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[P]
Web Logs Suck

By jamesarcher in Op-Ed
Sat Apr 21, 2001 at 07:15:12 PM EST
Tags: Internet (all tags)
Internet

A "web log" or "blog" is either a place where people list interesting things they've found online or a sort of diary/journal, or (more usually) a combination of the two.

There is nothing instrinsically wrong with the nature of the web log. In the early days of the web, back when Yahoo! was still a tilde account, it was necessary for people to post their accounts of things discovered on the web, because search engines were still rough and inefficient. The web was a like a small, exotic nation, and web logs served as a guide to show us the local customs and points of interest.

Now, the web is more like a global superpower than a third-world country, and there are hundreds of thousands of people attemping to guide us through it with their little Blogger-powered web log. It's like a five-year-old street urchin offering to show us around New York City; We are simply better off trying to figure it out on our own.


In addition, we now have massive directories and intelligent search engines to get us where we need to go.

Many web loggers, having realized that they are, in the grand scheme of things, completely worthless, have resorted to "meta" web logging; i.e., writing accounts of other people writing accounts. (Exhibit A, Exhibit B, Exhibit C) In a massive display of pointlessness, great crowds of otherwise intelligent and even interesting people have directed their efforts to patting each other on the back instead of on trying to do something useful in the world.

The Internet was hyped for years as the tool that would put mass communication back in the hands of the common man. Oppression, corruption, and propaganda would become obsolete as the unstifled voice of sanity would shine through.

Unfortunately, it turned out that the common man really had nothing to say, though his intoxication with freedom of speech has prevented him from realizing that. Thus, the common man continues to bombard the Web with new servers, new sites, new software, and new random musings about wanting a bike.

The point is that web logs are worthless. Contrary to what you have been told, you really don't have anything interesting to say. Nobody wants to know about what kind of toothpaste you use, what your mood icon looks like at the moment, or how sorry you are for not updating your site regularly.

If you run a web log, stop. Look at your life. Look at all the time you spend on rambling, ranting, and copy-and-pasting when you could be out doing something fun instead.

Am I doing the very thing that I am ranting about in this little essay?

Yes. Yes I am.

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Poll
Do you have a weblog?
o Yes 27%
o Yes, but I don't call it that. 72%

Votes: 55
Results | Other Polls

Related Links
o Yahoo
o list
o Yahoo! was still a tilde account
o five-year- old street urchin
o massive directories
o intelligen t search engines
o Exhibit A
o Exhibit B
o Exhibit C
o nothing to say
o wanting a bike
o doing something fun
o Also by jamesarcher


Display: Sort:
Web Logs Suck | 41 comments (28 topical, 13 editorial, 0 hidden)
Hmm... (3.40 / 20) (#2)
by Signal 11 on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 07:07:15 PM EST

Oh, bleeding death.

Web logs provide for an online community after the BBS communities were killed off. Sites like slashdot and kuro5hin are a logical outcome of this, and many people still maintain BBS' online just because they promote a community feeling. People login here every day to check on the latest stories, vote, see what others have to say, and reaffirm certain beliefs that they have about the world. Sometimes they come here for intellectual stimulation, other times they come here because they're mad at the world and want to vent. Whatever the reason, what we have here is a community of individuals who share a lot of common beliefs - and have a lot of differences.

This is not a bad thing. Diaries are likewise ways by which we communicate. My online diary has served as a conduit for communicating with several of my friends. It has gotten me in trouble before as well. But most of all, it is a way of showing the world a side of me I can't show in other ways because there's either no opportunity to discuss what's on my mind, or because it's just not a topic you bring up casually.

Communication is the corner-stone of the democratic process, and it is also the spark and energy behind progress... it is through the social energies created here and elsewhere that people find the power to create, whether it be an idea, a program, or a mechanical device.

Certainly there are some weblogs out there that don't generate this kind of dynamic - they remain static and boring, and I would venture that most of them fit into the second category, but for the few that do succeed and reach critical mass, it is certainly something worthy of discussion, or atleast admiration.


