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[P]
Steve Jobs' MacWorld New York 2002 Keynote

By athagon in Technology
Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 04:09:05 AM EST
Tags: News (all tags)
News

At 9AM EST this morning, Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computers, delivered his MacWorld New York 2002 Keynote address. The infamous speech, which was broadcast live via QuickTime (and is now being re-broadcast), included many of the expected -- and some unexpected -- announcements, as reported by many different news sites and communities. Although I, myself, was not able to watch the Keynote, I have assembled a report, nonetheless, using information from the various news sites.


Real Networks announced a public beta of their RealOne media player. This is a pleasant surprise to many Mac OS X users; the release of a RealOne player for Mac OS X has been anticipated, debated, and requested for some time. The beta player, announced this morning and released (quietly) last night, is available as a free download today.

Mac OS X 10.2: Jaguar was officially announced, although the system has been in leaked-beta test form for some time, along with having a small page on Apple's website. The system reportedly boasts over 150 new features, including spring-loaded folders, Finder search, desktop background switching, .Mac integration, and Sherlock 3 (see below). Disappointingly, the system will be a full-price ($129) upgrade to anyone who purchased a Mac without 10.2 on or before 7/16/02. Persons purchasing a Mac today or later will get it for free from an authorized Apple Store/retailer, or for $20 through the website. It will be available for purchase and upgrade on August 24th.

Sherlock 3 appears to finally have graduated into a full-fledged system and internet search utility. Formerly a poorly-implemented version of the upcoming software, with it's roots in a simple find box, Sherlock 3 boasts many new features. It offers everything from disk searching, to eBay auctions, flight planning, yellow pages, stocks, and text translation software.

iCal, which will be a free download from Apple's website in September, is a free, and unanticipated, calendar application from Apple. It boasts internet connectivity for calendar sharing.

iSync, another unexpected application, was also announced. The app promises synchronization between your Mac, your cell phone (Bluetooth equipped), your iPod, .Mac (see below), and your Palm pilot.

iTunes 3 was also announced, a free download as of today, boasting many new features. Included is connectivity to audible.com, Smart Playlists, Sound Check and Track Ratings, Join Tracks, import/export of playlists, and play-count MP3 tags (among other things). The Smart Playlists feature is especially exciting, offering the ability to have a playlist automatically update its tracks when a particular artists's songs are added or removed from the general library, among other things.

Rest In Peace, iTools. To the dismay of Mac users and Keynote-goers worldwide, Mr. Jobs announced the end of the free iTools service, which was first started with the release of Mac OS 9. The previously free service, now renamed ".Mac," will no longer be free -- it now boasts an annual pricetag of $100 ($50 for the first year for current members). Although the announcement was laden with typical Jobs-hype and new features (virus protection software, a larger iDisk, more email space, etc.), the announcement was greeted with stony silence instead of the expected applause.

iTools was originally a hyped service for Mac OS 9. You would sign up, get 20MB of free online storage space, an email account, greeting cards, some web space, online "photo albums", and a few other things. Later, they added the ability to upgrade your iDisk (20MB storage) to a higher limit, with an annual payment. This latest revision changes the name from "iTools" to ".Mac," and removes the possibility of a free service.

On a lighter note, the iPod underwent major changes. The 5GB model's price was lowered to a rocky $299, and the 10GB version was lowered to $399. Thankfully, and to little surprise, Mr. Jobs also announced a 20GB version of the iPod, which goes for the standard $499. The new models boast a solid-state jog wheel and "FireWire door" to protect the sensitive ports, and the 10GB and 20GB models also come with a wired remote, carrying case, and 10% thinner width. The software for the iPod was updated using iTunes 3; the new iPods use all of iTunes 3's new features (see above) as well as iCal support (see above). The new iPods will be in stores in August, with the new accessories being made available to current owners for $39.

To the joy of many PC users, Mr. Jobs also announced that Apple has been working with Musicmatch software, and will be providing PC support. The Windows versions of the iPods will also be in stores in August.

