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[P]
Douglas Adams Dies At Age 49

By Eloquence in News
Sat May 12, 2001 at 11:46:52 AM EST
Tags: Culture (all tags)
Culture

Douglas Adams, author of many popular books (LOC listing), including The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (a series in five parts) and Last Chance to See (a report about endangered animals), has passed away. As the BBC reports, he has suddenly died of a heart attack at age 49. Douglas Adams leaves his wife Jane Belson and daughter Polly. In recent years, he had been working on a movie version of HGTTG. Adams has also created the H2G2 community, a "real-life" version of the Hitchhiker's Guide.


The Hitchhiker's Guide has sold more than 14 million copies world-wide and is an immortal sci-fi classic. It is a book about hapless earthling Arthur Dent and his alien friend Ford who hitchhike through the universe as Earth was destroyed to make way for a hyperspatial express route. In his books, Adams has created the "Babelfish", a fish that translates everything when you plug it into your ear, the "improbability drive" ("a wonderful new method of crossing vast interstellar distances in a mere nothingth of a second, without all that tedious mucking about in hyperspace"), the "Total Perspective Vortex" (which shows you how small and unimportant you really are by revealing the true size of the universe), and, of course, Vogon Poetry. In memory of Mr. Adams, here's an excerpt:

Oh frettled gruntbuggly
thy micturations are to me
As plurdled gabbleblotchits on a lurgid bee.
Groop I implore thee
my foonting turlingdromes.
And hooptiously drangle me with crinkly bindlewurdles,
Or I will rend thee in the gobberwarts with my blurglecruncheon, see if I don't!

Of course, the book also answers the question of life, the universe, and everything. A radio play of HGTTG was aired on the BBC in the seventies, and the audio version is always worth listening to (although it differs from the books in many respects). There was also a TV version, and perhaps the movie that Adams has been working on in the last years will also be finished.

HGTTG was also the inspiration to one of Adams' more recent projects, H2G2, a community not unlike Everything2. H2G2 attempts to be a complete encyclopaedia. Users can create entries for "Life", "The Universe", and "Everything". The UI is somewhat bloated and javascripty, but the basic concepts are pretty well-implemented.

"The Guide" puts a lot of emphasis on write-up quality. But it doesn't rely on the arbitrary actions of editors to remove content, it relies on the arbitrary actions of editors to optimize and mark quality-content (only if you agree, of course). Noise-nodes are still available but can easily be filtered.

Douglas Adams was also a man who cared a lot about the fate of our planet. In Last Chance to See, Mr. Adams reported in vivid detail and with lots of dry British humor about the animal kingdom and species which may no longer roam the Earth in a few years from now, like the Komodo Dragon, the White Rhinos of Zaire, and the Yangtze river dolphins.

Douglas Adams was an atheist, but he will be immortal in our minds, as long as we remember all the laughter and wisdom that he has brought us. And if he has uttered any last words, I hope they were the same as those of Marvin, the paranoid android: "I think I feel good about it." And then the lights went out in his eyes for absolutely the very last time ever.

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Douglas Adams Dies At Age 49 | 104 comments (100 topical, 4 editorial, 0 hidden)
Douglas' books (4.53 / 13) (#2)
by Eloquence on Sat May 12, 2001 at 07:43:37 AM EST

Here are some prepared Amazon links for those who don't know HGTTG or Douglas' other books.

HGTTG 1: The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
HGTTG 2: The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
HGTTG 3: Life, the Universe and Everything
HGTTG 4: So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish
HGTTG 5: Mostly Harmless
Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency / The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul
Last Chance to See

Don't tell anyone, but all of them have been scanned and proofread, and I hear that Mr. Adams was not a particular friend of copyright himself. There are also MP3s of the existing audiobooks.
--
Copyright law is bad: infoAnarchy Pleasure is good: Origins of Violence
spread the word!

Death of a cultural icon (4.76 / 13) (#4)
by itsbruce on Sat May 12, 2001 at 08:14:13 AM EST

With HGTTG he provided the source for more Geek humour, jargon and cultural terms of reference than anybody apart from Monty Python.

I'm not sure which is more scary/tragic: that he died so young or that it's so long since he wrote anything good. Not that you could call him a one-book author or a one-idea man. HGTTG was such an incredible burst of creative energy that it's hardly surprising he never repeated it. Nothing he did afterwards was ever boring and he provided some anti-MS/pro-Mac advocacy that was far more insightful, original and considered than the usual fare.

I have a boxed set of audio cassettes of the original BBC radio series, the only time my parents really judged a Christmas present right. If I had to leave quickly with only the contents of a rucksack, that'd be in it.

Oh dear, I really am quite upset about this. I'm not an SF "fan" - I find fannish behaviour pretty pathetic, frankly, and I usually don't bother to find out much about the authors. The books/stories themselves are enough. But HGTTG is special and so was Douglas Adams.


--I unfortunately do not know how to turn cheese into gold.

Don't forget Dirk Gently (4.20 / 5) (#12)
by spiv on Sat May 12, 2001 at 10:21:36 AM EST

HGTTG was such an incredible burst of creative energy that it's hardly surprising he never repeated it

Some people don't like the Dirk Gently stuff as much, but I quite enjoyed The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul and especially Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency. In fact I have audio tapes of the latter, spoken by Mr Adams -- very enjoyable.

Certainly, as you said, he was not a "one-book author or a one-idea man".

-Spiv



[ Parent ]
Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective agency. (none / 0) (#103)
by labradore on Mon Jul 08, 2002 at 09:18:44 PM EST

I have this in audiotape format and I am almost afraid that it is incomplete. It ended with Dirk going back in time to prevent a poet from writing "The Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner" and somehow that was going to prevent the destruction of the human race. Do you have any insight that explains what really happens?

[ Parent ]
Why he quit writing books (4.60 / 5) (#16)
by dennis on Sat May 12, 2001 at 11:45:43 AM EST

I saw Adams speak a couple years ago. He was as funny in person as in print, and had more insight into the nature of computers and the Internet than just about anyone I've come across.

He said he wrote for ten years, and realized he wasn't having any fun. He started out in radio, working with a bunch of people, having a blast pulling it together. Then wrote a book, and another book, they got big, he kept writing books. But after a while he found he was tired of being in a little room by himself all day, he wanted to work with people again.