--
Society needs therapy. It's having
trouble accepting itself.

Weblogs combat democracy. (3.28 / 14) (#4)
by enterfornone on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 08:04:41 PM EST

Contrary to what Sig11 says, communication is not the cornerstone of democracy. Leaders in a democracy must restrict communication in order to make the public believe what they want them to believe. And the voices of the minority will always be drowned out by the voices of the majority.

Likewise, there are plenty of search engines and directories etc, but they all have an agenda- whether they pander to advertisers like yahoo or to the majority like k5. More often that not, the lone unpopular voice will be drowned out in favour of whatever the majority want (or are willing to pay for).

Personal weblogs allow those whom may not have any reperesentation in the democratic process to still have their voice. They can communicate and those who agree with them can receive that communication. Rather than being answerable to the majority or those with the cash they allow people to become their own dictator and for others to choose their dictator.

Weblogs don't help the democratic process. The exist to allow free communication despite democracy's flaws.

--
efn 26/m/syd
Will sponsor new accounts for porn.
Weblogs assist democracy, combat current gov'ts. (none / 0) (#31)
by LordEq on Sat Apr 21, 2001 at 10:21:25 PM EST

You severely need to check your definition of democracy.

1.Government by the people, exercised either directly or through elected representatives.
2.A political or social unit that has such a government.
3.The common people, considered as the primary source of political power.
4.Majority rule.
5.The principles of social equality and respect for the individual within a community.
Definitions courtesy of dictionary.com.

The second part of definition 1, "Government by the people, exercised... through elected representatives", is called a republic, and is what many governments (USian included) claim to practice. It just ain't so. We just pick 'em -- after that, it's out of our hands. This twisted version of a republic is what is threatened by communication -- not true democracy.



--LordEq

"That's what K5's about. Hippies and narcs cavorting together." --panck
[ Parent ]
Taken To Extreme's: The Mblog (1.50 / 2) (#36)
by adambomb on Sun Apr 22, 2001 at 07:23:50 AM EST

Originally Posted 4.21.01 www.jackedthoughts.blogspot.com The logical and extreme vison of the web log will begin when the first person jacks a wireless modem to the base of thier skull and begins to stream all thoughts, feelings, memories and mental pictures to a Mblog (mega blog) page on a server at Yahoo2010. This will allow people to avoid the nasty fact that today they need keyboards and computers and land line connection to the web in order to broadcast all thier deepest meaningful thoughts to no one in particular. And we've all had the problem of having a great idea but forgetting it by the time you get access to the web. It will be total access Imagine this senario: I have my Mblog up and running. All my thoughts go up for people to see. I am walking down the street on a bright spring day and a nice looking young lady in front of me bends down to pick up a quarter. On seeing this lovely behind I snap a mental picture and comment, "My, what a nice ass." Now everyone in the network can see that I have again looked at a woman's buttocks. I could send this to my buddies because we all have monitoring applications to filter thru the Mblog of our closest friends for relavent tidbits. So I could draw attention by highlighting it for say DeadJedi by thinking "Deadjedi: Nice Ass!" and he will have the picture and the thought displayed for him. And since I have filtering software of my own, I'll be able to see him respond, "Adam: yes, quite nice ass!" And since everyone of his friends will have filtering software, there will be a wave of ohh's and ah's as people see the magnificent ass of the young lady in front of me. And if she has a truely great behind, the whole world may get to see what I just seen. It will develop into a form of technologically moderated telepathy. I know this isn't a new idea - even Star Trek used something like it way back. But the idea that the blog is responsible for this is unprecedented. It will be the ultimate in self promotion and "look at me" lifestyle. People will be On Stage 24/7 and will live thier lives accordingly. More people will go to extremes for ratings and adoration. There will be so much porn on the Mblog network that it may degenerate into a total porn network and push other forms of communication to alternative networks. Back to my example, Now that I have spread the lovely form of a woman across the Mblog network, this may get back to her. In fact, it probably will get back to her like a vicious rumor begun by co-workers. If she is smart, she will have a filtering software of her own that pulls up any material in reference to her, about her or images of her, so she can monitor what people are stalking her. This feature is called the "Richard Nixon" filtering system. We could have called it "paranoia," but didn't want to give paranoid's a bad name. So chances are she knew I took a mental picture immediately after I posted it and was observing the wave caused by her bending over for that quarter. And I certainly do have the Richard Nixon filtering system installed and working overtime, so I can see that she was moderately pleased with the response and adoration she recieved. And I can see that she is not going to slap me - although to be honest, I'd know in advance she was going to do that and would dodge, but she'd know that as well and would alter her aim. But I'd know that also. So it's probably good she liked my taking a picture cause we would have be frozen in lunge and parry all day if she were angry - you get the picture. Mblogs can be dangerous and beneficial.They can be even more dramatic examples of a system tied to itself and the interesting waves that run through it. Now that I think of it, there wasn't any quarter for her to pick up. She was just bending over in front of me. File Under Logical and Extreme adam bomb jackedthoughts@yahoo.com

