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[P]
Why You Probably Hate Vegemite and Why You Shouldn't

By Talez in Op-Ed
Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 11:45:51 PM EST
Tags: Culture (all tags)
Culture

Vegemite to Australians is much like Peanut Butter to Americans. We think of it as a rather delicious snack on toast, buttered bread or even in a sandwich. Up until now, I never understood why Americans hated vegemite and I'll try to address that with why you should try to enjoy vegemite and how to enjoy vegemite!


Firstly, the question I get asked most about vegemite is "What is the damn stuff?". Vegemite was originally an extract of yeast used in the brewing process. This yeast extract was then blended with celery, onions and salt to make a thick dark paste which, to many people, is quite delicious. These days, while the yeast extract component has remained, the celery and onions have been replaced by malt and vegetable extracts. However, most people will agree that it is just as delicious as the first batches released in 1923.

Why should you eat vegemite? Because, despite the huge salt content, its quite healthy for you. A piece of bread with vegemite lightly spread over it can give you almost a quater of your daily niacin requirement. Lots of body parts can benefit from the unique mix of vitamins found in vegemite and here is a quick summary:

The Cells

The billions of cells in your body each need thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothenic acid, folacin, and vitamin B6 every day to keep healthy. Vegemite includes all of these and will often provide a good percentage of your daily requirement from one slice of bread with vegemite spread thinly over it.

The Nerves

The nerve cells in the body need large amounts of thiamin and vitamns B1 and B6. Where can you get such a large amount of B group vitamins? From the richest known source of Vitamin B in the world, Vegemite!

The Skin

Skin requires many different vitamins to stay healthy. The ones you can find in vegemite include riboflavin, niacin, biotin, and vitamin B6. The body can get as much as a third of your daily riboflavin intake from one slice of vegemite!

The Eyes

The riboflavin in vegemite will help to keep your eyes nice and bright and sparkling.

The Digestive Process

Thiamin, riboflavin, and niacin are all vitamins needed for digestion and vegemite contains all of these vitamins in the one convenient paste!

So you know why vegemite is good for you. The problem is, I bet you've tried vegemite and you hated it. Well, here's a piece of advice: IT'S NOT PEANUT BUTTER! SPREAD IT THINLY!

This stuff is extremely salty and you guys take big huge gunks of it and put it all over your bread. Vegemite is an aquired taste so start small. 5g of the stuff (1/5 oz) is more than enough to cover bread with just the right consistency and the salty flavour wont be that strong.

Idealy you should be able to see the butter underneath the vegemite. Once you get used to the taste you can try adding more vegemite to get the stronger flavour. One other thing, don't try to eat it out of the jar with a spoon! Even seasoned vegemite eaters have trouble with the stuff eating it raw in huge amounts.

If you must eat vegemite raw, try using your index finger to scrape the stuff from underneath the inner top of the jar. The knife always seems to miss that part of the jar and you won't get enough on you finger to make it taste too salty.

So what are you waiting for? Go get a jar of vegemite and try it properly! Who knows, you might learn to like it too! After all, 15 million happy vegemite addicts can't be wrong ;)

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Poll
Vegemite?
o Yummy 23%
o Salty 18%
o Love It 11%
o Adore It! 10%
o It puts the rose in every cheek! 35%

Votes: 76
Results | Other Polls

Related Links
o Also by Talez


Display: Sort:
Why You Probably Hate Vegemite and Why You Shouldn't | 193 comments (191 topical, 2 editorial, 0 hidden)
Bleah (3.50 / 2) (#1)
by vambo rool on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 09:52:59 PM EST

Sounds like anchovy paste to me.

I've never seen it here. Not even in specialty stores. And my neighborhood is hip deep in specialty stores.



Fish Paste (none / 0) (#181)
by cam on Sat Mar 16, 2002 at 11:23:58 PM EST

Sounds like anchovy paste to me.

I got raised on fishpaste too. Cant eat it now, but ate it by the uteload back then.

cam
Freedom, Liberty, Equity and an Australian Republic
[ Parent ]

I've never seen the stuff (3.00 / 3) (#2)
by ShadowNode on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:00:04 PM EST

I didn't even know it was salty. I'd certianly give it a shot if I ever saw it in the grocery store. Of course I have heard of it, it seems quite popular on the other side of the world.

Maybe Americans didn't know you where supposed to cook it, I certianly didn't.

You dont cook it (5.00 / 1) (#8)
by Talez on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:05:50 PM EST

You put it on bread or toast like peanut butter... You just use a LOT less vegemite than you would use peanut butter...

Si in Googlis non est, ergo non est
[ Parent ]
What did you mean (4.00 / 1) (#13)
by ShadowNode on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:11:48 PM EST

About eating it raw, then?

[ Parent ]
Taking a hunk from the jar (5.00 / 1) (#14)
by Talez on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:15:18 PM EST

It doesn't work very well unless you've been eating it for ages. Vegemite works best if you mix it with the flavour of bread and butter or margerine...

Si in Googlis non est, ergo non est
[ Parent ]
'Raw' in context (none / 0) (#59)
by zsau on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:39:21 AM EST

What did you mean ... About eating it raw, then?
As in by itself, not with something else. From your fingers, not on bread with cheese.

[ Parent ]
Actually we hate it... (4.33 / 9) (#3)
by DesiredUsername on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:00:49 PM EST

...because it is featured prominently in the song "Land Down Under" by the cheesy 80's pop group "Men at Work". Specifically the lines:

*something* from a man from Brussels
He was six foot four and full of muscles
I said "Do you speak-a my language?"
He just smiled and gave me a vegemite sandwich

This drove a large portion of the US teen population insane, trying to figure out what was going on.

Play 囲碁

Knowing what vegemite is.... (4.00 / 1) (#6)
by DesiredUsername on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:05:12 PM EST

...has finally helped me fill in the something as well.

Buying bread from a man in Brussels...

Play 囲碁
[ Parent ]

6'4" and full of muscles!! (4.50 / 4) (#10)
by jabber on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:07:55 PM EST

Woohoo!! That was a great song.. I've got the CD here somewhere.. The only 80's songs that were better was Aha's Take on Me and Matthew Wilder's Break My Style.. God, I feel 16 again.. Woohoo!!! Where's my skinny leather tie and fedora?? Heh!

[TINK5C] |"Is K5 my kapusta intellectual teddy bear?"| "Yes"
[ Parent ]

take...on....MEEEEEEEEE!!! (4.00 / 2) (#12)
by DesiredUsername on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:11:08 PM EST

It is funny you you would mention those two songs because, together with Land Down Under, they were my fave songs back then. In fact, Break My Style was the first song I ever taped off of the radio. Did you know it was covered recently?

I was sixteen back then, but I didn't wear those cool threads that you apparently did.

I have to confess, though, that I hadn't heard LDU in a number of years and I actually had to DL it to remember those lyrics.

Play 囲碁
[ Parent ]

Break My _Stride_ (4.00 / 2) (#18)
by Riktov on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:22:04 PM EST

...not Style, the song was. Damn, that was an irritating song! Just beat out by "Take On Me" as the most irritating song of the '80s.



[ Parent ]
You sucked me in, but.... (4.50 / 2) (#15)
by DesiredUsername on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:16:31 PM EST

...I was right. It is actually Break My Stride.

Play 囲碁
[ Parent ]
I love that song! (none / 0) (#116)
by etherdeath on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 10:55:33 AM EST

I haven't actually tried vegemite yet, but I've wanted to just due to hearing this fine tune! Sadly, the majority of my knowledge of Australia comes from the two or three Men at Work songs I know.

[ Parent ]
My knowledge of Australia.. (4.00 / 1) (#124)
by DesiredUsername on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:22:49 PM EST

...comes from Crocodile Dundee and Yahoo Serious (more specifically, Young Einstein--a classic hilarious movie that I highly recommend).

Oh and Sydney has an ugly opera house.

And Slashdot posts stories about their oppressive regime.

Gosh, I'm practically an expert!

Play 囲碁
[ Parent ]

This has been a weird day... (none / 0) (#159)
by andrewhy on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 04:13:22 AM EST

I watched a Simpsons rerun earlier where they were in Australia (This is the one where Bart makes a collect call to Australia and has to get booted in the ass by the Prime Minister).

And on top of that, this is the second time i've seen the word "vegemite" online today. Any reason for this sudden exposure to australian culture?

And how is it pronounced?

If "Noise" means uncomfortable sound, then pop music is noise to me -- Masami Akita, aka "Merzbow"
[ Parent ]

It's pronounced (4.00 / 1) (#160)
by haakon on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 04:24:08 AM EST

"Vegie (as in short for vegetable) might"

[ Parent ]
+1 FP (3.00 / 3) (#5)
by jabber on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:04:58 PM EST

I'm going to the store, right now, to get some Vegemite.. It sounds positively awesome..

But then again, I grew up on salted lard & bacon sandwiches and Sprats, so that's not saying much..

[TINK5C] |"Is K5 my kapusta intellectual teddy bear?"| "Yes"

Fun with vegemite (4.16 / 6) (#7)
by Toojays on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:05:28 PM EST

Once you've figured out how to eat vegemite on toast, I would recommend trying it with a couple of poached eggs on top. Vegemite and eggs on toast makes a nice change from bacon and egs on toast (if you're the kind of person who likes eggs on toast).

I think I've just decided what I'll have for lunch today ;)



As a migrant Aussie.. (3.00 / 3) (#9)
by cvou on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:07:06 PM EST

I recently found Vegemite on sale in Sobeys! Right next to marmite as a cooking ingredient :)

I bought one on the spot :)

Because we love our Vegemite we all adore our Vegemite it puts a rose in every cheek!

To All Those Americans: (3.00 / 1) (#11)
by Talez on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:09:39 PM EST

Do you guys have Milo as well?

Si in Googlis non est, ergo non est
the grain? (4.00 / 2) (#30)
by demi on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 11:01:48 PM EST

Because that's what we feed to cattle if I am not mistaken.



[ Parent ]

Milo and vegemite (none / 0) (#58)
by zsau on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:36:01 AM EST

Because [Milo]'s what we feed to cattle if I am not mistaken.
Milo is not a grain. Milo is one of those instant chocolate drinks, to give it a rough definition. But it isn't. I thought Milo was something you got everywhere. On Vegimite: Vegimite is best on toast with plastic cheese, IMHO. In fact, that's the only way you'll get me to eat plastic cheese :) Someone once gave me a sample of Vegemite and Promite, in the Pepsi-ad style. Unlike the Pepsi ads, the Vegemite was better. The same someone puts Vegemite in spaghetti sauce rather than salt. It's kind of like tabasco when used like that, you can't tell whether someone's put Vegemite into it, but it enhances the flavour.

[ Parent ]
Clarification (none / 0) (#133)
by Mzilikazi on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 03:13:10 PM EST

Milo is not a grain.

Milo is also a grain. :) It's also known as grain sorghum, and is used primarily as animal feed here in the US.