[ Parent ]

I always preferred the Radio version (4.00 / 4) (#20)
by itsbruce on Sat May 12, 2001 at 12:29:44 PM EST

IMO the books were padded out with all the jokes he'd rejected while writing the radio scripts.


--I unfortunately do not know how to turn cheese into gold.
[ Parent ]

He put himself in his books (5.00 / 1) (#40)
by John Milton on Sat May 12, 2001 at 07:40:11 PM EST

Remember Arthur Dent worked in radio too. Maybe Adams made us care so much about his characters, because he never tried to romanticise them. He made you feel like they were close friends. It's sad to hear of his passing. That bit about the white lab mice always cracked a smile on my face.


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
nevertheless (3.40 / 5) (#66)
by streetlawyer on Mon May 14, 2001 at 07:20:08 AM EST

With HGTTG he provided the source for more Geek humour, jargon and cultural terms of reference than anybody apart from Monty Python.

However, he can scarcely be blamed for this, and in most other aspects of his life he was a force for good.

--
Just because things have been nonergodic so far, doesn't mean that they'll be nonergodic forever
[ Parent ]

"Oh no, not again." (4.46 / 13) (#6)
by driph on Sat May 12, 2001 at 08:35:32 AM EST

Wow. I am stunned and saddened. Thank you for the informative writeup, Eloquence. Very well done.

I've loaned out my bound 4 volume set of the complete(at the time) HGTTG series more times than I can count. In fact, the book is currently on loan. Easily my favorite series by any author. I don't know what to say.

So long, Mr. Adams, and thanks for all the fish. :[

--
Vegas isn't a liberal stronghold. It's the place where the rich and powerful gamble away their company's pension fund and strangle call girls in their hotel rooms. - Psycho Dave

Bittersweet. (4.20 / 15) (#7)
by driph on Sat May 12, 2001 at 08:50:37 AM EST

The score of this story at last reload.

--
Vegas isn't a liberal stronghold. It's the place where the rich and powerful gamble away their company's pension fund and strangle call girls in their hotel rooms. - Psycho Dave
[ Parent ]
seriously tho (1.88 / 9) (#8)
by enterfornone on Sat May 12, 2001 at 09:00:27 AM EST

see sig

--
efn 26/m/syd
Will sponsor new accounts for porn.
[ Parent ]
Wow... (3.40 / 5) (#23)
by CaptainZornchugger on Sat May 12, 2001 at 01:18:13 PM EST

You really are stuck on yourself, aren't you?

(yeah, yeah, I know, collective cry of "you're just now realizing this??", but I guess I haven't been paying attention.)


Look at that chord structure. There's sadness in that chord structure.
[ Parent ]
Re: Wow... (1.00 / 6) (#51)
by enterfornone on Sun May 13, 2001 at 01:22:54 AM EST

There is no Wanker Cabal
So it's just you?

--
efn 26/m/syd
Will sponsor new accounts for porn.
[ Parent ]
Thanks (5.00 / 2) (#25)
by Luke Francl on Sat May 12, 2001 at 01:40:48 PM EST

I missed this story in the queue and it floored me when I read it :(

I thought it must be a joke or something...

But I saved your image, because it's a bittersweet reminder of how much Douglas Adams changed our culture (and not just for geeks, either).

Thanks.

[ Parent ]
Nuggets of truth (5.00 / 1) (#55)
by Wah on Sun May 13, 2001 at 02:08:35 PM EST

Rating of parent comment at last reload.

(4.20 / 10)

Here's to all the lab janitors that solve impossible problems!
--
Some things, bandwidth can't buy. For everything else, there's Real Life | SSP
[ Parent ]

This is the first weblog obituary that I really (3.60 / 10) (#9)
by ZanThrax on Sat May 12, 2001 at 09:23:37 AM EST

give a damn about. Adams' is one of very few people who's work had any real emotional effect on me. (True, it was a humourous effect, but still.) I am saddened to hear of this.

 
When you don't feel like thinking, quote!


That's what I loved, the emotion (5.00 / 2) (#33)
by John Milton on Sat May 12, 2001 at 02:41:40 PM EST

That's what made people like Heinlein and Bradbury famous. They put emotion in their works while the other sci-fi writers wacked off to their technology. Douglas had more than a humourous effect on me. I loved all of his characters. Most people remember the humourous stuff, but how did you feel when Marvin closed his eyes for the last time? It takes a real genious to play on your heart strings.

I saw one post saying that it was sad that he never wrote anything else. Well he wasn't really a writer to begin with. He wrote the radio transcripts first IIRC, and then he wrote the book. Besides, does it really matter that he went on to do other things. Can anyone ever take away from what he did. If I live a thousand years, I would consider myself honoured to say as much about humanity as he has. I doubt many any of the members of kuro5hin could claim to have affected even half of the people he has.

I only wish he hadn't killed all of the characters in the last book. I was really dissappointed about that. It sort of reminds me of Conan Doyle killing off Holmes, because he was tired of him.


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
One suggestion (1.08 / 97) (#10)
by darthaya on Sat May 12, 2001 at 09:55:59 AM EST

Can't you post it under www.important-people-who-just-died.org instead of kuro5hin? I dont see why it can generate any kind of valuable discussions whatsoever.

Many people voted this piece of shit up because it is "eloquently" done? oh come on, do you guys all marry beautiful women (or beautiful men) just because they "look" good? Where is the substance?

Why not ? (3.33 / 9) (#11)
by mami on Sat May 12, 2001 at 10:13:13 AM EST

Why not a MLP section for deceased men which had an impact to many of the K5 or computing community ?

Aren't there always new people who want to learn and want to know about them ? I have been pointed to many good books through /. , K5 and other lists, which I would have otherwise not found or thought about looking after.



[ Parent ]
Section: News, Topic: Culture (4.63 / 11) (#13)
by spiv on Sat May 12, 2001 at 10:32:32 AM EST

It's been submitted under News/Culture. I'd say this is both newsworthy and culturally significant.

As for discussion, for this is a discussion site, I would think there is plenty of opportunity for discussion. You can discuss the effect of his work on your life, the significance of him to "our" (whoever that might be) culture, or simply fondly remember him and his works. And I see no harm in giving people an outlet for their grief by allowing them to discuss it on K5.

On the other hand, you could judge it all to be a load of sentimental crap, and vote accordingly.