[ Parent ]
*cough* (3.33 / 9) (#5)
by AdamJ on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 08:26:57 PM EST

Look at all the time you spend on rambling, ranting, and copy-and-pasting when you could be out doing something fun instead.
Maybe I find rambling, ranting, and copy-and-pasting fun?
--
And who am I
that I should be vying for your touch
who am I
bet you can't even tell me that much

-- Ani Difranco, Untouchable Face


Um, blah. (3.12 / 8) (#7)
by Crashnbur on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 08:34:59 PM EST

Search engines take far too long to update their entries, largely due to the fact that the internet is frigging huge. The best way to find what you're looking for (or what you're not) is often through friends or weblogs that share similar interests. Sure, search engines provide greater immediate use, but there are so many things that you would never find, or not for months, with a search engine. Word-of-mouth is perhaps the greatest way to spread news quickly and easily, and while it may not be as efficient as a search engine, it can often be just as useful.

crash.neotope.com


One More (none / 0) (#22)
by Devil Ducky on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 11:24:14 AM EST

Not to mention if you put a link in your weblog to a new site that isn't in a search engine, but your weblog is in search engines (as thay always are) then the link will get indexed quicker. In the case of google, it even gives the site more "karma".

Devil Ducky

Immune to the Forces of Duct Tape
Day trading at it's Funnest
[ Parent ]
What I'd like to see (3.66 / 12) (#10)
by spacejack on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 09:12:49 PM EST

You know those old women, the ones that sit in the front window of their house, or their 1st floor apartment building and watch every single person go in and out? I hope some of them discover the internet and weblogs. (What could we call this anyways, a GrannyLog? a GLOG?) I want to know what they're thinking. I mean, would it merely be objective reporting of the facts; a list of events that occur throughout the day? Or would it be more subjective and speculative? Would they formulate theories on the lifestyles of those they see? Inquiring minds want to know!

At which point does your opinion change? (3.25 / 8) (#12)
by domesticat on Wed Apr 18, 2001 at 11:10:10 PM EST

So, yes, 99% of anything is crap. That percentage includes most of what has been written since someone first figured out how to record thoughts for posterity.

But, every once in a while, there's something worth keeping, and that 1% never pops up where you would expect it to.

In principle, I agree with you, and I wince to defend weblogs, which personally drive me crazy. Webloggers linking to other webloggers and running scripts to see which weblog has the most links (and which weblogs have received new posts in the past sixty minutes) - yuck.

There are a few people out there that have made weblogging into something more resembling a self-esteem game than anything remotely informative. I don't like it, and I don't find it interesting. Which is why I don't bother with those sites.

I'd be curious to know, though, how (or if) your stance changes along the continuum between weblog and journal. For every point between pure journaling and pure weblogging, I have no doubt there's a site that matches it.