A site with links about milo and pictures:
Tina's Favorite Milo Links

Further proof that there's damned near *everything* online. :)

[ Parent ]

Pumpkin and Vegemite soup (none / 0) (#137)
by static on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:20:21 PM EST

That reminds me of a tasty pumpkin soup recipe my mother makes. It also calls for a tablespoon (I think) of Vegemite so I call it Pumpkin and Vegemite soup to distinguish it from other pumpkin soup recipes she has. :-)

Wade.

[ Parent ]

Yes! (4.00 / 1) (#40)
by DanTheCat on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:10:44 AM EST

My cubemate has some at work, I believe she got it at an asian grocery store. (probably korean) Though I must admit, picky bastard that I am, I haven't tried it yet.

Dan :)

<--->
the art of compromise is now the only one they teach in schools
...
the art of compromise paid for all their swimming pools

[ Parent ]
yes we do (none / 0) (#119)
by chopper on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:28:30 AM EST

i found it at an asian grocery in Chinatown in DC.

i did a double take, because my dog is named Milo.

give a man a fish,he'll eat for a day

give a man religion and he'll starve to death while praying for a fish
[ Parent ]

Milo (none / 0) (#126)
by Boronx on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:43:51 PM EST

Asian markets do carry this. It's sort of like Ovaltine but harder to make.
Subspace
[ Parent ]
The way to make milo. (none / 0) (#155)
by Jacques Chester on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 12:52:57 AM EST

Milo tends not to dissolve smoothly into milk. The secret is to boil some water, and use that to liquifying the milo. Then slowly blend in the milk, so it's nice and even.

Dump a spoon of milo of top. A lot of people like the floating undissolved blobs.

--
In a world where an Idea can get you killed, Thinking is the most dangerous act of all.
[ Parent ]

mmm Milo (5.00 / 1) (#157)
by 'abstrakt on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 03:28:34 AM EST

The floaty bits are essential.

The best way to consume Milo is to place at least 3 heaped teaspoons into a large mug, add milk and microwave until hot (but not boiling).

Then, add another 1-2 teaspoons onto the top. This ensures a delicious beverage with just the right amount of crunchy floaty bits.

Mmm... texture.

abstrakt

[ Parent ]

with cheese! (3.83 / 6) (#16)
by benw on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:17:49 PM EST

one of my favourite sandwiches ever is the vegemite and cheese combo. i believe at one point kraft (the people who make vegemite) were marketing a vegemite-and-cheese combination cheese slice - get kraft's processed cheddar *and* vegemite in one. for those too lazy to even spread vegemite on bread. genius! pity they don't make it any more.

and as for those promite/marmite/[^vege]mite eaters - heathens, the lot of them ;-)

--
"vanilla-licking sofa-humpers". funny.
I remember them! (4.00 / 1) (#23)
by Talez on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:38:31 PM EST

Kraft... Vegemite... SINGLES!!!!

It's a pity that processed cheese sucks though :(

I much prefer the real kind when I do vegemite and cheese...

Si in Googlis non est, ergo non est
[ Parent ]
Better than singles... (5.00 / 1) (#50)
by fink on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 01:33:49 AM EST

mmm... melted... cheese.

Try this: Make a cheese & vegemite sandwich. The usual way, of course - I use Malanda Mild, but a lot of people prefer Coon. Not that silly plastic pre-packaged sliced stuff. You want to use reasonably thick slices of cheese, too, and I like my vegemite.

Once you've made the sandwich, wrap it in a paper towel and chuck it in the microwave oven for around 30 seconds. That should be enough to melt the cheese right through, and turn the bread a lovely spongy texture.

Then, enjoy! I find it a great snack for when I'm not really in the mood to cook a real dinner.


----
[ Parent ]

Yes! With cheese..... hmmmmm cheddar (none / 0) (#172)
by Kaos on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 05:24:36 PM EST

Try it on Rye bread with cheddar, yum yum yum.

But what would I know, I even like peanut butter & cheddar (but it has to be a sharper cheddar to go with peanut butter) on rye.

Be wary of strong drink, it can make you shoot at tax collectors and miss.
[ Parent ]
-1 (4.45 / 11) (#17)
by wji on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:21:12 PM EST

Too salty-yeast-paste-centric.

(Just kiddingm you really get +1FP for a good article on such a great topic)

In conclusion, the Powerpuff Girls are a reactionary, pseudo-feminist enterprise.

What does it taste like? (4.00 / 2) (#19)
by thenick on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:23:57 PM EST

I haven't seen any Vegemite in my area, so I'm wondering, what does it taste like? Is it the same or similar to Gnutella? If not, what else, if anything, tastes like Vegemite?


"Doing stuff is overrated. Like Hitler, he did a lot, but don't we all wish he would have stayed home and gotten stoned?" -Dex
Its sorta like (5.00 / 1) (#21)
by Talez on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:30:38 PM EST

It's a malty sort of flavour that has a strong, almost overpowering, salt taste to it. It's impossible to say vegemite tastes like something because I've never ever tasted anything that tastes like vegemite. It's unique! :D

Si in Googlis non est, ergo non est
[ Parent ]
Salt (5.00 / 1) (#39)
by J'raxis on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:10:43 AM EST

So it tastes like ... salt.

— The Raxis

[ J’raxis·Com | Liberty in your lifetime ]
[ Parent ]

No. (5.00 / 1) (#43)
by Jacques Chester on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:33:47 AM EST

Vegemite tastes like vegemite. It's salty in flavour, but doesn't taste like salt. One can make analogies with soya sauce, which while being salty, does not taste like salt.

--
In a world where an Idea can get you killed, Thinking is the most dangerous act of all.
[ Parent ]
miso paste (none / 0) (#95)
by myyth on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:37:24 AM EST

I always think its a lttle like red miso paste .. only without the subtle sweetness of miso. Much more savoury

[ Parent ]
Re; What does it taste like? (5.00 / 1) (#24)
by benw on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:41:11 PM EST

that's one of the big things a lot of people get wrong about it (no offence intended, thenick) - despite its appearance, it's not a chocolate or chocolcate-like paste. the article got it pretty right - it's pretty salty, definitely savoury and very strong. hard to explain exactly what it tastes like, exactly; it tastes like...um...vegemite.

(on an NFL show here years back, i saw a guest NFL player they had over for the superbowl show grab a chicken wing from a platter and dip it into a jar of the good stuff, get a large gob of it on the chicken, then proceed to eat it. great moment. did wonders for diplomacy.)

--
"vanilla-licking sofa-humpers". funny.
[ Parent ]
Re; What does it taste like? (4.00 / 1) (#27)
by gilmae on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:52:51 PM EST

Pretty much like Death Incarnate.

[ Parent ]
(sp) Gnutella=filesharing (4.00 / 1) (#33)
by thenick on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 11:18:30 PM EST

That's nutellan, not gnutella. I've been stealing music for way too long.


"Doing stuff is overrated. Like Hitler, he did a lot, but don't we all wish he would have stayed home and gotten stoned?" -Dex
[ Parent ]
feet (4.00 / 1) (#36)
by Cal Jayson on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:01:06 AM EST

Vegemite tastes like your feet after playing basketball.
--
kx.com: 2.5 billion trades
select max price from trade takes 1 second
[ Parent ]
Like V-8 juice on steroids <NT> (3.00 / 1) (#38)
by acronos on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:08:39 AM EST



[ Parent ]
Mm.... nutella.... AARRGGGHHH!!! (none / 0) (#61)
by zsau on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:46:56 AM EST

A common initiation ritual for Australianisation is being fed Vegemite but being told it's Nutella. My grade prep (first year of primary school; I think it's about equivalent to America's Kinder, but I could be wrong) teacher did that to herself... she was living in a shared house, woke up in the middle of the night hungry, went to make herself a sandwich and found a jar of Nutella, only it wasn't Nutella.

[ Parent ]
Re: What does it taste like? (4.00 / 1) (#134)
by inonurmi on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 03:39:24 PM EST

In a Billy Connelly routine, something was said along the lines of:

Vegemite tastes like licking a cat's arse.

Food for thought?

Inonurmi

[ Parent ]

Don't miss Vegemite (4.00 / 4) (#20)
by freakie on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:29:46 PM EST

Since coming to the US, the one thing I can say with all honesty that I do NOT miss is Vegemite!!!


"Give'm Etch-a-Sketches...they'll never know the difference!"

My little secret: vegemite on cold toast. (3.40 / 5) (#22)
by jamesm on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:33:19 PM EST

Yes, vegemite on cold toast is one of life's true wonders.

Wait until the toast cools down completely, add a generous amount of butter, then spread some vegemite on top.

Vegemite on Saladas... (none / 0) (#82)
by DavidatEeyore on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:08:12 AM EST

Vegemite (food of the gods in small quantities) is good on both hot or cold toast. It's even better on Saladas (for foreigners, square salty crackers) with cheese... yum yum.. I had Marmite in England years ago - not very nice at all.. you can get it in Australia but the local product (Vegemite) outsells it..

dt..

[ Parent ]
Saladas ??? (4.00 / 1) (#94)
by myyth on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:34:31 AM EST

Surely you mean vita-wheats .... you know, vita-wheat, butter, vegemite, vita-wheat on top - squeeze them together and watch the little worms squeeze up through the holes ??

[ Parent ]
Well, yes, them too. (none / 0) (#138)
by static on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:24:05 PM EST

But Salada's are also great with Vegemite.

Wade.

[ Parent ]

you people are sick! (4.36 / 11) (#25)
by andrewm on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:43:26 PM EST

Sick I say! And if the internet can turn people into insane vegemite eaters, then maybe there really is a problem after all..
15 million happy vegemite addicts can't be wrong
They can, however, be extremely disturbed, and in desperate need of help, so it wouldn't be polite to call them 'wrong'.

:)

so what about ... (4.50 / 2) (#31)
by SocratesGhost on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 11:16:10 PM EST

...the 5.85 billion rest of us that won't touch the stuff?

-Soc
I drank what?


[ Parent ]
math error. (3.00 / 2) (#45)
by physicsgod on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:40:52 AM EST

6 billion less 15 million would be 5.985 billion.

--- "Those not wearing body armor are hereby advised to keep their arguments on-topic" Schlock Mercenary
[ Parent ]
i suck. (n/t) (none / 0) (#141)
by SocratesGhost on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:30:15 PM EST


-Soc
I drank what?


[ Parent ]
An immigrants take on Vegemite (3.00 / 1) (#55)
by smallstepforman on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:12:33 AM EST

I'm an immigrant to Australia, and I was also puzzled by this thing called 'Vegemite'. The first time I tasted it, it was awful. "God, how can people eat this crap" I thought. After several years I tried it again, this time convinced to give it a serious go. And guess what. It tastes better with every bite. Its a narcotic, I tell you. You become addicted and absolutely love the stuff.

To summarise, try it, and after making the initial appaling and disgusting look on your face, try it again. Take another bite. Vomit. Take another bite - it just keeps on getting better after that. Just like beer. Or your first cigarette. Or sex.