As usual, I suspect the truth is somewhere in between. I don't expect a sudden out-pouring of high-quality literary criticism, or profound tales of life transformation. But I still enjoy reading others' opinions and thoughts on this subject.

-Spiv.



[ Parent ]
Think much? (4.23 / 17) (#15)
by communista on Sat May 12, 2001 at 11:33:02 AM EST

I know that his death didn't matter to you, so please just vote accordingly and think before you type. A Kuro5hin member wrote this, so clearly they were interested - And people are voting this up, so others appear to be interested as well. The last that I recall, this wasn't slashdot and people generally wrote about things that interested them (Not necessarily being tech all the time, mind you!) - So at this point, the runes have been cast and we will await the fate of this story.

I understand your opinion but I think you might have wanted to invest a little more thought into your words before posting. What you've written makes me think that you might start a picket line at a graveyard, angry at the people for paying respect to the deceased.
---

The three most dangerous things are a programmer with a soldering iron, a manager who codes, and a user who gets ideas.

-Communista
[ Parent ]
We'll all make a deal with you (4.46 / 13) (#22)
by RangerBob on Sat May 12, 2001 at 12:56:59 PM EST

When your long night comes, we all promise not to give a shit when you pass on.... (Yes, this post peeved me greatly)

He's contributed something to society and culture, so we care about him. If you don't, that's fine, but attacking the story about it is nothing more than the usual "I'm insignificant so I'm going to attack those that are" posting.

[ Parent ]
He's not worth the reply. (4.66 / 6) (#38)
by John Milton on Sat May 12, 2001 at 07:12:56 PM EST

You wasted precious words on him. A simple Fuck You would have sufficed, and it would have summed up everyone elses thoughts. Some people don't give a rats ass about anyone else. They just want to see more fight the man articles. Don't waste time on them, but I gave him a 0 if it makes you feel better.


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
comment types (4.33 / 3) (#29)
by Delirium on Sat May 12, 2001 at 01:47:12 PM EST

Use editorial comments for editorializing please... =]

[ Parent ]
wow... (2.75 / 4) (#74)
by SvnLyrBrto on Mon May 14, 2001 at 12:46:34 PM EST

It truely baffles me that some people think that this shithead deserves a 5.

You, sir, are a contemptable piece of filth; unworthy of membership in the human race.

john

Imagine all the people...
[ Parent ]

not exactly (3.50 / 2) (#86)
by ODiV on Tue May 15, 2001 at 12:18:19 PM EST

I was thinking of rating this a 5. Not because I want it to be at 5, but because I think it should be at 1.


--
[ odiv.net ]
[ Parent ]
I think it's amazing... (4.00 / 2) (#87)
by Crashnbur on Tue May 15, 2001 at 08:15:59 PM EST

...that (a) a comment can be rated at an overall overage less than 1 and (b) that a comment can be rated over 90 times.

Wow, you can stir the people... I'm guessing you didn't mean to, though.

crash.neotope.com


[ Parent ]
Re-rating you cause you pissed Communista off (none / 0) (#97)
by Sheepdot on Thu May 17, 2001 at 01:37:46 AM EST

I'll give it a 5 to stir up some more emotional 0's.


[ Parent ]
So long (4.78 / 14) (#14)
by finial on Sat May 12, 2001 at 11:11:35 AM EST

Back in 1979, I saw a small ad in Rolling Stone magazine that said something like "write for a free advanced reading copy of an exciting new novel" or some such marketing drivel. But hey, it was a free book. No strings attached.

A while later came an advanced reading copy of HHGTTG. I still have the book. It has gotten a little brittle and yellow with age, but I still have it. And the insert that came with it.

I won't say that the book changed my life or anything, but it was unlike anything I had ever read. I grabbed each of the books in the trilogy as they arrived. I bought the book of radio scripts and the plays on LP (ancient technology we listened to before CDs). I've collected the tapes of the BBC-TV show, and the MP3s of the twelve radio episodes. The only other series I've enjoyed as much as this is Aristead Maupin's Tales of the City [1] [2] although they didn't translate nearly as well into any other medium.

The true measure of the importance, or at least endurance, of a book (or anything else for that matter) is whether it adds anything to the lexicon. Who doesn't know what a Catch 22 is? It's the same with "42" and "Don't Panic."

It's a shame he's gone, but he left a good legacy.



Amen (4.50 / 4) (#17)
by Erbo on Sat May 12, 2001 at 12:13:05 PM EST

I received the first two books as a Christmas present one year. One day, I finally got around to reading them...and laughed myself silly. I now have all the books, the radio scripts book, the original records (on tape someplace), Neil Gaiman's excellent companion book Don't Panic, the Infocom game...pretty much everything except the official towel.

It's pretty safe to say that my perception of things like towels, white mice, and the number 42 will never be the same again.

Christ, what a thing to wake up to this morning. At least he died in Santa Barbara, a city that was my home for 13 years, and my wife's for longer than that. It's a beautiful place (expensive though).

But, as long as the fruits of his intellect and keen sense of humor are still with us, he will never be truly gone. I predict that, a thousand years from now, people will still be reading Hitchhiker's...and, when they encounter it for the first time, they'll probably laugh themselves silly, too.

Eric
--
Electric Minds - virtual community since 1996. http://www.electricminds.org
[ Parent ]

Thanks for all the fish (4.16 / 12) (#18)
by onyxruby on Sat May 12, 2001 at 12:17:32 PM EST

One of my favorite authors of all time. His ability to shake your thinking whilst being rather unserious was rather unique. Great humor, perspective and who else could get away with putting 5 books in a trilogy? On top of that, as the author pointed out, he created the Babelfish. This of course inspired the online Babelfish. When I was in school some friends and I even made a one act play out of one his books, (it went over quite well with the audience).

The moon is covered with the results of astronomical odds.

What a mindblower... (4.11 / 9) (#21)
by Ming D. Merciless on Sat May 12, 2001 at 12:47:40 PM EST

...for a Saturday morning. I can't say that I have strong emotional reactions to the death of strangers very often, but when I first read about Douglas Adams' untimely demise it was as if a great gaping part of my adolescence had been ripped away. Turning to the appropriate bookshelf I am reassured that although Mr. Adams is gone, at least his creations live on.

It is pouring rain here now in upstate NY. It is the first really hard rain we have had all spring. Somehow it seems appropriate.