I have trouble believing that you would classify journaling as worthless, especially if - as you indicate on your site - you have interests in linguistics and literature. The two can be combined, and are sometimes combined very well. Where does your opinion change?




[ boring .sig here ]
Here's where it changes... (1.42 / 7) (#18)
by jamesarcher on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 03:10:30 AM EST

It doesn't. I have pretty much the same opinion of journals as I do of weblogs. :)

It should be noted, however, that I have a weblog, and that there's a link from this rant on weblogs to my own weblog, where the rant was originally posted.

Just another common man trying to make himself heard. Fortunately enough people seem to be voting this article down that humankind need not be bothered by hearing it. :)

[ Parent ]
Just one question: (3.16 / 6) (#13)
by ODiV on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 12:01:36 AM EST

Where did you find out about kuro5hin?


--
[ odiv.net ]
Well, obviously... (1.75 / 4) (#19)
by jamesarcher on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 03:15:55 AM EST

...from Slashdot. :)

[ Parent ]
you don't always know where you want to go (3.36 / 11) (#14)
by delmoi on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 01:10:17 AM EST

You don't know what you want to see. Of all the intresting things I've seen on the internet, I don't think that any of them have come out of a search engine.

you might not like blogs, you might not think that they are important, but if we only did what we thought was imporntant, then the world would be a fucking boring place.

Web logs are entertainging. They let you know about places you might not have known you would be intrested in.
--
"'argumentation' is not a word, idiot." -- thelizman
Wow. (3.00 / 9) (#15)
by CrayDrygu on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 01:26:39 AM EST

Just because you don't like weblogs, that doesn't mean nobody likes them. Just because you think they're "worthless," that doesn't mean some people don't find them fascinating.

I love reading jounal-style weblogs, especially when they're well-done. I find it fascinating to look into the lives of other people, see what they deal with, see how much they're like you, and yet, how different...

Also, this style of weblog isn't necessarily just for the readers. Ever need to get something off your chest, but there's nobody you can tell? Well, with a weblog (one your friends and family don't know about), you've got an audience who's willing to listen, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

And I like the "random linkage" style as well. Yes, we have Yahoo and Dmoz, which are great when you know what you're looking for. But just like you don't look in the phone book when you want to meet new people (well maybe you do, but I bet you get hung up on a lot), I don't look at web directories when I want to find something new, something that I probably wouldn't have thought of looking for.

What bugs me the most, though, is your assertation that "the common man has nothing to say." Maybe not now. But after our civilization has collapsed, or been invaded, or just evolved so far past what it is now, I guarantee you that the anthropologists of the future will be far more interested in what you and I have to say than they will be in sets of encyclopaedias and the State of the Union Address. And I can guarantee that in full confidence, because it's exactly what today's anthopologists love to find about ancient civilizations -- they don't care about what king killed what other king. They care about why, and what it was like for the common man living under them.

(p.s. You got a -1 from me. It would have been a 0 or no vote at all if you hadn't been so arrogant, *and* so wrong.)

Web logs don't kill people.. (2.71 / 7) (#16)
by ignatiusst on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 02:44:56 AM EST

The reason I like web logs is that I get to read and discuss news and other people's opinion of the news, culture, etc.. even when I disagree with those opinions..

It's recursive.. ya gotta love that...

When a true genius appears in the world, you may know him by this sign, that the dunces are all in confederacy against him. -- Jonathan Swift

Something is wrong here... (3.40 / 10) (#20)
by k5er on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 06:19:17 AM EST

If I'm not mistaken, you are visitng a web-log, writing for a weblog, and participating in a weblog.

You, more than anyone else, should know that "Nobody wants to know about what kind of toothpaste you use, what your mood icon looks like at the moment, or how sorry you are for not updating your site regularly....or what you think of weblogs.