QuickTime 6, a free download for Mac and Windows users, was also shown. Among other things, it boasts new MPEG4 support, Flash 5 support, better streaming, and a slightly updated interface.

Finally, a new version of the iMac was also announced, as expected. The new model boasts a 17" flatpanel LCD screen, with cinematic aspect ratios and 1440x900 pixels. It also carries a nVidia GeForce4 graphics card, and a pricetag of $1,999. It will also be available in August.

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Poll
Coolest thing at the Keynote
o Jaguar 47%
o iMac 12%
o iCal 0%
o iSync 2%
o iTunes 0%
o iPod 12%
o .Mac 0%
o His Steveness 25%

Votes: 40
Results | Other Polls

Related Links
o Apple Computers
o QuickTime
o re-broadca st
o many
o different
o news
o sites
o communitie s
o Real Networks
o iTunes 3
o audible.co m
o iTools
o iPod
o QuickTime 6
o iMac
o Also by athagon


Display: Sort:
Steve Jobs' MacWorld New York 2002 Keynote | 47 comments (38 topical, 9 editorial, 1 hidden)
Don't forget: Microsoft supports the Mac! (2.11 / 17) (#7)
by Steve Ballmer on Wed Jul 17, 2002 at 05:48:55 PM EST

K5 readers qualify for special pricing on Office v. X! Hurry, before this offer ends!

To translate for Windows users... (2.80 / 10) (#9)
by DeadBaby on Wed Jul 17, 2002 at 06:45:28 PM EST

-Mac users can now use Real One. Soon they'll realize they don't want to.

-Mac users are getting OSX ME soon.

-Mac users are getting an improved search tool that no one will use, favoring google.com instead.

-Apple is releasing a handful of apps for the Mac that Windows users can find equivalents for at just about any shareware site. Just search for calendar software and/or hand held synchronization.

-Mac users can now buy iMac's with 17 inch screens... Windows users can now buy PC's with any size or number of monitors they want. See pricewatch.com for the best values.

No. I'm not bashing the Mac but come on... Mac World is just a hype machine. These things are very boring and expected. They don't deserve coverage on every major news site in existance, considering a whopping 3% of the computing world will have access to this stuff.
"Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us." - Carl Sagan

uh .. no! (4.00 / 2) (#10)
by woof on Wed Jul 17, 2002 at 08:49:04 PM EST

-Mac users are getting OSX ME soon.

Uh? Jaguar is OSX 10.2, a quite big upgrade. It adds support for many things. You can't compare that to a windows version "numbering"...

Mac users are getting an improved search tool that no one will use, favoring google.com instead.

The search tool that has been added to the Finder is to be used as `grep` is used when parsing the output of `ls`, that is, do a quick filtering on large directories. Nothing to do with google. (Unless you open a web server on you root partition .. uhm well ..)

-Apple is releasing a handful of apps for the Mac that Windows users can find equivalents for at just about any shareware site. Just search for calendar software and/or hand held synchronization.

I'd like to see how well these apps integrate into windows ..
--
"How many cables do you want to burn today? Go Wireless!"
Already three cables burned!
[ Parent ]
Sherlock is advertised as an all-in-wonder thingie (none / 0) (#19)
by carbon on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 04:07:53 AM EST

The search tool that has been added to the Finder is to be used as `grep` is used when parsing the output of `ls`, that is, do a quick filtering on large directories.

$ ls --web http://www.ebay.com | grep "playstation 2 controller"

Or not...


Wasn't Dr. Claus the bad guy on Inspector Gadget? - dirvish
[ Parent ]
But it's not Sherlock (none / 0) (#21)
by woof on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 06:08:07 AM EST

It's a small input field in the Finder windows, ala iTunes.