I'd also like to point out that Douglas Adams also worked on Doctor Who and is responsible for the excellent story arc 'City of Death.' Many elements of that episode and 'Shada' were later recycled into Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.



We apologize... (4.50 / 8) (#24)
by harb on Sat May 12, 2001 at 01:28:02 PM EST

This is a definite kick in the stomach. I first found The Guide while everyone was at my grandfather's funeral, '91. We'd cleaned out his den, which included most of his books. His copy of the Guide was already well-worn and by the time I was done with it a few years later, it was falling apart.

I can't think of a piece of fiction, in any format, that had as much affect on me during my high school years (and later) as the Guide.

I was disappointed that I'd never get to discuss it with my grandfather, although he'd inadvertantly introduced me to it.

Now I'm saddened that I'll never get to thank Adams for helping to shape my twisted sense of humor.


bda.

Ouch... (5.00 / 1) (#41)
by 'abstrakt on Sat May 12, 2001 at 08:19:11 PM EST

I am stunned that Adams has died so young.

Like you, I have found that Douglas Adams' creative outpourings have been woven into the experience of growing up.

May his sense of humour live on to warp more young minds.

lb.

[ Parent ]

Wait a minute... (1.03 / 32) (#26)
by GreenEagle on Sat May 12, 2001 at 01:42:16 PM EST

where did comment no. 10 go ?

it was _not_ spam

yeah, many kurobots felt offended by it, but that's why it was so fun...

to repeat, it was not an abuse of the comment system, so bring it back at once !



Abuse (3.85 / 14) (#30)
by CheSera on Sat May 12, 2001 at 02:01:43 PM EST

It may not have been abuse, but clearly most people didn't find it funny or intellegent, so it got killed. Its not coming back. Sorry, but community moderation works like that.


============
**TATDOMAW**
============

[ Parent ]
moderation (2.90 / 11) (#31)
by Osama Bin Laden on Sat May 12, 2001 at 02:25:34 PM EST

It's true that the comment isn't funny, intelligent, or in good taste, but it's also true that it isn't spam or content-free. The comment deserves a one rating, but shouldn't be hidden.

ObL

[ Parent ]

re: moderation (3.55 / 9) (#35)
by CheSera on Sat May 12, 2001 at 04:42:49 PM EST

Although I agree that it wasn't spam, it was flame-bait, and a pretty worthless excuse for a post. That wasn't even really my point though. I took issue with the apparent demand to return post #10. That is just silly. Enough people felt that the comment should be hidden so that it got killed. Simply demanding that it come back isn't going to make anything any better, and certainly won't bring it back.


============
**TATDOMAW**
============

[ Parent ]
Irony (3.20 / 5) (#102)
by puzzlingevidence on Mon May 28, 2001 at 03:57:03 PM EST

There's some serious irony in that you moderated one of my more recent comments to 0, then. It was neither spam nor content-free.

---
A man may build a throne of bayonets, but he can not sit on it. --Inge
[ Parent ]

What's worse than a whiner? A troll whiner (3.92 / 14) (#32)
by 0xdeadbeef on Sat May 12, 2001 at 02:28:55 PM EST

The only bots here are the simpleton children who think another's grief is funny.

That post is worse than spam, because at least spam has a commercial motive. Post #10 is mean-spirited shit, and exists only for those who like to play in it.

I encourage everyone to zero posts that cross the line into that level of puerile spite and immaturity.

So go back to slashdot you little twits, you are not welcome here, and you will not be heard.

[ Parent ]
The problem with that post (4.20 / 5) (#54)
by aphrael on Sun May 13, 2001 at 01:05:14 PM EST

is that there are a lot of people who agree that it shouldn't be a 0, but can't bring themselves to give it anything more than a 1. Even to balance out the pernicious hiding of the comment, I can't do that.

[ Parent ]
go ahead and give it a 5 (1.50 / 10) (#59)
by G Neric on Sun May 13, 2001 at 03:32:11 PM EST

"steering" ratings have been endorsed by the powers that be here. your commitment to free speech is sadly in keeping with the rest of K5, apparently just a bunch of free speech poseurs.

[ Parent ]
Free Speech for the Dumb. (4.00 / 6) (#60)
by CheSera on Sun May 13, 2001 at 06:13:20 PM EST

I prefer to think that my use of a 0 vote on the post was a form of free speech. I exercised my opinion that that post was a waste of space. To insure that my fellow K5'ers didn't have to put up with it I helped it on its way to oblivion. Free speech gives you the right to say what you want. Free speech (in the form of our vote) also gives us the ability to make it go away. Don't waste space with pointless flamebait. You wanna troll, go to /. .


============
**TATDOMAW**
============

[ Parent ]
little fucking nazi (1.28 / 14) (#63)
by G Neric on Mon May 14, 2001 at 02:36:35 AM EST

You are a free speech poseur: you claim to pro-free speech, but you suppress speech that you do not agree with. People like you do not deserve the freedoms that you enjoy, because you do not work to support them for others Why can't you allow a viewpoint that you don't like to be seen by others? if you don't like it, move on, but don't censor, you fascist fuck.

Is that flamebait to you? I guess the truth hurts.

[ Parent ]

Moderation isn't censorship... (3.75 / 4) (#71)
by Anonymous 6522 on Mon May 14, 2001 at 11:17:19 AM EST

...it is a way to express your opinion of the post. If you think it's crap, give it a low score, if you think it isn't, give it a high score, it's the individual's choice.

In your post, you are arguing against free speech; you don't think that people should be able to express their opinion of the comment in question.

If you don't like it move on.

[ Parent ]

au contraire (2.00 / 10) (#75)
by G Neric on Mon May 14, 2001 at 01:32:55 PM EST

but giving it zeroes hides it: that *is* censorship. I'm not complaining about a low score, I'm complaining about hiding things.

sure, hide the outright spam, but not disagreeable opinion.

[ Parent ]

nah (4.00 / 4) (#81)
by Arkady on Mon May 14, 2001 at 04:19:14 PM EST

Cencorship is an imposition of external standards onto the flow of communication in a community or forum. The moderation system here is, by definition, internal to the community and is thus merely an expression on the community's desire not to have that type of drivel here.

True censorship would prevent you from saying that sort of thing completely and that's definitely not the case, You can go to another forum to post that kind of tripe, but the community doesn't want it here. There are lots of other communities on the Net which would welcome it. It is only reasonable that a community define itself (else how can it be a community?) aand one way it dos that is through the collective creation of the social norms. On K5, that creation is done through the Mojo system and using that system a suffficient percentage of the population has expressed the opinion that comment #10 on this piece is not the sort of thing we want as part of this community.