Weblogs kick ass, they allow for interaction between people, are constantly being updated with the latest, coolest stuff and allow for the growth of communites with similar interests. Long live the weblog!

Yep (1.57 / 7) (#24)
by jamesarcher on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 12:29:15 PM EST

I was being facetious and self-referential.

[ Parent ]
Of course they suck (3.66 / 9) (#26)
by Wah on Thu Apr 19, 2001 at 01:28:41 PM EST

why else would you be doing one? :-)

I'm all with you on the "my shopping list" stuff sucking, but I've found enough interesting things out there.

The meta-intelligent search that blogs like memepool (and MLP) provide is also rather useful in sorting through the 1% of worthwhile content. Altogether though, there's enough interesting stuff to keep enough attention focused to make this a viable media form at one point.

And then there's the ultimate point of web-logging...ego-surfing. Which seems to work o.k. for me. More opinions and viewpoints is a good thing, especially if it undermines the implied public consensus that comes from our loving media conglomerates. No producers and directors means a lower general quality, but what it does for honesty is beyond measure.
--
Fail to Obey?

Then don't do that (3.00 / 8) (#27)
by yosemite on Fri Apr 20, 2001 at 10:48:56 AM EST

<joke>

Patient:Doctor, it hurts when I move my arm like this
Doctor: well, don't do that, then.
</joke>

The great thing about the internet is that it's totally your choice where you go. If there are sites you don't like, don't surf to them.

If you surf to sites you don't like to see, well... maybe it's time for the tinfoil hat to protect you from the orbiting mind-control lasers? Just a thought.

-y



--
[Signature redacted]

ObMLP... (none / 0) (#28)
by Glacky on Fri Apr 20, 2001 at 12:37:35 PM EST

http://zapatopi.net/afdb.html

[ Parent ]
hotlists (3.45 / 11) (#29)
by eln on Fri Apr 20, 2001 at 03:28:27 PM EST

When i was a boy (okay, maybe not that long ago), peoples' collections of links were their "hotlists", and they put their ramblings either on their "rants page", "ramblings page", or just on their regular old "home page". This "web log" thing is just a new term for what used to be called someone's personal homepage, and it used to be that practically everyone on the 'net had one.

Personal homepages, no matter how crappy and "unimportant" they may be, are the sole thing that keeps the internet from just being a slower, more static, and slightly more interactive version of TV. These things are what communities are made of. They can also be a useful way of finding information that the corporate web sites won't carry, or want to charge you for.

Time was, you could fairly easily get any kind of information you wanted from somewhere on the Internet, often on some professor's homepage. Now, try to find useful information on anything, and you'll most likely find 200 places that would like to sell you a book on it, but no one that will just tell you the information. This is a huge step backward for the Internet. It was thought, way back in 1995 when this whole corporate thing exploded, that informational sites could co-exist with commercial sites. That's not the case, however, as most informational sites have either been pushed offline, or replaced with a site where you either have to pay money to get information, or give the site all of your personal information so they can sell your name to junk mailers.

Personal homepages are an ever-shrinking percentage of total web traffic online, but they are still a fairly large portion of total content. No one writes a homepage expecting it to get a million hits. People write these things for family members and friends, or to share information with some small online community. In that, they serve a very important purpose. Occasionally, someone you've never heard of may stumble upon your page and find something interesting or useful, and that makes you feel good. I used to run a site that had hundreds (!) of page views every day, and I would get 4 or 5 people a day mailing me about it. But even if a homepage never reaches such lofty heights, it is still of value. It has value to the person who wrote it, those close to him/her, and those few who may stumble upon it and find it entertaining, charming, useful, or whatever.

Besides, if you're complaining about the lack of useful information or entertaining content in web logs, I could name hundreds of corporate sites suffering from exactly the same problem.


kuro5hin op-eds suck (or at least jamesarcher's) (4.57 / 7) (#34)
by dhartung on Sun Apr 22, 2001 at 02:40:31 AM EST

Hey, don't think you're hot stuff just because you discovered how easy it is to get attention by trashing weblogs. Why, Ben Brown has been hating weblogs professionally since 1999! Yes, we're all used to this sniping from the sidelines by now.