[ Parent ]
Too right, mate! (3.00 / 4) (#26)
by Maclir on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:48:20 PM EST

That vege is bloody beaut stuff, no worries mate.

You could have metioned the Official Vegemite Home Page. It even has the "We're happy little Vegemites" song.

+1, FP

"It puts a rot in every cheek!" -- ?! (none / 0) (#54)
by Gris Grue on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:02:13 AM EST

What the hell's the last line in that song? I'm trying to sing along merrily, but the chorus of acidic-food-paste-disfigured children in my head won't let me.


If a bad zombie gets you, he will weep on you, or take away your whiskey, or hurt your daughter's bones.
[ Parent ]

A Rose in every cheek ?? (none / 0) (#93)
by myyth on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:31:29 AM EST

Rosy cheeks = healthy kids (apparently)

[ Parent ]
Spread (4.20 / 5) (#28)
by vambo rool on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 10:58:23 PM EST

Give me Nutella! MMmmm.

looks like earwax (3.00 / 4) (#29)
by demi on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 11:00:26 PM EST

smells like feet, and it tastes horribly salty, but incredibly the second time I tried it I rather enjoyed it. Good stuff!

BTW I eat cheez curls too and god knows what they are made of.



When will I get cancer? (4.00 / 4) (#32)
by inerte on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 11:17:58 PM EST

Everyday, they change what an aliment can make to your body. Is this the vegemite is health week?

--
Bodily exercise, when compulsory, does no harm to the body; but knowledge which is acquired under compulsion obtains no hold on the mind.
Plato

Vegemite vs. Marmite? (4.25 / 4) (#35)
by tmoertel on Wed Mar 13, 2002 at 11:46:26 PM EST

I live in the USA and can find Marmite at a local store but I can't find Vegemite. What's the difference between the two? Should I seek out Vegemite or purchase the easy-to-find Marmite?

Thanks for any wisdom you can share.

--
My blog | LectroTest

[ Disagree? Reply. ]


Marmite - Vegemite for kiddies (2.25 / 4) (#42)
by Jacques Chester on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:31:37 AM EST

Marmite is a Vegemite take-off produced by Sanitarium. You remember Sanitarium: they spend your money turning people into Adventists. The poms have a similar "Vegemite Lite" spread called Promite, and I know that on continental europe, one can often find the lightest, laziest of the lot, Cenovis.

But unfair ad hominems aside. Vegemite is the Real Thing. And it tastes far better on toast with butter.

--
In a world where an Idea can get you killed, Thinking is the most dangerous act of all.
[ Parent ]

Marmite (3.50 / 2) (#67)
by wysoft on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 03:54:00 AM EST

Marmite was around before Vegemite, which was originally named "Parwill" before Fred Walker started a naming contest that landed its current name. Thanks.

[ Parent ]
They're both... (none / 0) (#108)
by katie on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:37:01 AM EST


*HORRIBLE*.

"Yeast extract"... pah!!

You want yeast extract; drink beer. You want food; eat steak.




[ Parent ]
Not Really (4.75 / 4) (#73)
by bc on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:23:31 AM EST

Vegemite is actually a take off of Marmite, and a good 20 years younger, too, as well as weaker.

The 'Marmite' you are referring to is made by Sanitarium foods to a completely different specification. It isn't really Marmite at all, and appears to be an Antipodean phenomenon. The only thing it shares is the brand name.

Real Marmite has been produced in Surrey since 1902, and the current company owning the site is CPC(UK). They get their yeast extract from the Bass Brewery located 2 miles from the factory, as is traditional.

Marmite will celebrate its centenary in November this year.

♥, bc.
[ Parent ]

Erroneous (none / 0) (#189)
by Jacques Chester on Mon Mar 18, 2002 at 08:18:52 PM EST

It has been pointed out that I have mixed up Promite and Marmite. For all of you who have felt insulted by my antipodean ignorance, I apologise.

--
In a world where an Idea can get you killed, Thinking is the most dangerous act of all.
[ Parent ]
better yet (3.00 / 2) (#48)
by cicero on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 01:23:25 AM EST

believe me, you'd really enjoy a cinnabutter (i don't know what it's really called, but it's cinamon and sugar, on melting butter. on toast, there's really nothing better) over either.


--
I am sorry Cisco, for Microsoft has found a new RPC flaw - tonight your e0 shall be stretched wide like goatse.
[ Parent ]
Cinnabutter (none / 0) (#123)
by j0e on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:13:25 PM EST

I didn't know this had a name, but it is definitely a great treat. I can't imagine all the salty spreads being discussed here can compete with cinnabutter.

FYI, you can just mix the cinnamon and sugar and keep it in a shaker. Than you can melt butter on the hot bread and sprinkle the cinnamon sugar over it.

Unfortunately, we can't make any positive health claims... unless some of the readers need to put on weight. :-)

[ Parent ]

Vegemite is awful (4.66 / 3) (#68)
by davidmb on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 03:56:36 AM EST

It's an Australian rip-off of Marmite. Once you've tasted Marmite you'll never want to touch Vegemite again.

Vegemite was first created in 1922.

Marmite pre-dates it by 20 years
־‮־
[ Parent ]

Love it! (4.16 / 6) (#37)
by pla on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:02:33 AM EST

I first encountered vegemite when a friend's mother (formerly an Australian) handed us a rather peculiar-looking plate of what I will call "sandwiches" for lack of a better word.

My first bite hooked me. I *love* that stuff... Give me a loaf of bread and a jar of vegemite, and by the end of the day, one (or both) of them will have ceased to exist.

Unfortunately, finding it seems all but impossible in most of the US. A friend once sent me a case from Georgia, and aside from that, I *just* found my first jar in half a decade at a local specialty foods store (amazingly expensive, though, so I really would prefer a different source).

As for the taste, which it seems most Americans have never experienced... Imagine a beer flavored boullion cube in a spreadable form, and you've *almost* got it. That may not sound very nice, but I consider it reasonably accurate, and it really does taste better than that sounds. "Peanut butter" almost describes the texture, but it behaves a bit more waxy than peanut butter.

Okay, now everyone go write a letter to Kraft requesting they push Vegemite on the US market, so I can have a steady supply of it.


Umm... (5.00 / 2) (#56)
by Wojina on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:27:34 AM EST

They do! :)

[ Parent ]
The Name.. (none / 0) (#127)
by Boronx on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:55:54 PM EST

The name "Vegimite" just won't work in the American market.
Subspace
[ Parent ]
Just tried Marmite... (none / 0) (#185)
by pla on Sun Mar 17, 2002 at 01:56:58 PM EST

Okay, I know, bad form to reply to my own comment. But, this seems relevant, since so many people talked about Marmite as an alternative or even "better" than Vegemite.

I just tried Marmite for the first time. It has roughly the same flavor, though a bit saltier, and smells quite a lot nastier.

In texture, it resembles caramel more than peanut butter. Personally, I find that somewhat annoying, as stretchy little strands cling to the container, making a sticky mess unless the eater takes great care to avoid it.

Overall, although I would consider Marmite an acceptible alternative for Vegemite, I'll go with the real thing if I have a choice.


[ Parent ]
Ah, Vegemite... (4.66 / 3) (#41)
by Mzilikazi on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:17:45 AM EST

I've never actually had it, but there were a half dozen Australians in my middle school (which makes no sense, as I live in Memphis, Tennessee), and all of them missed Vegemite and regularly sang its praises. I even remember something on TV from the same time period (late 80s) in which Elle McPherson talked about how much she loved Vegemite. Being a bundle of hormones at the time, I thought that the stuff must be the very nectar of the gods indeed if she liked it.

Still haven't tried it, or ever had the opportunity to try it, though... I'll check out a couple of the local vegetarian markets this week and see if they carry it. It's bound to be the one thing in the fridge that my roommate *doesn't* munch on while I'm at work. ;)

A question for the Ozzies out there: is vegemite a good "late night, already drunk, need something solid on the stomach" kind of food, or does it qualify as a decent "bad hangover, need something solid on the stomach to eliminate the shakes and headache" food in the morning? Or is it best enjoyed as far removed from alcohol as possible? I figure you boozing bastards ought to know*. ;)

Cheers,
Mzilikazi

*I'm of mixed Scottish & Irish descent, so I have absolutely no room to talk. And yes, I am buzzing at the moment.

Hangover vs drinking food (4.00 / 1) (#51)
by fink on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 01:46:57 AM EST

A question for the Ozzies out there: is vegemite a good "late night, already drunk, need something solid on the stomach" kind of food, or does it qualify as a decent "bad hangover, need something solid on the stomach to eliminate the shakes and headache" food in the morning? Or is it best enjoyed as far removed from alcohol as possible? I figure you boozing bastards ought to know*. ;)
Both. Really. Then again, I like the stuff so YMMV. Probably best as a hangover-recovery food though.

I am yet to find a better hangover cure... and the only thing I find that works better when drunk is a plate of greasy spring rolls and chips. With liberal amounts of sweet chilli sauce.

I figure you boozing bastards ought to know.
I resemble that remark. ;-) Although I have to say I'm yet to find a better spirit than good ol' irish whiskey... closely followed by a good shot of scotch.


----
[ Parent ]

Full English Breakfast (none / 0) (#154)
by DodgyGeezer on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 12:08:12 AM EST

There's only one thing that you can do with a hangover: eat a full English breakfast.

Although the "recipe" might sound familiar to N. Americans, there really is no comparison to be easily found over here: fried eggs (sunny side up for you N. Americans), fried sausages, fried black pudding, fried back (Danish?) bacon, baked beans (not that sickly sweet N. American stuff with ham), fried tomato, fried mushrooms... and the decider: fried bread that was used as sponge to clean up all of the oil, fat and drippings left in the pan after cooking everything else.

Since moving to Canada, I've had to give this delicacy up. Even if I cook it myself, I can't easily get the right ingredients. So, I've fallen back to a variation of my alternative hang over cure: hair of the dog. You can't beat sitting in the sun on the balcony drinking a Caesar in the morning.

[ Parent ]
Your Choice: heart attack or cirrhosis (none / 0) (#188)
by sydb on Mon Mar 18, 2002 at 02:01:21 PM EST

Either way you're screwed.
--

Making Linux GPL'd was definitely the best thing I ever did - Linus Torvalds
[ Parent ]

Recovery food (4.00 / 1) (#76)
by Coram on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:45:15 AM EST

It is more a recovery food. It's not greasy enough for a late night binge food but it is fantastic as a starter the morning after. It's great on toast as a prelude to some greasier recovery food.

--
judo ergo sum
[ Parent ]
The Pacific Sandwich and other stories (3.25 / 4) (#44)
by Jacques Chester on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:40:43 AM EST

The recipie for the Pacific Sandwich:

Take some peanut butter. Spread it on a slice of bread. Take some vegemite. Spread onto the peanut butter such that it mixes - it's difficult. Add another piece of bread, and eat.