That's fine, and is part of the operation of any community. It's not even an imposition on you or the poster, either, since there are many more forums where you could try to fit in and, failing that, it's quite simple to set up a new one. Unlike the Real World, if you don't like any of the communities on the Net, you can easily create a new one which will subscribe to your preferred norms.

The conception of censorship you're arguing is meaningless, because it makes any restriction on speech censorship and places a burden on the community to allow _every_ statement anyone wants to make. Since such a conception has no boundaries, naming it is pointless; names exist to define conceptual boundaries, and your idea of censorship denies that there are boundaries.

-robin

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
Dear Neofascist, (1.71 / 7) (#89)
by G Neric on Tue May 15, 2001 at 11:23:46 PM EST

Cencorship is an imposition of external standards onto the flow of communication in a community or forum.

quite simply, no, it's not. And the rest of what you wrote is vapid to an equal degree. Do you think the Soviet suppression of the political speech was OK because it was, let's see, what was your fascist little phrase, oh yes, "internal to the community".

The concept of censorship I am arguing has to do with you hiding ideas from other people because you object to those ideas. Why not burn books while you are at it?

[ Parent ]

Mod games (3.33 / 3) (#90)
by puzzlingevidence on Wed May 16, 2001 at 12:13:49 AM EST

Maybe you haven't been reading my diary, but I'm the master of playing mojo games here. You've apparently modded a dozen of my posts to 1 in retaliation for my modding a couple of yours to 1. Yours deserved it -- that's why dozens of people have been modding them to 1. I can retaliate, too: I've modded about 40 of yours to 1. As I've said to others before, this isn't my "primary" account. You aren't preventing me from being a trusted user. I do, however, believe in punishing the foolish. I have a script that modstorms for me. It's no effort at all to automod all of your posts to 1. Feel free to keep it up.

---
A man may build a throne of bayonets, but he can not sit on it. --Inge
[ Parent ]

STOP. (4.50 / 2) (#93)
by Crashnbur on Wed May 16, 2001 at 11:49:24 AM EST

Both of you, stop it. Mod comments based on the comments, not based on the person commenting. Let's not set standards on the people - only on the comments. Okay? I don't care if you like each other... just don't mod something to a 1 because you don't like the person. Sometimes your bitterest enemy has something genius to share, and if you ignore it just because you don't like him, you are only hurting yourself.

Just my opinion. If you disagree, don't mod it down, just argue your point. Or... mod it down. I don't control you. :-)

crash.neotope.com


[ Parent ]
Um... (3.00 / 3) (#95)
by puzzlingevidence on Wed May 16, 2001 at 04:13:22 PM EST

I have no idea who the guy is. I don't like or dislike him. He modded a whole whack of my comments in retaliation for a couple of 1s (and I wasn't the only one he did it to) so I responded with the big guns.

That's the whole story.

---
A man may build a throne of bayonets, but he can not sit on it. --Inge
[ Parent ]

I really don't approve of that little script... (4.00 / 1) (#100)
by Anonymous 6522 on Thu May 17, 2001 at 02:45:20 AM EST

...of yours. If you were really serious, you'd take the time to do it the proper way, by hand, instead of sending your halfwit automod script to do it. I mean, the darned thing can't even read what it rates!

Moderation wars are dumb; by participating, you're just encouraging more. Anyway, you claim that you only use the puzzlingevidence account to moderate, so why care what it's comments get rated as long as it isn't untrusted?

[ Parent ]

Master of Mojo Games? (5.00 / 1) (#98)
by Anonymous 6522 on Thu May 17, 2001 at 02:14:27 AM EST

I think not. :)

[ Parent ]
You're right. (3.00 / 3) (#99)
by puzzlingevidence on Thu May 17, 2001 at 02:15:25 AM EST

Mea culpa. I stand corrected. :)

---
A man may build a throne of bayonets, but he can not sit on it. --Inge
[ Parent ]

bad argument (3.00 / 2) (#96)
by Arkady on Wed May 16, 2001 at 08:19:04 PM EST

Well, you stayed vaguely on-topic so I won't rate you a 0, despite the overwhewlming temptation after you apparantly decided to start down-rating my comments. I think that's the first time anyone's done that. ;-)

That aside, though, your argument here is nothing more than name-calling. You could, for example, try to argue that the rulers of the USSR could (through whatever contruction you choose) be considered internal to the communities there. I can't think of any good points on that side, but at least it's a substantive argument against the definition I was proposing.

Name-calling, however, generally ceases to be an effective disputive technique once folks get out of the sixth grade so it's not what you'd call effective.

And burning books is a totally different issue. A book, sitting on someone else's shelf, in no way represents myself or a community in which I participate. If I think a book's contents are worthless, I don't keep a copy in my library. burning it would be pointless, since the intention isn't to limit what other people do, but rather the way in which what they do effect or reflect on me.

There's a major difference there.

-robin

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere Anarchy is loosed upon the world.


[ Parent ]
Whereas the ratings war you've started (5.00 / 2) (#94)
by itsbruce on Wed May 16, 2001 at 12:40:53 PM EST

Running around rating 1 to every comment by everybody who rated this flamefest down - that's a sign of your big-hearted passion for freedom, is it?


--I unfortunately do not know how to turn cheese into gold.
[ Parent ]

Pedant's corner (4.00 / 5) (#27)
by mattbee on Sat May 12, 2001 at 01:44:00 PM EST

The radio series was the original incarnation of the Hitch Hiker's Guide-- for a change, it was the book that came afterwards, though I think that gave him the opportunity to explore all the nooks and crevices that would have made the radio series an epic. A really sad & unexpected piece of news, though-- Pan-Galactic Gargle Blasters all round.

Odd (3.85 / 7) (#28)
by Delirium on Sat May 12, 2001 at 01:46:13 PM EST

And just yesterday I got an email from my college's graduation ceremony coordinators indicating that they had spoken with Mr. Adams yesterday (Friday) and that he confirmed he'd be arriving shortly to speak at commencement this weekend. Apparently not.

Wow. ='^( (4.28 / 7) (#34)
by Mr. Excitement on Sat May 12, 2001 at 03:17:06 PM EST

This...