Here's a clue: Don't like reading weblogs? Gosh, I will generously remove the gun I had pointed at your (pointed) head. Simple as that.

Weblogs do more than provide "hot links". They provide more timely and relevant pointers to time-sensitive information than any web directory ever could. They democratize the media, allowing personal stories to reach us from protestors in Quebec City who would never be interviewed on television. They create community for writers and readers alike. They provide stickiness for personal websites and needed context for projects.

But that's not why I write my weblog.

I write my weblog FOR ME. I write it because I get something out of organizing my thoughts and writing them down, out of submitting them to public scorn or praise. I write because every writing book ever published says if you want to write well you should write every day, even if you throw it all away. I write because of the response I get, ranging from emotional impact of a personal story to informative elucidation of a point of technology. I write because, well, I can, it's easy, and who the hell cares, anyway? Certainly not you.

Fine with me. Go away. This is for me, not you.

For more on this point, see my manifestito.
-- Before the Harper's Index: the Harper's Hash Table

Remember the original web-log? (4.50 / 2) (#35)
by Per Abrahamsen on Sun Apr 22, 2001 at 05:31:47 AM EST

In the good old days, when you put a new site on the web, you send an e-mail to Marc Andreessen, and he would put it on his personal web log, which was where everybody looked to see what was happening on the WWW.


Taken To Extreme's: The Mblog (1.50 / 4) (#37)
by adambomb on Sun Apr 22, 2001 at 07:29:40 AM EST

The logical and extreme vison of the web log will begin when the first person jacks a wireless modem to the base of thier skull and begins to stream all thoughts, feelings, memories and mental pictures to a Mblog (mega blog) page on a server at Yahoo2010. This will allow people to avoid the nasty fact that today they need keyboards and computers and land line connection to the web in order to broadcast all thier deepest meaningful thoughts to no one in particular. And we've all had the problem of having a great idea but forgetting it by the time you get access to the web. It will be total access Imagine this senario: I have my Mblog up and running. All my thoughts go up for people to see. I am walking down the street on a bright spring day and a nice looking young lady in front of me bends down to pick up a quarter. On seeing this lovely behind I snap a mental picture and comment, "My, what a nice ass." Now everyone in the network can see that I have again looked at a woman's buttocks. I could send this to my buddies because we all have monitoring applications to filter thru the Mblog of our closest friends for relavent tidbits. So I could draw attention by highlighting it for say DeadJedi by thinking "Deadjedi: Nice Ass!" and he will have the picture and the thought displayed for him. And since I have filtering software of my own, I'll be able to see him respond, "Adam: yes, quite nice ass!" And since everyone of his friends will have filtering software, there will be a wave of ohh's and ah's as people see the magnificent ass of the young lady in front of me. And if she has a truely great behind, the whole world may get to see what I just seen. It will develop into a form of technologically moderated telepathy. I know this isn't a new idea - even Star Trek used something like it way back. But the idea that the blog is responsible for this is unprecedented. It will be the ultimate in self promotion and "look at me" lifestyle. People will be On Stage 24/7 and will live thier lives accordingly. More people will go to extremes for ratings and adoration. There will be so much porn on the Mblog network that it may degenerate into a total porn network and push other forms of communication to alternative networks. Back to my example, Now that I have spread the lovely form of a woman across the Mblog network, this may get back to her. In fact, it probably will get back to her like a vicious rumor begun by co-workers. If she is smart, she will have a filtering software of her own that pulls up any material in reference to her, about her or images of her, so she can monitor what people are stalking her. This feature is called the "Richard Nixon" filtering system. We could have called it "paranoia," but didn't want to give paranoid's a bad name. So chances are she knew I took a mental picture immediately after I posted it and was observing the wave caused by her bending over for that quarter. And I certainly do have the Richard Nixon filtering system installed and working overtime, so I can see that she was moderately pleased with the response and adoration she recieved. And I can see that she is not going to slap me - although to be honest, I'd know in advance she was going to do that and would dodge, but she'd know that as well and would alter her aim. But I'd know that also. So it's probably good she liked my taking a picture cause we would have be frozen in lunge and parry all day if she were angry - you get the picture. Mblogs can be dangerous and beneficial.They can be even more dramatic examples of a system tied to itself and the interesting waves that run through it. Now that I think of it, there wasn't any quarter for her to pick up. She was just bending over in front of me. File Under Logical and Extreme adam bomb jackedthoughts@yahoo.com www.jackedthoughts.blogspot.com