Make sure you have a glass of water at hand. Peanut butter and vegemite react to create a totally unique substance. Tasty! But having amusing side effects.

The classic vegemite story:

An american businessman comes to work on a deal in Australia. During his stay in Sydney, Australian colleagues introduce him to Vegemite. At first he refuses to eat it - it smells funny, it's black, it's a joke, right? Then he finally eats some and he finds that he just loves it.

He rings his wife and tells her to try and find some in the states. A few days later, she calls back to tell him that Vegemite can't be found in the USA. Upset, he eventually buys a box of vegemite and sends home to his wife, arriving a week later.

He walks around for the house for a bit. Then, feeling like vegemite on toast, he asks his wife where the box is. "Oh" she says. "I opened the jars, and it was black and smelt bad. I figured they were off and threw them out".

--
In a world where an Idea can get you killed, Thinking is the most dangerous act of all.

Pacific Sandwiches (none / 0) (#49)
by Deus Horribilus on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 01:32:59 AM EST

I still cannot get over the fact that somebody apart from my housemate eats that, let alone there being a name for it... unfortunately it means that he steals both jars when he goes into his room to eat. I grew up with Vegemite, I can't live without the stuff. Strangely though, it is a topic that divides modern Australia, I know a guy that is the closest thing to a true blue Aussie country boy and he cannot stand the stuff. Weird. All this talk of Vegemite has made me hungry, I am going to get a Vegemite sandwich...

_________________________________________
"Beliefs are never concrete, they change direction like autumn leaves in a windstorm..."
[ Parent ]
They sell it premixed here. (none / 0) (#99)
by ambrosen on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 07:00:04 AM EST

I definitely had peanut butter with yeast extract ready-mixed when I was a teenager. I don't know if they sell it now.

--
Procrastination does not make you cool. Being cool makes you procrastinate. DesiredUsername.
[ Parent ]
CAUTGHT YOU! (5.00 / 1) (#53)
by gnovos on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:01:41 AM EST

"Oh" she says. "I opened the jars, and it was black and smelt bad. I figured they were off and threw them out".

When was the last time an American used the phrasal verb "go off" to mean "spoiled"?

A Haiku: "fuck you fuck you fuck/you fuck you fuck you fuck you/fuck you fuck you snow" - JChen
[ Parent ]

Only past tense (none / 0) (#118)
by Trevasel on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:10:19 AM EST

I'm from texas, and I usually use to go bad, or to spoil. If I do use to be off, it's only in the past tense. I don't think I've ever used to go off. Just a little bit of southern usage information for you all.

Oh, and nutella is rocking, I will have to try vegemite (or marmite, can't really find vegemite too easily) spread thin -- I guess I've always used too much of it.
-- That which does not kill you only makes you stranger - Trevor Goodchild
[ Parent ]

Drop bear repellent (4.66 / 27) (#46)
by Lode Runner on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:41:27 AM EST

Vegemite is disgusting in even the smallest amount. But that's to be expected because it's really not meant for human consumption. Rather, it's used to keep the drop bears away! They don't like the smell of Vegemite.

So here's the deal:

American shows up for a tour of the Outback.

Australians feed American a heaping spoonful of Vegemite.

American gags.

Australians laugh and tell American that Vegemite isn't food and laugh some more about American gullibility.

American asks what Vegemite is for.

Australians are shocked by question and then tell American in most the condescending tone that Vegemite is for keeping the drop koalas away.

"What are drop koalas?" asks naive American?

Australians explain that koalas are predators, but because they are so slow, they must climb trees and wait patiently for a victim to pass underneath. Then they drop!

American is shocked, "But they're so docile-looking on TV."

"Don't let that fool you," the Australians reply. "Bruce here, he knows..." Bruce displays hideous scar on his back.

American expresses reservations about going into the woods.

Australians tell American to relax. The only reason Bruce was attacked was that he didn't apply enough Vegemite.

Australians then pass the jar of Vegemite around, smearing liberal amounts of the gunk on their necks and shoulders.

American applies Vegemite too, of course.

Everybody, now covered with the proper amount of Vegemite, goes off to the woods for a day, and the Vegemite attracts swarms of nasty, biting insects.

American complains about the bugs.

Austrialians tell him that bugs bites are better than drop bear bites. Bruce was in the hospital for a full month, you know.

By sunset, everybody's upper bodies are covered with thousands of little bumps.

Nevermind a shower, the Australians insist, let's go straight for a beer.

Australians and American enter pub, the whole population of which explodes in laughter.

Explanations are made and there is much ribbing.

American expresses amazement at Australians who endured thousands of bug bites just to play a practical joke.

Australians explain that the pain was worth it because it gave the hosts something to look forward to after a long day of playing tour-guide.

Consumption of beer commences. Frequent allusions are made to drop koalas, each followed by gales of laughter...

It's an odd place, Australia.



coming from a 1/2 sepo (4.16 / 6) (#47)
by cicero on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 01:10:38 AM EST

I feel that it my duty to inform you that I hate vegimite because it tastes like crap.

if americans spread something as pungent and foul tasting as vegimite, I'd hate that too.

(the 1/2 sepo thing, for those who don't know, is short for septic tank -> yank -> american. i'm also 1/2 aussie, which is where I got the sepo thing, as well as my strong distaste for vegimite, from).


--
I am sorry Cisco, for Microsoft has found a new RPC flaw - tonight your e0 shall be stretched wide like goatse.
Vegemite Recipe (3.75 / 4) (#52)
by freakie on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 01:56:56 AM EST

Take vegemite - toss in garbage recepticle. Remove said garbage recepticle from household. Deposit in commercial refuse pickup container....

Stuff is nasty!! Of course, I'm the odd-ball in my family - the rest of them actually eat the stuff and think it tastes good. Ewwwww!!! YUCK!


"Give'm Etch-a-Sketches...they'll never know the difference!"

Hungry (2.33 / 3) (#57)
by froseph on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:29:39 AM EST

Good riddence! It's late at night, I'm hungry in my dorm room without food, and this talk of Vegemite is not doing anything to help it. Althought I have never heard of it before in my life. Sounds tasty though... where can I get some cheap?

Food (2.00 / 1) (#60)
by zsau on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:42:35 AM EST

Good riddence! It's late at night, I'm hungry in my dorm room without food, and this talk of Vegemite is not doing anything to help it. Althought I have never heard of it before in my life. Sounds tasty though... where can I get some cheap?
We get it from our local supermarket, but if you're in America, you'll have some trouble getting it, I understand. Poor Americans, no Vegemite, no Tim Tams, no Milo. What do you eat?

[ Parent ]
The American version of the Aussie Vegemitarian (none / 0) (#110)
by stinkwrinkle on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:59:42 AM EST

Poor Americans, no Vegemite, no Tim Tams, no Milo. What do you eat?

Offal.

And when someone at the table discards the part you just wolfed down, you put a look of mingled shock and pity on your face, and say, "...but... ...but... that's the *best part*!!!!"

[ Parent ]
No Moccona Either (none / 0) (#180)
by cam on Sat Mar 16, 2002 at 11:18:31 PM EST

Poor Americans, no Vegemite, no Tim Tams, no Milo. What do you eat?

No Moccona either, if anyone knows where it can be bought off the web, I would like to know. I use aussieproducts.com to buy myself red cross packages. But they dont stock Moccona. America has great perculated coffee, but the instant variety is pretty weak.

cam
Freedom, Liberty, Equity and an Australian Republic
[ Parent ]

I get... (3.66 / 3) (#62)
by Kaki Nix Sain on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:54:56 AM EST

... all the vitamins that you mentioned, in full RDA, from the mulivitamin pill that I take each day. You can keep your silly vegimite.



Would somebody in the know... (3.66 / 3) (#63)
by mirleid on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:55:23 AM EST

...try to explain the difference between Aussie crap (Vegemite) and Brit crap (Marmite)?
I've tried them both, and, in my opinion, both stink, but anyway, just out of curiosity...

Chickens don't give milk
Marmite is stronger (4.75 / 4) (#70)
by bc on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:01:05 AM EST

Than vegemite. Vegemite also has artificial colourings added. I have tried both, and there is no doubt that Marmite is stronger. Even the ingredients show that Marmite is denser.

In addition, Marmite is the original, being the first commercially produced yeast extract spread in the world. It tastes beefier, whereas vegemite tastes more like vegetables.

Marmite is made all over the world, but often to different ingredients. New Zealand Marmite, for example, is literaly watered down, probably to suit palettes more used to the weaker vegemite. Australian Marmite may have smiliar defects; the British produced Marmite is the original, and all other yeast extract spreads the world over are pale immitations, imho.

♥, bc.
[ Parent ]

I was raised on Marmite (3.33 / 3) (#72)
by davidmb on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:14:41 AM EST

I bought a jar of Vegemite once. The first taste made me feel ill. I had to go and eat half a ton of Marmite to wash away the taste. Marmite good, Vegemite bad.
־‮־
[ Parent ]
Certainly (3.66 / 3) (#80)
by synaesthesia on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:04:30 AM EST

Marmite is delicious, and Vegemite is minging.

Sausages or cheese?
[ Parent ]
Vegemite in Las Vegas Nevada USA (2.00 / 2) (#64)
by Angelic Upstart on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 03:05:09 AM EST

I've never had it and I doubt I never will the stuff just looks to nasty but I have alot of aussie and brit friends here *theres a large group of aussies in vegas* and they get it at this special store here. We have milo and tim tams? or whatever they are called too. Tim tams are pretty good tho.

The Real Australian Delicacy... (4.33 / 6) (#65)
by ikeaboy on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 03:24:47 AM EST

... is Tim Tams. Vegemite is a close second though.

And if you're an ex-pat Australian overseas (or a mad foreigner with a taste for them) you can buy them online from Arnotts. There are some Australia Shops around, esp in the UK, but the markup tends to be enormous.

Perhaps a lobby group of ex-pat Aussies should lobby Kraft.AU to do the same for Vegemite...

Not hard to find in the UK. (none / 0) (#97)
by ambrosen on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:55:47 AM EST

Vegemite is available in every branch of Sainsbury's I go to, and I think Tescos, too. I'm sure it's only because they have to have more than one variety of yeast extract on the shelves rather than any self-respecting Brits buying it in place of Marmite.

--
Procrastination does not make you cool. Being cool makes you procrastinate. DesiredUsername.
[ Parent ]
World Market stocks Vegemite (none / 0) (#125)
by cam on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:25:36 PM EST

Perhaps a lobby group of ex-pat Aussies should lobby Kraft.AU to do the same for Vegemite...

In North Virginia, World Market stocks Vegemite in the 175g and 455g jars. I buy them in bulk and hand them around to my American friends as presents or gifts. House warmings, cook-outs, baby showers, bucks nights, meaningless gift nights, birthdays, xmas, you name it, a $2 jar of vegemite is more memorable than any other gift.