*looks for screenshots*

here
--
"How many cables do you want to burn today? Go Wireless!"
Already three cables burned!
[ Parent ]
sherlock and find file (none / 0) (#24)
by Altus on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 11:13:33 AM EST

are now separate things.  find is going to be in every finder window, which is great because I just want to find shit.

sherlock is being  converted to system services which could be cool.  It would be nice to be able to highlight text and automatically search the web, or ebay, or a directory listing.

hell, now that they are sercies maby apple will develop data detectors for mac os X.  it would be great to be able to higlight a name and get a drop down of matching listings from your prefered directory listings including sub menus for emailing them or IMing them...

maybe I will write that... hummm

 
"In America, first you get the sugar, then you get the money, then you get the women..." -H. Simpson
[ Parent ]

Translation error (3.80 / 5) (#11)
by sacrelicious on Wed Jul 17, 2002 at 08:58:26 PM EST

-Mac users are getting OSX ME soon.

I agree with everything but this statement. Windows ME was a complete and utter waste of time and money. Many people who need DOS/16 bit layer still use Win98SE, even though it's older. ME offered no features (other than a slight UI rev. to match win2k), and was a hell of a lot more buggy.

In comparison, OSX is a good, stable, 32-bit, OS that is getting better all the time. Yeah, it sucks to have to pay to upgrade, and I think Apple will rescind that policy (do your part and complain here)

[ Parent ]

How about... (none / 0) (#15)
by DeadBaby on Wed Jul 17, 2002 at 10:01:11 PM EST

Ok, maybe that was unfair...

How about OSX XP? (compared to 2k, not me or 98)
"Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity -- in all this vastness -- there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves. It is up to us." - Carl Sagan
[ Parent ]

"ME" (none / 0) (#16)
by pb on Wed Jul 17, 2002 at 10:18:37 PM EST

In that case, just think of "ME" as standing for *M*inor *U*pdate. (which is what it was, really...)

Personally, I hate it when companies charge for a "NEW" OS, when in reality it's just an old OS wearing a funny hat.  I remember paying for the upgrade disks for MS-DOS 6.2 and 6.22 (from 6.00), and although they didn't add a whole lot, at least they were reasonably priced; Apple could have done the same thing here and released a small update for a low fee, online even.  But no, apparently it's worth $129.00 to get a "whole new" OS, and not $12.95 to get a few changes.

Microsoft is still slightly better about this, (charging $99 instead of $199 for upgrades) but their pricing scheme is still extortion for the added value their upgrades usually provide.  I guess paying a small price for an "incremental upgrade" is a thing of the past; at least I can still upgrade my Linux box free of charge...
---
"See what the drooling, ravening, flesh-eating hordes^W^W^W^WKuro5hin.org readers have to say."
-- pwhysall
[ Parent ]

this is (none / 0) (#23)
by Altus on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 11:09:27 AM EST

 a pretty substantial upgrade.  sure, it would be nice if there was a $50 upgrade price for 10.2 but it does have alot of features that make it worth buying.  quartz extreeme should speed up everything quite nicely and even without it (in the betas) people have reported considerable speed increses (on the order of 30%).

It includes handwriting recogntion, which is only cool if you have a tablet, but still many mac users do.  the new Rendezvous networking model sounds interesting although since it was just announced I dont know much about it.  and it has a variety of updates to the finder which should improve peoples experience with the os.

this is just the limited stuff I have found in a few minutes.  try starting here (http://www.apple.com/macosx/) for more info on 10.2

 
"In America, first you get the sugar, then you get the money, then you get the women..." -H. Simpson
[ Parent ]

Buy what you want. Don't buy what you don't want. (3.00 / 1) (#34)
by kwerle on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 05:31:48 PM EST

Personally, I hate it when users buy a "NEW" OS, when in reality it's just an old OS wearing a funny hat, then complain that it's not a new OS.  I remember hearing about someone paying for the upgrade disks for MS-DOS 6.2 and 6.22 (from 6.00), when they didn't need the upgrade; Apple could have done the same thing here and released lame updates for a low fee*, online even.  But no, apparently it's worth $129.00 to me to get a few really cool new features in the OS, and not $12.95 to get a couple of lame changes.

* Oh, wait - isn't that worse than what apple does?  They use the system updater to ship updates to all the apps they ship (automatically), as well as security updates, etc.