My weblog almot got me fired. (5.00 / 1) (#38)
by infinitesin on Sun Apr 22, 2001 at 04:31:29 PM EST

I had a site called designpunk.com, where I chronicled my first job at a nationally respected design firm, and how I adapted to the professional style of design as opposed to the underground site that I was used to. Well, anyway, I wrote a comment along the lines of:

"Today, I sliced up an image for Client B; I'm not sure if I really like the typography on it, but hey, I'm not the client. Their should look very good though."

And well, the client searched for their name on Google, and lo and behold, they found my site and they were none too pleased. Consequently, in my third week on the job, I was asked to take down my site or get fired. I opted to take down the site, and I got let go about eight months later on budget cuts. Fucking designers.

Now I just write about my ex-girlfriend. What have I learned? Nothing.
--
"Just wait until tomorrow..I guess that's what they all say..just before they fall apart.."

Weblogs aren't supposed to be interesting. (none / 0) (#39)
by dreid on Sun Apr 22, 2001 at 11:24:50 PM EST

It doesn't matter if you have anything interesting to say, in my opinion that's not the point of a weblog, the point is you have a place to say the things you can't say elsewhere, who cares if no one reads them, I doubt anyone who reads this has ever been to my weblog but I still write in it every couple of days because it's my place to say the things I can't say elsewhere. It's tough being 17 and a geek, even when you live in San Jose, a weblog is a good way to vent all your anger and express all your joy.

Define a weblog. Kind of a broad term, right? (1.00 / 1) (#40)
by monickels on Mon Apr 23, 2001 at 05:36:33 AM EST

As the keeper of a weblog that involves only subtle, mild editorial comment and few of the quirky, wacky links that make up the bulk of other weblogs' material, I think you'll find that some weblogs work on concepts beyond navel-gazing and lint-picking. Not all of us are folks who secretly believe we'd make a really, really good newspaper columnist, if only lack of experience, education and something to say didn't get in the way.
<a href=http://www.worldnewyork.org>World New York
on weblogs (none / 0) (#41)
by adambomb on Mon Apr 23, 2001 at 07:05:25 AM EST

The typical weblog is like a home movie. Lots of excess information that is not important to follow the plot and shaky camera work. Even though people have been making boring self indulgent home movies for over 50 years - camcorders are always top sellers. Americans tend to be utility nuts - it doesn't matter if you use it - we just want it available should we ever need it. Like SUV's 99% of people don't use all the space inside an SUV but people would never sell them cause someday soon they might need the room for eight passengers and a 4X8 sheet of plywood. Home movies and weblogs are the same in my mind. We don't need a constant recording of our daily drivel but you never know - it may have utility someday. Be prepared taken to obsessive extreme's. And also, americans are pushing each other down to be the first to pray at the alter of popularity and notoriaty. We are becoming more and more obsessed with achieving stardom - its not just for movie stars anymore. So the "look at me" lifestyle is moving from real life where there is only a few people, to the web where there are billions who will look if you say "look at me" loud enough. SO it's in this spirit when I tell you to look at the site I contribute to www.jackedthoughts.blogspot.com adam bomb

Web Logs Suck | 41 comments (28 topical, 13 editorial, 0 hidden)
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