World Market also stocks a good amount of Australian wines and Sheaf Stout. None of the Australian domestic lagers though, which is a shame.

cam
Freedom, Liberty, Equity and an Australian Republic
[ Parent ]

I hate to burst your bubble . . . (none / 0) (#140)
by Hamstache on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:28:07 PM EST

But Tim-Tams is now the property of the good 'ol US of A! That's right! Arnott's, which manufactures Tim-Tams was acquired by Campbell's Soup Co. a few years back. Which effectively makes Tim-Tams about as Australian as . . . Foster's.

[ Parent ]
You'll have to do better than that! (none / 0) (#153)
by D Jade on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:56:14 PM EST

But Tim-Tams is now the property of the good 'ol US of A! That's right!

I think that you will find that Vegemite is owned and produced by Kraft, another American company.

We also know about the US ownership of Arnotts, because the Yanks closed down one of the factories, or something like that, just a couple of years ago.

Just becuase another country owns the product, doesn't mean that it's not still ours. Besides, better to get someone else to make such a volatile substance as Vegemite than risk getting it on our own hands.

You're a shitty troll, so stop pretending you have more of a life than a cool dude -- HollyHopDrive
[ Parent ]

Not just for eating (4.00 / 10) (#66)
by sigh71 on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 03:30:09 AM EST

Vegemite is also pretty handy for keeping your cpu cool.
vegemite as a thermal transfer

Now all the Brits are getting to work (4.80 / 15) (#69)
by davidmb on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 03:59:56 AM EST

It's time to slag off Vegemite, and point out that the one true yeast extract is Marmite.

Marmite pre-dates Vegemite by 20 years, leading me to conclude that Vegemite was a cheap Ozzie knock-off. In addition, Vegemite tastes absolutely awful compared to Marmite, which is the food of the Gods.
־‮־

Cricket (3.62 / 8) (#81)
by Scrymarch on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:05:40 AM EST

Like cricket and many other wonderful British inventions, Marmite had to leave the country to reach its full potential. Now Vegemite thrashes it all over the park. I wonder if the sub-continent has a local yeast extract spread ...

As an aside, I this story seems to provide some evidence for the existence of regional k5 voting factions organised by timezone.

[ Parent ]

Marmite versus Vegemite (4.50 / 2) (#90)
by fink on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:08:36 AM EST

Marmite pre-dates Vegemite by 20 years, leading me to conclude that Vegemite was a cheap Ozzie knock-off.
You got that right. Originally, Vegemite was to be called "Pawill", supposedly as a cheap pun on Marmite.

If you don't get it, try this for size: Ma might, but Pa will.

Don't know the truth behind it; chances are you'll find more "factual" info somewhere like Snopes.

Me? I can't stand Marmite, Promite, or any non-Vegemite variant. Always had trouble tolerating them. Love Vegemite though.


----
[ Parent ]

"Essential Britishness" of Marmite (5.00 / 5) (#96)
by hotseat on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:45:48 AM EST

British marmite fans on K5 will be pleased to know that no fewer than 30 members of the House of Commons have signed Early Day Motion 884, which reads:

That this House notes that 2002 marks the 100th anniversary of the creation of Marmite; takes intense satisfaction from the essential Britishness of the product and its lack of appeal for the majority of the world's population; and looks forward to another century of the wonderful savoury being spread over soldiers and crumpets.
It's good to know that our elected representatives have such important matters on their minds...

Tom (staunch Marmite supporter)

[ Parent ]

The Australians took over last night I see (4.64 / 14) (#71)
by davidmb on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:03:34 AM EST

Witness one Vegemite story on the front page with a slew of pro-Vegemite comments. There is no way this should be allowed, Marmite is a far superior product.
־‮־
Poor people's food (3.10 / 10) (#74)
by mlapanadras on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:29:20 AM EST

When someone is starting to explain you that some particular product is healthy, full of calories, vitamins and will make your life better, don't let them fool you. It is just another advertising/marketing campaign and all they want from you is your money.

It is simply amazing how blind you people can be. And it is even more amazing what kind of crap you are ready to eat just to get your daily portion of Natrium Glutamate(I hope at least Vegemite doesn't contain it?).

There is a "poor people's" food (Vegemite, Pringles, Kellogg's, Coca-Cola and similar, all those fancy boxes and bottles) made from oil and leftovers and there is a real food, made from real crops, the real food made in the way our ancestors did it.

It is up to you - to be a slave and eat whatever they feed to you, or to be a master of your own stomach.

Sorry guys, you're messed. (4.33 / 3) (#75)
by Quixato on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:34:32 AM EST

I spent a year in Australia recently, and have come to love all that's Aussie, with the exception of vegemite of course. I mean come on, how exactly can you enjoy a spread with the look and consistency of lightly boiled tar, and the delicate taste of sweaty balls?

I'm sure however that if I was raised to enjoy something like molasas spread on toast, I'd be sitting here going what the hell are you guys talking about? It's delicious! But I haven't, and you guys have. Kudos to you though for keeping a part of your heritage alive, all us Canadians have is the word 'touque', besides that we're basically americans (albeit without guns).

"People are like smarties - all different colours on the outside, but exactly the same on the inside." - Me
"Learn to question, question to learn." - Sl8r

Re: Sorry guys, you're messed. (3.75 / 4) (#78)
by Coram on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:54:30 AM EST

>all us Canadians have is the word 'touque', besides that we're basically americans (albeit without guns).

And you say 'about' funny. ;)

--
judo ergo sum
[ Parent ]
Absolutely (4.00 / 1) (#111)
by Quixato on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 09:13:14 AM EST

noo doot aboot it!

"People are like smarties - all different colours on the outside, but exactly the same on the inside." - Me
"Learn to question, question to learn." - Sl8r
[ Parent ]

ROFL LMFAO (none / 0) (#130)
by eurasian on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:12:12 PM EST

yes yes.. too true. we also produce the most divas/capita -celine dion -deborah cox -alanis morrisette -that lady from Timmins Ontario?? short gal.. ugh, country singer, Shania Twain -that lady from Victoria? uhm.. really nasally at times.. man, i really bite at names, Nelly Furtato hm, miss anyone? also produce the zaniest comedians (didn't say funniest, just zany) -that guy on the Mask, rubbery fellow, Jim Carrey -guy that produces SNL -dan ackroyd (well, ok, he's not really that zany, not since he did that show on the Avro Arrow) but we also say Car really funny too. actually, all these accents are attributable to Eastern canadians in my experience. but u can just lump us all together. :)

[ Parent ]
Tradition (4.00 / 2) (#92)
by myyth on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:22:32 AM EST

I cant remember the first time I tasted vegemite, but I remember scraping a little onto my pinky finger and giving my son a taste when he was about eight months old ... Im sure my parents (and many others) have done the same. He (now four and a half) his sister (18 months) and all of their friends love vegemite sandwiches.

To tell you the truth, I always think people (Aussies) who dont like vegemite are a little wierd.

[ Parent ]

Sorry guys, you're messed. (none / 0) (#109)
by deaddrunk on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:48:11 AM EST

And saying eh? after every sentence :)

[ Parent ]
Sweaty balls? (none / 0) (#151)
by DodgyGeezer on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:48:56 PM EST

OOOOOHHHH! I don't even want to know how you found out what sweaty balls taste like.

[ Parent ]
Never actually tasted it, but I can imagine... (none / 0) (#175)
by Quixato on Sat Mar 16, 2002 at 05:30:25 AM EST

I scratch my crotch, I sniff my fingers, any questions?

"People are like smarties - all different colours on the outside, but exactly the same on the inside." - Me
"Learn to question, question to learn." - Sl8r
[ Parent ]

Vegemite web site (4.22 / 9) (#77)
by Coram on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:51:53 AM EST

www.vegemite.com.au The best bit is the jingle.


--
judo ergo sum
Vegemite is real? (3.33 / 6) (#79)
by halo64 on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:58:20 AM EST

This whole time I thought vegemite was a joke. Personally, I prefer to spread butter on my bread. I don't eat food because "it is good for me." I eat food because I am hungry, hence my strict diet of nicotine, caffeine, alcohol and cholestorol, with a side of preservatives. I take vitamins because they are good for me and they go great with Absolute Citron and 7-Up.

/* begin sig here
I don't have one because I'm lame
finish sig here */

umm (none / 0) (#132)
by Rainy on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 03:00:52 PM EST

It's a false dichotomy: you can eat some food both because you're hungry and it's good for you.
--
Rainy "Collect all zero" Day
[ Parent ]
True . . . (none / 0) (#168)
by halo64 on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 12:56:19 PM EST

Food can be eaten because it is good for you, but I'd rather eat something because I enjoy eating it. There's been a lot of studies done that if you just eat what you like and don't over eat, then you should never really have health problems because of your diet. That is unless you only eat bowls of Crisco and drink maple syrup straight from the jug.

/* begin sig here
I don't have one because I'm lame
finish sig here */
[ Parent ]

What's health? (none / 0) (#170)
by Rainy on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 03:58:54 PM EST

I think the very meaning of the word got corrupted. Health is when you never need to rest and yet you never feel tired or bored.

"Enjoy" is not a simple word, either. There's this thing called "aquired taste". There's a difference between enjoying what you eat and eating what you enjoy.

Food is a drug. I wouldn't refuse a tab of E because it tastes bitter, I'd give much more consideration to its effects. YMMV
--
Rainy "Collect all zero" Day
[ Parent ]

Promite > * > Vegemite (1.33 / 3) (#83)
by acb on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:11:12 AM EST

Thank you.

--- acb #kuro5hin
Promite is better for the uninitiated (none / 0) (#158)
by haakon on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 03:57:37 AM EST

It's less salty than Vegemite but still has that delicious flavour.

I certainly prefer Promite over Vegemite.

[ Parent ]
Real people eat Bovril (2.66 / 3) (#84)
by amanset on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:23:35 AM EST

Surely Marmite is just for people who can't handle the meaty goodness of Bovril? oh, and vegetarians. It has the added bonus of being both a drink and a foodstuff.

Well (none / 0) (#89)
by FredBloggs on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:58:43 AM EST

if you`re a vegetarian, or dont have the courage to play the Mad Cow Roulette, then Marmite is your man! :)

[ Parent ]
Some countries more at risk than UK for BSE (none / 0) (#149)
by DodgyGeezer on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:45:45 PM EST

I would be more worried about the Mad Cow Roulette if the Bovril came from:

* France where they're still feeding ground up spinal material to their cows

* or the USA, where the agricultural people (greedy unionists?) claim there is not risk and nothing to worry about, even though they're not taking the most basic preventative measures that the British government introduced in 1984.

[ Parent ]
Marmite can be made into a hot drink too (none / 0) (#98)
by davidmb on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:58:04 AM EST

I used to drink it occasionally when I was little. But you've got a point about Bovril, I'm partial to a Bovril sandwich now and again.
־‮־
[ Parent ]
It's got 3 damn vitamins! (4.25 / 4) (#85)
by sticky on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:24:14 AM EST

And you're almost making it out to be an essential part of a healthy diet? You want thiamine, niacin and riboflavin? Eat cereal in the morning. I've never seen or tasted vegemite, but something that salty couldn't be good for you.