This is the first time in a long time that I've ever been at a loss for words.

He taught us the Meaning of Life, he made us laugh as the Earth was destroyed, yet neither of those is much consolation right now.

*Sigh*...

The Meaning of Life (5.00 / 1) (#39)
by John Milton on Sat May 12, 2001 at 07:18:16 PM EST

42

Kilkonie I worship you. :)


"When we consider that woman are treated as property, it is degrading to women that we should Treat our children as property to be disposed of as we see fit." -Elizabeth Cady Stanton


[ Parent ]
sigh. (4.00 / 7) (#36)
by rabbit on Sat May 12, 2001 at 04:46:57 PM EST

So long, and thanks for all the fish.



-- I have desires that are not in accord with the status quo.
my thumb is still not working.... (4.00 / 5) (#37)
by univgeek on Sat May 12, 2001 at 06:40:39 PM EST

Damn and I dont have my copy of the H2G2 here with me....
Hope he has a copy with him where he's going....

*** The introduction to the 5 book set I have is particularly funny...
He gives the following ways to get off earth
1. Call NASA and explain that it is necessary for you to get off the Earth. (phone number was provided, if forgot wht it was)
If they refuse..
2. Call the Pentagon (ph no), they 'may' have some influence with the NASA.
3. Else, call the Kremlin (ph no), they too seem to have some influence with NASA.
4. Else, Call the Pope (ph no), and explain to him that it is imperative that you get off the Earth before your phone bill arrives.... :-))

So long and thanks for all the books....

Arguing with an Electrical Engineer is liking wrestling with a pig in mud, after a while you realise the pig is enjoying it!
If 42 is the answer (3.00 / 3) (#42)
by wiredog on Sat May 12, 2001 at 08:39:05 PM EST

WHAT IS THE QUESTION

The idea of a global village is wrong, it's more like a gazillion pub bars.
Phage

if you read the novels (4.50 / 2) (#50)
by typhatix on Sun May 13, 2001 at 01:13:29 AM EST

at one point he hints at it when they try to extract the question from the pattern in arthur dent's brain. the problem is the question would be slightly off due to various errors propagating (and I don't really remember, been a while). The question in Arthur's brain was "what is 6 times 9?" Take a guess at what the question is. The fun thing is, if you think about it, this does explain a whole lot about life, the universe, and everything.

[ Parent ]
hint (5.00 / 1) (#67)
by wiredog on Mon May 14, 2001 at 07:56:18 AM EST

check the number of the post...

The idea of a global village is wrong, it's more like a gazillion pub bars.
Phage
[ Parent ]

a series in five parts (3.00 / 3) (#43)
by wiredog on Sat May 12, 2001 at 08:40:46 PM EST

NO. DAMMIT! IT'S A TRILOGY!

At least, that's what it says on the cover of the books.

The idea of a global village is wrong, it's more like a gazillion pub bars.
Phage

Your statistic is off... (3.33 / 3) (#48)
by PFlats on Sat May 12, 2001 at 11:56:33 PM EST

"The average American has one breast and one testicle"

Belive me, I know a lot of people with two breats and two testicles.



--- "It's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care." - Peter Gibbons, Office Space
[ Parent ]

Sure (5.00 / 1) (#78)
by Phil the Canuck on Mon May 14, 2001 at 02:25:03 PM EST

But they average out with the people with no breasts and no testicles.

------

I don't think being an idiot comes with a pension plan though. Unless you're management of course. - hulver
[ Parent ]

Radio plays (4.85 / 7) (#44)
by finial on Sat May 12, 2001 at 09:28:32 PM EST

If you are of a mind to give a listen, the 12-part radio play is on constant rotation at Live365 and Shoutcast.

High bandwidth at Live 365:

http://www.live365.com/cgi-bin/directory.cgi?autostart=ender3k

Low bandwidth at Shoutcast:

http://www.shoutcast.com/sbin/shoutcast-playlist.pls?rn=4036&addr=209.114.200.145:8000&file=filename.pls



Thank you! (4.00 / 2) (#49)
by driph on Sun May 13, 2001 at 12:33:35 AM EST

Hey, thanks for the links... It's been a while since I'd listened to the radio plays, it's great to hear them again. Jumped in at the Restaurant at the End of the Universe, and am currently at the point where Zaphod pops out of the Vortex unscathed.

If any of you have yet to hear these, please take some time for a listen.. if you are familiar with the books, you can jump in at any point, and you'll be okay.. But if you've never read/heard the series, try to catch em from the beginning if you can.

--
Vegas isn't a liberal stronghold. It's the place where the rich and powerful gamble away their company's pension fund and strangle call girls in their hotel rooms. - Psycho Dave
[ Parent ]

Here's a beginning (4.50 / 2) (#56)
by Wah on Sun May 13, 2001 at 02:14:26 PM EST

if you're more into downloads than streams. Or games, of course.

[note: this server is probably getting hammered right now, we apologize for the inconvenience]
--
Some things, bandwidth can't buy. For everything else, there's Real Life | SSP
[ Parent ]

And for download (4.66 / 3) (#57)
by fluffy grue on Sun May 13, 2001 at 02:25:04 PM EST

Back when I ran Hobbes, I put the entire radio show up for download, complete with an episode guide if you want to seek to the exact section that you were looking for. (I didn't write it... it came with the archive.)
--
"Is not a quine" is not a quine.
I have a master's degree in science!

[ Hug Your Trikuare ]
[ Parent ]

A sad day indeed (3.66 / 3) (#45)
by Wah on Sat May 12, 2001 at 09:43:02 PM EST

like many others I ran into the books during my teenage years. My brother had them laying about and I picked one up. I haven't stopped laughing since. My 5-book trilogy has been loaned out a number of times, and well, he was just damn funny and insightful.

Anyway, I've got at least one happy thought. At least I got to say hi. (thanks /.)
--
Some things, bandwidth can't buy. For everything else, there's Real Life | SSP

The Infocom Game (4.25 / 4) (#46)
by PFlats on Sat May 12, 2001 at 10:41:49 PM EST

For those of you who haven't tried it, or even those who have and want to play again, the Infocom game is avaiable from DNA's website, in that magickal cross-platform language, Java. It's worth a few more good laughs, and is both hard and addicting.

Bear in mind that you cannot save in this version.