[ Parent ]

somewhat... (none / 0) (#39)
by pb on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 08:13:34 PM EST

Apparently; just about everyone does that these days.  But not in this case...
---
"See what the drooling, ravening, flesh-eating hordes^W^W^W^WKuro5hin.org readers have to say."
-- pwhysall
[ Parent ]
Question about Sherlock 3... (3.00 / 1) (#13)
by thenick on Wed Jul 17, 2002 at 09:33:44 PM EST

Did Apple pay for the use of Watson, or did they rip it off?

 
"Doing stuff is overrated. Like Hitler, he did a lot, but don't we all wish he would have stayed home and gotten stoned?" -Dex

the latter (none / 0) (#14)
by athagon on Wed Jul 17, 2002 at 09:50:30 PM EST

They just ripped it off.

[ Parent ]
Karelia, Apple, Sherlock, Watson. (4.50 / 2) (#40)
by Xenex on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 11:11:05 PM EST

Karelia are the creators of Watson, and they have posted a FAQ about the "relationship" between Watson and Sherlock 3.

To quote:
"Many users have contacted Karelia, congratulating us on Apple "buying out" Watson. However, Karelia Software was not involved in any aspect of Sherlock 3, other than serving as ... shall we say ... inspiration. While Apple recently recognized Watson as 2002's "Most Innovative Mac OS X Product" -- and we appreciate the recognition -- the company didn't hesitate to make use of Watson's specific innovations for its next OS release, without any concessions to Karelia."

To be honest, I'm suprised Apple simply didn't buy Watson from them. Apple have show with iTunes that they're over the "Not invented here" syndrome, so I just don't understand why they didn't do the same on this occasion.

Either way, the way Apple seem to have treated Karelia is woeful. And giving Watson an award for innovation adds insult to injury.


It's what's not there that makes what's there what it is.
[ Parent ]

I hope Apple gets their asses sued (none / 0) (#43)
by thenick on Fri Jul 19, 2002 at 01:10:03 PM EST

I love Apple, but jeez, Sherlock 3 "looks and feels" exactly like Watson. I kind of assumed that Apple paid for Watson because of a recent press picture I saw on Apple's website. It showed the main programmer of Watson smiling for the cameras in an Apple trade show booth. I guess I was wrong.

Watson is a innovative program that I was proud to show to non-OSX users. It highlights the programming skills that exist in the Macintosh developer community, and Apple just flat out screwed Karelia. I hope Apple pays through the nose for this mistake.

 
"Doing stuff is overrated. Like Hitler, he did a lot, but don't we all wish he would have stayed home and gotten stoned?" -Dex
[ Parent ]

Hmm (2.50 / 2) (#17)
by carbon on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 03:35:57 AM EST

Last I checked, there was already an ical application on UNIX, and it's been around for some time now.



Wasn't Dr. Claus the bad guy on Inspector Gadget? - dirvish
iPod thicknesses (4.00 / 4) (#20)
by chrismear on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 05:18:09 AM EST

Actually, what Steve Jobs hushed over a bit is that the new 20GB iPod is thicker than the original. Here's the details:

5GB: original case: 0.78 in
10GB: new slim case: 0.72 in
20GB: new-style case, but: 0.84 in

However, both the 10GB and the 20GB get the new solid-state jog wheel and all that frappery.

The details can be found on the iPods' Tech Specs page.



one question (none / 0) (#27)
by athagon on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 12:30:01 PM EST

How is the 20GB case's style different than then 10GB case?

[ Parent ]
ouch, 129? (3.00 / 1) (#22)
by mikeliu on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 08:12:22 AM EST

Mac OS X 10.2: Jaguar was officially announced, although the system has been in leaked-beta test form for some time, along with having a small page on Apple's website. The system reportedly boasts over 150 new features, including spring-loaded folders, Finder search, desktop background switching, .Mac integration, and Sherlock 3 (see below). Disappointingly, the system will be a full-price ($129) upgrade to anyone who purchased a Mac without 10.2 on or before 7/16/02. Persons purchasing a Mac today or later will get it for free from an authorized Apple Store/retailer, or for $20 through the website. It will be available for purchase and upgrade on August 24th.