Do you work for the company that makes that stuff or are you just a hopeless sucker for marketing?


Don't eat the shrimp.---God
No it's healthy! Seriously! (4.00 / 1) (#102)
by tenpo on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:13:04 AM EST

It's only too salty if you put too much on! Why won't people understand! Too much of anything is unhealthy. Vegemite is concentrated so what you think is 'enough' is probably just too much. But people seem to just assume that since vegemite goes on toast you can just dollop it on - the more the better. Sadly, with vegemite this is untrue. As the writer says, a little goes a long way! I find that if you put a bit of butter on toast and just keep adding tiny bits of vegemite, mixing it with the butter until it goes a a light dirty brown colour tastes excellent. If it's looking dark (or even black!) you've put too much on. Go back and try again.

In regards to it being healthy, it's recommended as part a healthy diet by the NSW Health Council and listed for preferred consumption for diabetics; It's also rumoured to be an effective hangover cure (as almost everything imaginable is, in some form or another...). All this among other interesting properties.

All in all, it's recommended by many medical professionals for anyone who's growing, active, pregnant or otherwise alive in some way as being a good addition to a healthy diet. Before you ask: no, i don't work for Kraft, I'm just an aussie who would like to see some others enjoying a nice bit of vegemite on toast now and again as i do. cheers :)

[ Parent ]
Vegemite is above marketing (4.33 / 3) (#150)
by D Jade on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:47:13 PM EST

Do you work for the company that makes that stuff or are you just a hopeless sucker for marketing?

There is usually only one advertisement a year for Vegemite dude. Everyone knows the song, "It puts a rose in every cheek!"

Vegemite is an Australian icon. It ties in heavily with other icons such as King Gee Stubbies and the old Stubbie holder. (It is important to note that the stubbie holder holds your beer, and not your shorts.)

We are a nation that loves beer. So I logically assume that something needs to be done with all of the yeast extracty stuff at the bottom of the "bewry" vats. This way, not only do we consume oceans of beer, we also protect ourselves from being over-run by yeast extracty stuff.. which is good, because anyone that has been to South Yarra station can tell you that mountains of yeasty stuff smells.

I will stop now, because I have lost the point of this post.

note - bewry is Australian for Brewery :)

You're a shitty troll, so stop pretending you have more of a life than a cool dude -- HollyHopDrive
[ Parent ]

Bone to pick (none / 0) (#187)
by SoupIsGoodFood on Mon Mar 18, 2002 at 07:15:16 AM EST

It also has lot's of other vitamins, and is a good source of iron to.
BTW, you would probably die if you had no salt in your diet. Did you know that some health suppliments even have metals like nikel and cadnium in them? Have you never heard the phrase a balanced diet? You body needs salt, just like it needs other things. The key is not to have to much (just like you can have too much of everything else).
Repeat after me: Balanced....diet...

Marketing? How can you even judge something when you don't know anyting about it? Vegimite and Marmite have been around for years. Hell, I can't even remember the last time I saw an add for vegemite. It's just a well knowen fact that vegemite is good for you (in moderation of course).

[ Parent ]

Yeast extracts from other countries... (4.00 / 5) (#86)
by wilton on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:30:39 AM EST

In New Zealand you can also get pro-mite, vegemite and marmite, the local marmite is different from the UK variety.
In Germany it is called Hefe-Extract, and you buy it in health food stores. It tends to come flavoured with herbs like sage, thyme etc.

Other super-healthy gross looking foods... (4.25 / 4) (#87)
by wilton on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:34:31 AM EST

Whilst in New Zealand, I also discovered Spirulina (?). Apparently this stuff is the healthiest thing you can eat/drink. It comes mixed with fruit juice, tastes great, and makes you feel even better.
Does anyone know if you can buy it in the UK ?? From what I have seen, some people call it blue-green algae, and comes in powder form.
What sort of quantities should you mix to recreate the New Zealand drink ??

Will

Health food stores (none / 0) (#106)
by radghast on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:32:02 AM EST

I saw it in the bulk herbs at a local health food store. Didn't try it, though -- the stuff was $21 a pound! Hope you don't have to use a lot of it...
"It remains to be seen if the human brain is powerful enough to solve the problems it has created." -- Dr. Richard Wallace
[ Parent ]
Spirulina Smoothie (none / 0) (#177)
by wbd on Sat Mar 16, 2002 at 07:10:28 AM EST

Google that. Spirulina tastes like dried blue-green algae so you need something to cover the taste - Banana, apricot, & kiwifruit are traditional I beleve.

from: http://nutmeg.gen.nz/recipes/recipe.html?ID=6
get a blender. put in it: 1 banana 1 1/2 cups apple juice an orange, or so 2 tsp spirulina powder [substitute with whatever fruit you have, canned or fresh. experiment.] blend lots until blended. drink.

[ Parent ]

No no no! (3.37 / 8) (#88)
by hstink on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 05:35:20 AM EST

As a practising Australian, I must report that Vegemite is the most downright wrong "food" I have come into contact with. You're better off using it as axle grease than ingesting it.

That is all.

-h

Vegemite on toast HOWTO (4.00 / 7) (#91)
by myyth on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:11:31 AM EST

I ate vegemite sandwiches for lunch almost every day for my entire 12 years at school. I actually demanded vegemite over any other sandwich filler. When ever mum tried to be "creative" and vary the contents of my sandwiches there would be some serious words when I arrived home.

A grown up now, I still have vegemite almost every day. We have a toaster in our office (I teach computing at a Sydney high school) and it's a daily ritual to make vegemite on toast (usually mid-morning) and a nice hot cup of tea. Our office often has visitors (from other staff rooms) and perfectly made vegemite toast is a must.

There's actually a number of (equally delicious) ways to prepare vegemite on toast.

1. (my favourite) Toast the bread until golden. While the bread is still very hot, butter the toast (with real butter of course - never use margarine) so that the butter melts and soaks in. Use enough butter so that the melted butter forms molten pools. Now add a very thin smear of vegemite to the bread. Note: It is "not" necessary to cover the bread with vegemite. Its quite strong tasting so a few dabs or smears, here and there, are enough. The vegemite will pool with the warm melted butter forming a delicious fatty salty brownish liquid. Best eaten immediately. Take care when picking up the toast so as not to spill too much of the melted butter/vegemite. You know you have got it right when the melted butter/vegemite trickles over the edge of the bread and down your arm.

2. (which I learnt from my maternal grandfather - no kidding!!) Toast the bread until it is quite dark - a little burnt is ok. Leave the toast to cool. Its best to take the bread out of the toaster to cool as, for some reason, the bread will go quite stiff if left in the toaster. Before it is stone cold, butter the toast with butter (again, don't bother with margarine). Make sure you cover the bread well. Now, smear the vegemite over the butter. Its ok to use more vegemite here - especially if you've burnt the toast a little. A good even cover is important. You know you've done it right when you've just finished the fourth slice of toast and are picking butter/vegemite encrusted toast crumbs off the table and thinking to yourself "I'll just make `one' more

3. (for mid-summer when its too hot for toast) Go down to the shop and buy a fresh loaf of white sliced bread (I usually eat wholemeal but you really should use white for this one) - make sure its really fresh. While you're there, pick up a packet of "Kraft" brand cheddar cheese slices - individually wrapped. The kraft brand cheddar cheese is an essential ingredient as this "cheese" resembles real cheese in the same way a "Big Mac" resembles a real hamburger (sheesh, a big mac doesn't even have beetroot on it!). Butter two slices of bread - not too much. Spread a good smear of vegemite on one slice and add the "cheese" slice. Put the top slice on and CUT OFF THE CRUST !! You know you've got this right when you can wrap the sandwich in glad-wrap, put it in a lunch box, put the lunch box into a kids bag and leave it there for a month and then eat it and it still tastes absolutely delicious (this explains the need for kraft cheddar cheese as there is no way its going to go mouldy - the same way a big mac, if wrapped in plastic wont go mouldy).

These recipes should get you started. Once you've mastered these you may want to branch out to vegemite toast with hard boiled eggs, vegemite on really crusty French bread, vegemite on English muffins.

wow. (none / 0) (#143)
by spilk on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 10:20:03 PM EST

i usually have a pretty strong stomach and can tolerate a lot, but i think i will never eat again after reading that.

[ Parent ]
Marmite? (none / 0) (#148)
by DodgyGeezer on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:39:48 PM EST

I discovered your number 1 recipe in later teen years. I think I prefer being much more liberal with the amounts of Marmite though. Marmite and toast is just perfect when one gets the late night munchies after consuming certain herbs that some countries wage an expensive war against. Your 3rd recipe is similar to one of my favourite lunches. You just can't beat Marmite and cheese sandwhiches. I don't touch that Kraft PVC cheese though, as that really is digusting.

[ Parent ]
Vegemite on Weet-bix (none / 0) (#182)
by cam on Sat Mar 16, 2002 at 11:25:32 PM EST

There's actually a number of (equally delicious) ways to prepare vegemite

Afternoon tea when coming home from school used to be Vegemite on Weetbix for me.

cam
Freedom, Liberty, Equity and an Australian Republic
[ Parent ]

Yuck! (4.33 / 6) (#100)
by bobothy on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 07:30:25 AM EST

I'm an Australian, and do not personally know anyone that actually likes Vegemite. The last time I _tried_ to eat some, I ended up dry retching for half an hour. It is the most disgusting, caustic, foul stuff I have ever come accross. I would rather eat brussel sprouts.

It does sorta have a few good points though- It's excellent for torturing Americans. We get a lot American tourists over here, and most don't really represent their country very well (i.e. they tend to be incredibly stupid). We give them the big Vegemite speach about how it's our favourite food and whatever, and give them some. It's incredibly hilarious when they try and stomach it, but can't, and think they have offended us or something.



heheh! (4.00 / 1) (#104)
by tenpo on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:17:32 AM EST

It's true. Never accept a piece of toast from an Australian that's been covered in a suspicious brown substance...

I know that i'm also guilty of this shameful, cruel and incredibly amusing prank.

[ Parent ]
Do you guys get Dingoes in your Backyard??? (5.00 / 2) (#147)
by D Jade on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:37:37 PM EST

It's excellent for torturing Americans. We get a lot American tourists over here, and most don't really represent their country very well (i.e. they tend to be incredibly stupid).

My favorite American-tourist game is to tell them about the Koala that lives in my lounge room, and the dingoes in the back yard...

The sad thing I tell them about the flock of Emues that guard my front gate and the Kangaroo I ride on the weekends, they believe me.

I went out on a limb once and tried to tell one yank that my Koala was a bong-smoking dole bludger who only ever left the couch to go get more leaf from the Gum tree out back... he didn't believe me though.

