23, 2001 at 06:34:44 PM EST

none of them were his job as Governor.
Duh, he job as governor was to wait until the right wing could get him into the White House as their puppet!
I mean, comeon, save lives?
Outside his jurisdiction!

[ Parent ]
derby crossing (3.00 / 3) (#18)
by unstable on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 02:44:37 PM EST

"Yesterday, border police at the Derby crossing in Vermont refused entrance to a prominent New England labor leader, on the grounds that he had been arrested during a Vietnam-era protest in 1971."

last time i was at derby crossing in VT it was a small building that only comercial vehicles had to stop (and i guess Gov't controled vehicles)... it even closed for the night.. somehow i doubt anyone is going to have trouble getting in to Canada, all they have to do is wait till border patrols breaktime.





Reverend Unstable
all praise the almighty Bob
and be filled with slack

Or other crossings (2.00 / 1) (#35)
by themessage on Tue Apr 24, 2001 at 12:29:35 AM EST

Like here in North Dakota where one can just cross the border and no one is the wiser --- unless you get caught doing something bad in Canada, or go back through a regular crossing.

[ Parent ]
I just hope (4.25 / 4) (#25)
by spacejack on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 09:40:34 PM EST

the Americans let him him back in after the summit.

Nice satire (2.33 / 3) (#32)
by yertledaturtle on Fri Apr 20, 2001 at 04:47:27 AM EST

Nice satire. Also a good way to get people talking about the FTAA,(which is a secret document that affects us all).
How can there be free trade without free people?


--NO CORPORATE GLOBALIZATION WITHOUT POPULAR REPRESENTATION.

Canadian Border Crackdown May Keep Bush from Trade Summit | 35 comments (24 topical, 11 editorial, 0 hidden)
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