If you haven't read the books, do so before playing. The game is impossible without doing so. And possibly even after doing so. I know I've personally spent many, many hours playing it. At least one of which was just in the house.

It's a shame. 49 is such a young age.



--- "It's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care." - Peter Gibbons, Office Space

Infocom (4.50 / 2) (#80)
by esch on Mon May 14, 2001 at 04:07:27 PM EST

I've got the actual game, along with the WinFrotz emulator, if anyone wants the saveability. Mail me, if I get enough requests, I'll put it up somewhere. If I don't, I'll just mail it to you. It's relatively small...

[ Parent ]
Infocom (5.00 / 2) (#83)
by esch on Tue May 15, 2001 at 02:48:46 AM EST

Holy christ. I never imagined that kind of response...

Ok all you guide hungry monkeys, I've put a zip up here. Be nice, try not to /. it, eh? *ducks flying chairs* :)

[ Parent ]
Tis a sad day. (3.33 / 3) (#47)
by Rasvar on Sat May 12, 2001 at 11:45:45 PM EST

There have been very few books that i like to read over and over. Whenever I am down or just in a funk, Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy "trilogy" has always been a good pick me up.

Knowing he was working on the filme project with Disney, I find myself hoping it is now ever made. I just doubt it will come off correctly without Mr Adams at its odd looking helm.

Pick me up? (4.00 / 2) (#53)
by zakalwe on Sun May 13, 2001 at 06:10:14 AM EST

Are these the same books we're talking about?

I ususally get depressed after reading them (especially if I go up to Mostly Harmless.) I usually take the precaution of having some nice light 'literary prozac' available for afterwards whenever I decide to re-read them.

[ Parent ]

The Film (5.00 / 1) (#72)
by pallex on Mon May 14, 2001 at 12:07:54 PM EST

"Knowing he was working on the filme project with Disney"

I first heard D A mention a film version in 1984. I think he wrote about 11 scripts for it (this doesnt include reworkings!). Even had he lived to complete it, it would probably have been a `hollywood-ized` version. I would love to have seen Terry Gilliam do it. Now, however, theres just no point. I wouldnt go and see it, anyway.

Think it`s time i played the original radio series again!

[ Parent ]
Truly sad day (3.33 / 3) (#52)
by decaf_dude on Sun May 13, 2001 at 01:51:41 AM EST

Just yesterday I was talking to my girlfriend about some books and I mentioned HGTTG and she asked me to get them for her (of course I have the Trilogy, as well as Dirk Gently) - later in the evening I was watching BBC World and the anchorwoman informs us that Douglas Adams passed away earlier in the day after suffering a heart attack - age 49.

I know I'll be repeating what many people already said, and even more people thought, but I've never been so stricken by a "celebrity" death like with Adams'. I was always kinda hoping he'll grace us with some more of his incredible wit and writing uniqueness.

Good bye, Douglas Adams, you'll be sorely missed! Hope you had a good trip...

--
http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=89158&cid=7713039


Friday. (4.60 / 5) (#58)
by Crashnbur on Sun May 13, 2001 at 02:53:32 PM EST

I left Wednesday for a weekend vacation in the mountains with my best friend, my girl friend, and her family. I brought with me clothing, a portable CD player, and The Ulmate Hitchhiker's Guide, a collection of six novels/stories by Douglas Adams, including and based upon the original Hitchhiker's Guide to the Universe. I had never read the novel before, but I had very recently become quite enthralled with Adams' work. His satirical wit and overwhelming knowledge of the English language made what little of his science fiction that I knew extremely intriguing, to the point that I went out and bought his book and was looking forward very much to the new movie that I had heard he was working on.

So, Friday morning I finally found a chance to start reading, and by Saturday evening I had finished the book. After returning home, I turned on my computer for the first time in five days this morning and checked the news, and I was shocked and very disappointed to find this story among the first that I came across. I cannot express my emotions properly, for they are most likely selfish. (I didn't know the guy, but I loved his work, so is it wrong to miss a genius simply for his work? Selfish, right?)

So, looking forward to his next book, I have suddenly been hit with a reality that it will never come, and the new Hitchhiker movie may become figments of our imaginations as well. From the looks of things this morning, however, I can see that Douglas Adams will be sorely missed.

(On another note, why is it that so many of our world's geniuses (genii?) die at such a young age before they have fulfilled their potential? This seems to be a recurring theme since the 20th century...)

crash.neotope.com


the news made me think of this amusing 404 page (4.50 / 2) (#61)
by Curby on Sun May 13, 2001 at 07:24:43 PM EST

Original:
http://www.scintilla.utwente.nl/notaURL/

Mirror:
http://curby.dhs.org/cryptodocs/Mirrors/scintilla.utwente.nl.404.html

Cute page. For those who are less familiar with The Guide's characters, this page gets its inspiration forom a character in the inappropriately named 'Trilogy.' Cross the inappropriately named Marvin the Paranoid Android with Roxen and this is what you get. :)

--Curby

curby.dhs.org broken: 's/dhs/dyndns/' works (n/t) (none / 0) (#104)
by Curby on Sun Oct 13, 2002 at 08:47:00 PM EST

.

[ Parent ]
Horrible News (3.33 / 3) (#62)
by Phil the Canuck on Sun May 13, 2001 at 08:20:01 PM EST

What a terrible end to a good weekend. Mr. Adams' writing had a profound effect on me, and I just feel horrible now. A wife and such a young daughter, what a tragedy.

------

I don't think being an idiot comes with a pension plan though. Unless you're management of course. - hulver

Last words (3.33 / 3) (#64)
by Akaru on Mon May 14, 2001 at 07:06:05 AM EST

i would prefer his last words to be

"So long and thanks for all the fish"

Dammit (3.80 / 5) (#65)
by unstable on Mon May 14, 2001 at 07:18:56 AM EST

There is thousands of other people I would like to see have their name up there instead of mister Adams.... WTF is wrong with this world were someone as funny, smart, and loved as Adams gets taken away early, while certain @sshoes (fill in whom you wish) seem to live forever.

I guess Billy Joel was right in singing "Only the Good Die Young".

G-bye Douglas Adams... and thanks for all the books.





Reverend Unstable
all praise the almighty Bob
and be filled with slack

omigod (2.33 / 3) (#76)
by G Neric on Mon May 14, 2001 at 01:41:01 PM EST

the phrase "only the good die young" was around long before Billy Joel.