Ouch!  $129 for a .1 version increase on the OS?  If it's that much of a difference that they can't provide a free upgrade why is the version number only bumped by .1?  If it's not that much of a difference $129 is very very steep for an update.  From the description it seems sorta like a super-service pack for Windows.  Maybe like what you'd get if you got a bunch of service packs combined into one.  But that bunch of service packs are free for Windows.....I hate to say it, and I might get labeled a troll for it, but it sorta seems like the service from Microsoft is a little better.....

I mean, what does 150 features even mean?  Besides the 5 listed are there even any updates that people care about in there?  Even in that group of five which I'm sure are there headlining 5 improvements, some strike me as pretty sketchy.  I can't imagine that many people care much about .Mac integration, especially considering the hefty price.  People hardly consider MSN integration a feature.  And what is a spring-loaded folder, and how can it improve my productivity over "normal" folders (I'm simply ignorant on this one, pardon me if it turns out to be something really great)?

Spring Loaded Folders (4.50 / 2) (#25)
by MilTan on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 11:40:05 AM EST

From my understanding, a spring loaded folder operates thusly (I'll express this in standard Windows terms, since I don't actually know much about Macs):

Suppose you have a file in C:\ and you would like to move it to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Common Files\VC++\Projects (I think that might even be a valid directory on many systems?). You have two options, if you choose to use the graphical interfaces provided to you by Windows - Explorer and Windows Explorer.

With the first, you would cut the file you have in C:\ and browse your way to that godawful location you want to move it to. You could then paste the file to that location. This is a relatively slow process, and you wind up with one of two unattractive situations: Either you don't open folders into the same window, and you know have 4 extra windows to close; or you do keep them in the same window, and you must now browse back to a more useful directory.

With the second option, you could either perform the task similarly to the first, or you could use the tree browser and open up the heirarchy until you got to your destination. Then you would drag and drop the file into the appropriate folder. Except potentially you would have to scroll up and down the tree browser while holding onto the file to do this - something that I find fairly annoying. Or, you could be like me and just eschew Windows Explorer altogether.

With spring loaded folders, you would do it like this: You would start in something that looks like Explorer, in the root directory. You would click and drag the file you want onto the Program Files folder, and hold it there. This would then automagically open the folder (while you're still holding the file. Then you would drag to the MS Common Files folder, doing the same thing, and so on and so forth. But here's the kicker. Once you're done dropping the file, the window will revert back to the root directory. Thus, spring loaded.

Maybe it doesn't seem like all that useful of a tool. But I think it's neat, and I could see how it would save me some time. That, and the annoyance of moving around back and forth through directory structures. It just seems to be one of those neat, useful interface things that Apple likes to do.

[ Parent ]
Not very impressive (none / 0) (#26)
by gauntlet on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 12:01:51 PM EST

If you have the hierarchy of folders visible in windows explorer, the same functionality can be had by dragging a file over folders in the hierarchy.

Plus, using the hierarchy the folders are in a predictable order, and you can't accidentally drop your file onto another file.

If this, charging for a formerly free service, and some version upgrades is all Apple has to boast about, something's wrong.

Into Canadian Politics?
[ Parent ]

no and no (4.00 / 1) (#29)
by calimehtar on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 01:46:16 PM EST

First of all, it is at least a bit better than the windows implementation if only because it's always there. Personally I never use the folder hierarchy view on Windows so I never have access to anything resembling spring-loaded folders. Presumably Apple will apply the spring-loaded folders to all folder views as they did with OS 9. In this case, of course, you could drag a file from one view-type (ie alpha-ordered list) into another (standard icon view) seamlessly. No need to set things up in advance. This is the kind of feature that users don't need to be taught, they just try it and it works.