You're a shitty troll, so stop pretending you have more of a life than a cool dude -- HollyHopDrive
[ Parent ]

"acquired taste" (4.50 / 2) (#101)
by jayhawk88 on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:06:47 AM EST

Vegemite is an aquired taste so start small.
Even seasoned vegemite eaters have trouble with the stuff eating it raw in huge amounts.
If you must eat vegemite raw, try using your index finger to scrape the stuff from underneath the inner top of the jar.

Maybe it's just me, but if a food has things like this said about it, in an article designed to convince us try it, I'm not likely to start eating it anytime soon. Call me old fashioned (or closed minded even), but the foods I regularly eat generally must at least look and taste good on first inspection.

Why, then, should we grant government the Orwellian capability to listen at will and in real time to our communications across the Web? -- John Ashcroft
first timer, eh? (4.00 / 1) (#103)
by tenpo on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:15:21 AM EST

Did you enjoy your first coffee or beer? You know, when you were ten or twelve and you wanted to try a bit of dad or mum's? I know i didn't. I enjoy it now though, and prefer it on occaision to anything else in the world. Same principle applies here, methinks.

[ Parent ]
coffee and beer (3.50 / 2) (#113)
by jayhawk88 on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 10:00:46 AM EST

Coffee sucks, but I will admit I didn't much care for the first beer I drank. But then, when your 14 you don't exactly drink beer for the taste. 14 year old boys would drink their own piss if it got them wasted.

Why, then, should we grant government the Orwellian capability to listen at will and in real time to our communications across the Web? -- John Ashcroft
[ Parent ]
or... (none / 0) (#139)
by tenpo on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 06:35:01 PM EST

more like they'd drink their own piss if everyone else was drinking it. Hell, I know at that time i probably *would* have jumped off a cliff if everyone else was doing it.

[ Parent ]
good point (4.00 / 1) (#152)
by locke baron on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:53:48 PM EST

Coffee I actually did like the first time I tried it. I wasn't wild about it, and I sure didn't get why some people couldn't go a day without it (for the record, at the time I was an avid tea and Pepsi drinker, so I understood the whole caffeine angle). I'm still not as keen on coffee as some, but I do enjoy it now and again. Beer is a completely different story - I thought it tasted like skunk urine the first time I tried it. My opinion has changed though - now I think it tastes like skunk /vomit/... Other alcohols are sometimes quite agreeable however (try Bailey's Irish Creme and coffee... that's a good combo.)

Micro$oft uses Quake clannies to wage war on Iraq! - explodingheadboy
[ Parent ]
Shameless line lifting (4.00 / 2) (#107)
by Rand Race on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:35:47 AM EST

"Vegemite is an aquired taste ..."

The way I see it any taste can be aquired, but who the hell wants to?

Thank Michael Almereyda for that little jewel. Now to start on my grits article...

Grits, some think this food is suitable only for inbred albino banjo-pickin' crackers who drink applesauce through straws. But, unlike the deadly poisonous oatmeal, grits are actually good for you. Made from the finest kernals of maize, picked by scantily clad redneck virgins, grits are the very foodstuff of the Gods. Granted they are Gods of tobacco spitting and overalls, but they are Gods nontheless....


"Question with boldness even the existence of God; because if there be one, He must approve the homage of Reason rather than that of blindfolded Fear." - Thomas Jefferson
[ Parent ]

No, no, not grits. (none / 0) (#112)
by watchmaker on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 09:15:35 AM EST

Call it polenta, and you can charge much much more per plate.

Granted, Grits come from Hominy (Corn soaked in lye) and Polenta comes from, I believe, Corn soaked in, well, nothing. But the idea is pretty much the same.

My favorite way to have grits is when it's cooled, formed into slices and fried. Around here, that's called Fried Mush. Mmmm, now I'm hungry for some Biscuits, Sausage Gravy, and thick slices of bacon (Chewy, not crispy) with a side of mush.

[ Parent ]

acquired taste might equal understanding (none / 0) (#146)
by D Jade on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:32:51 PM EST

I think that they are trying to say that Vegemite is a substance that must first be understood before it can be appreciated for what it is.

It is a very strong flavour, and it is not that good by itself. Its flavour is enhanced by using butter as well... If you smother too much Vegemite on the bread, you will not have the right balance.

So because so little Vegemite is required per slice of toast, I only need to restock once a month. Compared to once a week for my peanut butter.



You're a shitty troll, so stop pretending you have more of a life than a cool dude -- HollyHopDrive
[ Parent ]
The Swiss have it too... (4.00 / 3) (#105)
by Alias on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 08:20:10 AM EST

It's called Cenovis here. They claim it has been invented in 1931 by a beer brewer.

I eat mine on thin slices of Valais rye-and-nut-bread. Mmm.


Stéphane "Alias" Gallay -- Damn! My .sig is too lon

Healthy? (3.75 / 4) (#114)
by watchmaker on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 10:04:33 AM EST

There are alot of things I should eat because they are healthy.

Bananas are high in potassium, but I can't stand the texture of a banana, it makes me gag.

Spinach is what makes popeye so strong, and yet I couldn't eat it to save my life.

Hell, there's people out there who believe that the uric acid you gain by drinking your own urine has mystical health benefits.

Each morning I take four of these.

Let's see using your numbers, vegemite has a quarter of the Niacin I need. With my vitamins, I get 1.5x the USRDA.

(As a side note, the USRDA values are heinously low for the average healthy adult.)

Thiamin 2000%, Riboflavin 1675%, Pantothenic Acid 300%, B6 1500%. I haven't a clue what Folacin is and suspect it may be Folic Acid, in which case I get 100%. The only thing I don't get 100% of the USRDA on is Biotin at 83%.

I also get things like the prostate friendly Saw Palmetto, heart friendly garlic, brain friendly Ginseng and Choline, And a whole host of other fun stuff that vegemite doesn't have.

But the biggest bonus of all, it's four pills. Pop them in the mouth, take a drink of water, and they're gone. At no point am I forced to eat something that tastes like it came out of an Aborigine's ass.



poppin them vitamin pills (4.00 / 1) (#117)
by spacemoose on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 10:56:03 AM EST

Hey mon. One thing worth considering: vegemite is a food source of vitamins. Because your body didn't evolve to eat pills, your body and only make use of vitamins when they are digested with other vitamins, enzymes, fats that they are normally found with. Me I take brewers yeast which is the base of vegmite. Shake er up in some apple juice and it's okay. As far as the pills: Probably you aren't using most of what you swallow (is you pee more yellow when you take the vitamins than when you don't?). One way you can increase the chance of absorbing them puppies is to take pills with a good meal (maybe you're doing that already), or at least a glass of milk (or something with a little fat in it anway-- esp for vit e and d) cheers

[ Parent ]
Bit of a waste, though? (none / 0) (#162)
by gordonjcp on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 06:23:27 AM EST

Me I take brewers yeast which is the base of vegmite. Shake er up in some apple juice and it's okay.
I prefer to let the brewer's yeast work on the apple juice first. Better still, some brewed malted grain. Mmmm, beeeer....
I used to live next to a really good microbrewery. That was really bad for my wealth.
(incidentally, that's UK beer, not US beer. US beer is more like what we call lager, but it's not lager either)

Give a man a fish, and he'll eat for a day. Teach a man to fish, and he'll bore you rigid with fishing stories for the rest of your life.


[ Parent ]
Too late, but... (4.00 / 3) (#115)
by jethro on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 10:11:35 AM EST

I never ate vegamite, but I pretty much grew up forced to eat marmite sandwiches (thanks, mom!)

Anyway, I hate the stuff, and for the record, I hate peanut butter too.

I'm actually not too crazy about sandwiches. When I _do_ eat sandwiches they tend to be either

(A) Baked Tofu sandwiches, or

(B) Something most people would find even MORE gross than that.

With cheese, tomatos and spinach, or whatever leafy green my wife decided to get today. And I'm fairly sure that if she reads this article she'd be willing to try marmite.

--
In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is kinky.
Marmite/Vegemite vs Unspecified German Lookalike (4.50 / 2) (#120)
by GrassyKnoll on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:01:59 PM EST

When I lived in Germany for a year in the '80s, we used to get something that looked very much like Marmite, but was actually very sweet rather than salty, so you could spread loads of it on a slice of bread. I don't know what it was called, but it came in yellow plastic tubs, much larger than marmite jars.

When a friend from Germany came to stay shortly after my return to England, at breakfast he picked up the Marmite, picked up a slice of toast and proceeded to spread it liberally all over the bread.

I'll never forget the look of shock and horror that came over him when he bit into the toast!

However, once proper Marmite handling had been explained to him, it proved a great hit and my mum had to send him a large jar every Christmas for several years.

Anyone know what that German stuff was called?

Nutella (2.00 / 1) (#122)
by quarnap on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:11:51 PM EST

You are probably thinking of Nutella. It is made from hazlenuts and cocoa. Very tasty indeed.

[ Parent ]
Vegemite, Nutella. Mix. Run. (5.00 / 2) (#128)
by Alias on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 01:23:53 PM EST

If you're confusing Vegemite and Nutella, you should start worrying...

Stéphane "Alias" Gallay -- Damn! My .sig is too lon
[ Parent ]
Nope (5.00 / 1) (#165)
by GrassyKnoll on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 08:38:05 AM EST

Nope. Nutella is VERY different (and available in the UK anyway)

[ Parent ]
Zuckerrübenkraut (none / 0) (#135)
by uks on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:15:42 PM EST

Sugarbeet syrup (Zuckerrübenkraut) is a sweet, black (dark-dark brown), viscous stuff with the consistency of thick honey. It's made in Germany and is very nice stuff indeed. Although you can put it on bread rather thickly I prefer it actually fairly thin: not only does my meager supply last longer but the taste is then not so overwhelming. I've had vegemite, too, once and would love to find some again. FWIW, I very much dislike peanut butter...

[ Parent ]
The brand name is: Grafschafter Goldsaft (4.00 / 1) (#163)
by Triggerle on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 06:57:41 AM EST

It is some kind of siroup stuff made from sugar beet.

http://www.grafschafter.de/index_golds.htm


"and if I go north...will you still hunt me?"
[ Parent ]

Thanks! (none / 0) (#164)
by GrassyKnoll on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 08:36:46 AM EST

Thanks! That certainly looks like the stuff. Now to hunt some down...

[ Parent ]
Zuckerrübensirup with Hazelnutbutter.. (none / 0) (#184)
by gfp on Sun Mar 17, 2002 at 10:58:18 AM EST

...deeply improves the taste. just try it. everyone likes to smear them over each other differently... much better than that Nutella crap... ;-}

[ Parent ]
Can't be a real food. (4.00 / 4) (#121)
by Mr. Piccolo on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 12:08:42 PM EST

There's no way Vegemite can be a real food, since none of the Iron Chefs have ever used it in any of their wonderful creations!








...Then again, there is no Iron Chef Australian...

The BBC would like to apologise for the following comment.