[ Parent ]
yeah...well. (5.00 / 1) (#77)
by unstable on Mon May 14, 2001 at 02:12:24 PM EST

he is the only one (that I know of) that sang it.

and its hard to quote a quote when you dont know were it originated....btw any ideas or is it just one of those sayings.





Reverend Unstable
all praise the almighty Bob
and be filled with slack

[ Parent ]
explanation (2.33 / 3) (#88)
by G Neric on Tue May 15, 2001 at 10:52:24 PM EST

it's very traditional: used by Christians to explain the death of children, an idea something along the lines of "God would not be so cruel as to send a child to Hell, therefore any child who dies must have died free from sin".

Mr. Joel was using the phrase cynically (I think, I've never been a fan) to mean "go ahead and sin so you won't be one of the ones who dies."

[ Parent ]

It's only by random chance that I care (3.00 / 1) (#68)
by Anonymous 6522 on Mon May 14, 2001 at 08:17:59 AM EST

This sucks, that's all there is too it. Douglas Adams was a damn good author, and it's a shame that he had to pass away at such a young age.

It's kind of odd, I stumbled upon the HHGTG compleatly by chance. I was in middle school and my family was going to go on vacatioin. My dad brought be to a bookstore to pick out a book to read on the plane. I wanted to get a Calvin & Hobbes book, but my dad said that he would only get me that if I also chose a novel, so I turned around and picked up the first book I saw, which was an compilation of all of the HHGTG books up until So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish. If wasn't standing in that exact place, at that exact time, I would probably have never read any of Douglas Adams' books, or actually care that he died.

Likewise (4.00 / 2) (#69)
by Phil the Canuck on Mon May 14, 2001 at 09:11:27 AM EST

My mother bought me three books one day. One of them was the Hitchhiker's Guide. I read the other two first, but couldn't tell you what they were. I was completely hooked from the first page.

------

I don't think being an idiot comes with a pension plan though. Unless you're management of course. - hulver
[ Parent ]

Very, very sad. (4.50 / 4) (#70)
by jd on Mon May 14, 2001 at 09:41:13 AM EST

His sci-fi books (and there were many) were unquestionably brilliant. His scripts for Doctor Who (eg: Pirate Planet) were memorable. Maybe not the best, but definitely memorable.

IMHO, though, the ultimate Douglas Adams work was "Last Chance To See", a story about finding endangered animals, and poking fun at them.

LCTS -has- to be the most readable, entertaining, fascinating book on ecology that has ever been written. Animal Planet, move aside! This book is the -ultimate- guide to the rarer life on Earth.

Last, but not least, Douglas Adams led a stressful life. Yes, he led it to the hilt, but the hilt snapped. As tragic as I (and many millions of others!) believe this, I'm not so sure DA, himself, would have wanted it any other way. Unlike other authors, he never had to suffer the slow decline, the fading star. He shone bright, before going supernova. No enfeebled mind, no failing health, no drawn-out tragedy.

Yes, we will miss one of the greatest minds that sci-fi has ever seen. Nothing can change that. But would =we= have truly wanted it any other way, either? He was at the pinnacle. The only way left was down. Would we have truly wished that on him?

Everything I have to say (3.00 / 2) (#73)
by spaceghoti on Mon May 14, 2001 at 12:10:32 PM EST

I said it here.



"Humor. It is a difficult concept. It is not logical." -Saavik, ST: Wrath of Khan

So long, and thanks for all the fish! 42! (3.00 / 4) (#79)
by cable on Mon May 14, 2001 at 02:58:44 PM EST

It is a sad day indeed when he died. One of the things that helped me forget about my depression was reading the HHGTTG book. My friends all liked to read it as well.

I will lower my towel at half mast, it has a "42" on it.

I wonder if the HHGTTG movie is still going to be made?

------------------
Only you, can help prevent Neb Rage!

damn, damn, damn. (4.75 / 4) (#82)
by Shren on Tue May 15, 2001 at 01:37:13 AM EST

I was reading his books this weekend before I heard the news. That really made it bite.

I don't suppose there's any chance he's spending a year dead for tax reasons?

An Inspiration (4.00 / 2) (#84)
by ozjimbob on Tue May 15, 2001 at 03:40:55 AM EST

Douglas Adams was truly an inspiration to me. His books like H2G2 and the Dirk Gently books were obviously great, but I have to give him the most credit for "Last Chance to See". That book affected me deeply, and inspired me to study Environmental Science and to work towards a carreer in conservation and environmental protection. Thanks Douglas.
I still believe in revolution, I just don't capitalize it anymore.
Mostly Harmless? (2.50 / 2) (#85)
by loaf on Tue May 15, 2001 at 06:02:26 AM EST

That might be how we should describe Earth.

At least it is now we have to find someone else to lead the way.



In honour of douglas adams... (4.00 / 2) (#91)
by trebuchet on Wed May 16, 2001 at 10:20:57 AM EST

Friday, May 25 is Towel day. All fans of THHGTTG are encouraged to carry a towel with them for the day.

http://www.binaryfreedom.com/content.php?content_id=46

(Yeah, yeah, i know this was on That Other Site)


--
I wanna be a new original creation,
A cross between a moose, a monkey, and a fig.
I'm ready, Monsanto, let me be your guinea pig.
--Moxy Fruvous
And my site, too. (5.00 / 1) (#92)
by Crashnbur on Wed May 16, 2001 at 11:46:55 AM EST

And don't forget that the Thursday closest to May 11, from May 25 of this year till infinity, will always be known as Towel Day in remembrance of Douglas Adams.

Spread the word! Spread his words! Let the unenlightened read his books. Convince them! (I've already lent both of my copies of the book to two of my friends. One finished it and absolutely loved it and wants to borrow my Ultimate Guide to read the other five stories!)

People, if you have not read the book(s), you will enjoy them. (All you have to do is believe that.) And the books are relatively short! You can do it!

crash.neotope.com


[ Parent ]
umm... wait, I'm confused. (none / 0) (#101)
by ODiV on Wed May 23, 2001 at 03:28:52 PM EST

So this year, towel day is on Friday, May 25th which is neither Thursday, or the Thursday closest to May 11, but from then on it will be?


--
[ odiv.net ]
[ Parent ]
Douglas Adams Dies At Age 49 | 104 comments (100 topical, 4 editorial, 0 hidden)
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