I know an american who eats it. (4.00 / 4) (#129)
by rebelcool on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 01:29:02 PM EST

I used to work with him. He'd bring in vegemite sandwiches. We'd ask 'what the hell is that, paul?'
"Why its vegemite! The greatest food ever!"
"What's it made of?"
"Yeast extract and some other shit."
"Ah so thats what that smell is..."
"You want a taste?"
"Keep it to yourself, yeast-boy"

*shudder*

COG. Build your own community. Free, easy, powerful. Demo site

Can you get it in the Bay Area??? (3.40 / 5) (#131)
by SvnLyrBrto on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 02:49:40 PM EST

I got to try it once. My mom aquired a jar of it when I was a teenager. I've no idea where or how she got it tho. I lived in Florida at the time. And the south is not exactly known for being open to the artifacts of foreign cultures.

And I loved the stuff. I wouldn't exactly call it a substitute for peanut butter. But it definately has it's place. Or at least it would, if I could find the damn stuff!

Now, of course, I live in California, which is well known for being open and accepting of other cultures. But I still can't find the stuff (Tho I DID find a stock of Gnutella at a Safeway once). I'm SURE that it's here SOMEWHERE. But I would feel pretty psychotic going from grocrey to grocrey just looking for vegemite.

So does anyone know of a place in the Bay Area (perferably in The City itself), where I could reliably find the stuff?


cya,
john

Imagine all the people...

Gnutella at Safeway!? (4.00 / 3) (#136)
by theElectron on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 04:38:31 PM EST

Tho I DID find a stock of Gnutella at a Safeway once

Wow, now that's a suprise. I wonder if they provide a copy of the source code when you buy it...?

Unless of course you're talking about the chocolate/hazelnut mung that's called Nutella.

--
Join the NRA!
[ Parent ]

Vegemite Trading (4.00 / 1) (#144)
by D Jade on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:18:17 PM EST

My uncle lives in America, and we send him over a Giant Jar of Vegemite every year or so.

Other than that, I don't think there is any other way to get Vegemite in America.

You're a shitty troll, so stop pretending you have more of a life than a cool dude -- HollyHopDrive
[ Parent ]

Nutella Rocks (5.00 / 1) (#156)
by sandor on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 02:13:57 AM EST

I grew up eating Peanut Butter and Jelly lunches (admittedly I could eat pb&j every day...still) almost everyday. During the summers that I spent in Hungary I ran discovered the almighty Nutella.

Totally rocked; chocolate, hazelnut AND I could spread it on top of my beloved peanut butter. I would be in heaven for the summer and however long the supply that we brought back would last (um, uh, maybe 3, possibly 4 days...)

The goodlife would come crashing down when we got back to the US at the end of August(s). Nutella was nowhere to be found here until the late 80's. I once had to go 6 years without it. I *really* love that stuff. These days I see it everywhere and found a crepe place that uses it right down the street.

Too bad its only like a million calories a spooonful.

[ Parent ]
Marmite @ Piedmont Grocery & Berkeley Bowl (none / 0) (#169)
by zeoslap on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 01:17:16 PM EST

Both are in the east bay, although I don't recall seeing vegimite anywhere though (although I've never looked cos you can't beat my mate marmite)

textads.biz - sell textads on your site!
[ Parent ]
in US (5.00 / 1) (#173)
by chale on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 10:26:08 PM EST

look for a WholeFoods, WildOats, or TraderJoes. also, many small specialty health food stores will usually stock it.

clarence
When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. -John Muir
[ Parent ]

you should be able to... (5.00 / 1) (#178)
by sunyata on Sat Mar 16, 2002 at 01:08:43 PM EST

find it anywhere, at least in its Marmite configuration, (which I find preferable). Try rainbow grocery, haight fillmore natural foods, cripes maybe even cala foods. I live in Washington state and we have marmite in the regular grocery store, so i am sure since wa state is a podunk-ville, that any of those places in the city would have at least Marmite. good luck. try a chip buttie.

[ Parent ]
yummy! (2.50 / 4) (#142)
by kaffiene on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 09:00:59 PM EST

Being a New Zealander I should probably claim that Marmite is much better, but bugger it - Vegemite is just so yummy!

Marmite tastes like feces (3.00 / 1) (#176)
by wbd on Sat Mar 16, 2002 at 06:48:06 AM EST

Being a New Zealander too, I can't understand how people can eat it.

[ Parent ]
Funny. I love Marmite... (none / 0) (#193)
by SIGFPE on Wed Mar 27, 2002 at 03:23:56 PM EST

...and I always thought that Vegemite tasted like bile. In fact I can think of only one food that tastes worse - Hershey's Milk Chocolate.
SIGFPE
[ Parent ]
<b>Some Vegemite Facts</b> (4.50 / 4) (#145)
by D Jade on Thu Mar 14, 2002 at 11:26:41 PM EST

  1. Vegemite is not Marmite... They are two totally different spreads. We used to have Vegemite and Marmite at home, because half of the family liked each.
  2. A note to Americans: Did you know that the peanut butter experience can be enhanced with Vegemite? WoW!
    A favorite Aussie breakfast routine involves making one piece of toast with Peanut butter on it, and one with Vegemite on it. It is an amazing flavour sensation!
  3. Only a sick-minded individual would confuse Nutella with Vegemite... The horror!


You're a shitty troll, so stop pretending you have more of a life than a cool dude -- HollyHopDrive
Absolutely, mate (none / 0) (#190)
by CaptainZapp on Tue Mar 19, 2002 at 05:53:17 AM EST

Only a sick-minded individual would confuse Nutella with Vegemite... The horror!

You're so right! What a gross insult to Nutella...

[ Parent ]

Sewer ray may taste like pumpkin pie... (4.00 / 3) (#161)
by Demiurge on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 05:09:23 AM EST

You know how the rest of it goes.

i tried it last night (3.66 / 3) (#166)
by StackyMcRacky on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 08:53:14 AM EST

it tastes like beef bullion. it was weird, but not terrible.

you people actually make sandwiches with it on purpose? it seems more like a soup flavoring, to me.



Vegemite, Marmite, Promite... (4.16 / 6) (#167)
by Kugyou on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 11:41:43 AM EST

Real men eat THERMITE.
-----------------------------------------
Dust in the wind bores holes in mountains
Terry Pratchett's take on vegemite (3.66 / 6) (#171)
by Tatarigami on Fri Mar 15, 2002 at 04:17:40 PM EST

"We tried it, and then we all went 'yuck', and then we had some more."

Yes, that's exactly what it's like.

I'll stick with my peanut butter thank you (2.66 / 3) (#174)
by Rhinobird on Sat Mar 16, 2002 at 02:26:54 AM EST

I tried vegimite once...a little 1 inch square jobbie...i gagged for half an hour. At least until I could get ahold of some water to wash that piece of salted bread down. If I can find some I might try it again, it's been over 10 years since I tried it and my tastes have changed greatly since I was a kid. Until I can find some, all of you are wrong, yeast extract blows, go eat some peanut butter toast and do yourself a favor.
"If Mr. Edison had thought more about what he was doing, he wouldn't sweat as much." --Nikola Tesla
Its nice if you have it.. (none / 0) (#179)
by RandomAction on Sat Mar 16, 2002 at 03:11:39 PM EST

..with Jam, do you call it 'Jello'? They provide a nice contrast. From the department of usless information.

[ Parent ]
Jam is Jam (4.50 / 2) (#183)
by Rhinobird on Sun Mar 17, 2002 at 07:48:49 AM EST

Nope I call preserves "jam", Jelly i call "jelly" and that flavored gelatine crap i call "jell-o". I put the first 2 on bread and eat the last one I eat seperate with whipped cream.
"If Mr. Edison had thought more about what he was doing, he wouldn't sweat as much." --Nikola Tesla
[ Parent ]
I wish vegemite had more options... (none / 0) (#186)
by bouncer on Mon Mar 18, 2002 at 02:34:19 AM EST

I really dislike the default flag : --ass-flavoured ;)


"There's nothing like a room full of stupid people who agree with you to convince you to change your mind." --JCB
Weird national foods (none / 0) (#191)
by hucke on Tue Mar 19, 2002 at 11:07:59 AM EST

I'm an American, and first learned of Vegemite in the mid 1990s from the newsgroup rec.food.cooking. One of the periodic FAQ posts there was "Ray's List of Weird and Disgusting Foods" (which can now be found at http://www.andreas.com/food.html). It begins:

I HAVE A THEORY that many (all?) cultures invent a food that is weird or disgusting to non-initiates as a sort of a "marker." The kids start out hating it, but at some point they cross over and perpetuate it (perpetrate it) on the next generation. Then they nudge each other when foreigners gasp.

The list is organized by country, with the local "delicacies" listed. From England there is Blood Pudding, Jellied Eels... Scotland has Haggis and Irn Bru... Norwegian lutefisk, Chinese hundred-year-old eggs...

I took it as a challenge. I have never encountered most of the items on the list, but if the opportunity arises, I will try something. I have eaten lutefisk, hundred-year-old eggs, escargots, durian candy, sweetbreads (calf's pancreas), natto, uni (sea urchin), kim chee... I'm still looking for a haggis; I've promised a friend I would bring him a haggis, and he has informed me he will defend his house with his crossbow to prevent me from befouling it by bringing haggis through the doorway.

Marmite was easy to find. In Chicago, it's sold in "Treasure Island" grocery stores (they do not have vegemite). I liked it immediately. Vegemite seemed unobtainable, but I finally located it at "Cost Plus World Market", for about $2.20 a jar (half the cost of Marmite). I found that I liked it better than Marmite, and on my second visit to that store, bought ten jars.

Generally, I eat it on bagels smeared with cream cheese - that's an easy way to get started, as the cream cheese tends to mute the taste somewhat. I will also occasionally get a cheese-only sub from SU8W4Y and smear that with vegemite. Today, I tried it on buttered toast for the first time (after reading this thread) and found that to be an excellent way to showcase the salty, yeasty flavor; I think that will now be my preferred method.

Three people I worked with have tried it, on bread or crackers. One had a mild dislike for it, the others hated it intensely, and still refer to the incident whenever I suggest they try something new...

matt hucke * graveyards of chicago - http://graveyards.com/

An Iowan View (for what it's worth) (none / 0) (#192)
by jbzone on Sun Mar 24, 2002 at 02:40:25 PM EST

I live in Iowa, where some of the more unique aspects of international cuisine have not had great success in making inroads. However, I have tried it in Australia, and could see eating it more frequently if it were available.

However, Iowa in the last few years has overtaken Wisconsin in becoming the fattest state in the Union. This has come after many years of public initiatives urging us to consume as much deep-fried food as possible, dipping it in vegetable shortening or lard, if available. Eventually, we overtook our neighbors to the nort-east whose diet consists mainly of cheese and Milwaukee-brewed beer. The point is, I'm not sure if there are that many people that are suffering from malnutrition who would have the finances to seek unique foods to supplement their inadequate diets. Almost all of us get enough in what we eat daily, anyway.

Why You Probably Hate Vegemite and Why You Shouldn't | 193 comments (191 topical, 2 editorial, 0 hidden)
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