Secondly, read the article. There are some new software products, some very cool new features (address book to cellpone sync via bluetooth built-in), and some minor hardware upgrades. True, it's nothing more than the usual Macworld, but Apple does have a few things to boast about.



[ Parent ]
.1 isn't insignificant (5.00 / 2) (#31)
by bill_mcgonigle on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 05:13:56 PM EST

Typically +0.1 is a features release.  .0.1 is a bug-fix release.  1.0 is a architecture release.

Consider Linux 2.0,2.2,2.4,2.6, which are really 2.0,2.1,2.2,2.3, except for the strange linux habit of using odd minor versions for development branches.  

Windows has gone from version 3 to 5 in the past 13 years (look under the covers).

The Apple marketing people just got overzealous and have wound up with System 7.9 being called OS 9.2, artificially inflating expectations.  The OS that was to be the next-gen OS at Apple before Jobs came on board (Copland) was to be called Mac OS 8.  I still have a demo CD of it.  The major version rev from 9 to 10 (X) was quite appropriate, it's 7 to 8 to 9 that was bogus.

Now, we're back to reasonable version numbering.

[ Parent ]

Then don't buy it. (4.00 / 1) (#32)
by kwerle on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 05:19:26 PM EST

Don't like the features/$?  Don't buy it!  I'm REALLY looking forward to Rendezvous, and QuartzExtreme on our iMac (won't run on the iBook I have - bummer).

Realistically, a top-of-the-line game will cost you about $50, new (Warcraft III is $60).  For a little more than the cost of 2 games, they are delivering a whole lotta bang.

Realistically, I don't think there will be binary compatability issues, so you can pass on this if you'd like.

[ Parent ]

confusion (none / 0) (#33)
by athagon on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 05:28:39 PM EST

Even though all the Apple-hype, I'm not really sure what Rendezvous is -- could you explain it to me, please?

[ Parent ]
Rendezvous as I understand it (5.00 / 3) (#35)
by kwerle on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 06:04:59 PM EST

The short answer is that it is AppleTalk done RIGHT.

I have a notebook computer, or a computer that I've just plugged in to some LAN.  Because the LAN admin is good, they have set up a bunch of servers and services.  The one that everyone does now is DHCP.  This get's the notebook it's IP address, it's default route, and maybe one or two other bits of info.  For this example we'll assume no YP.

What about printers?  Where are they?  Does the LAN have a web proxy?  Does it server NFS?  What volumes?  Is there a mail gateway?  SMTP server?  All those other services you'd like to know about without having to ask.

Great.  Now what about your 'peers' on the LAN...  Are any of them serving webdav?  Shoutcast?  iTunes?  Do any of them have webservers?  Wouldn't it be cool if your system just knew?

Rendezvous wants to make it possible to hook a computer up to a network and discover everything easily.  In general this means Multicast queries.

For REAL documentation, see http://www.zeroconf.org/.

The pdf document at http://www.zeroconf.org/w3onwire-zeroconf.pdf seems especially helpful.

[ Parent ]

Hmm (none / 0) (#38)
by athagon on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 07:58:17 PM EST

It sounds interesting. I guess one of my questions would be, is this system-based, or application-based? In other words, would you just hook your computer up to ether, and have it automatically configure itself, or would you go into the Rendezvous application to do it?

Also, I'm currently on a LAN -- will Rendezvous change the current in-place settings for things?

[ Parent ]

Really, read the documents from zeroconf.org (none / 0) (#42)
by kwerle on Fri Jul 19, 2002 at 12:02:00 PM EST

They will answer your questions better than I will.  You ask if it is system-base, or if there is a configuration app for it.  Maybe some of both.  But a system is merely a suite of applications!  What I imagine, for many of the services, is that it will be a migratory path.  Let's say you connect a LAN that has the following Rendezvous announced services:

SMTP server
Web Proxy
(one) Shoutcast server

And let's say you're running linux sometime after Rendezvous is released and somewhat embraced.  Your mail program does not yet do rendezvous - you're hosed and have to do that manually.  Your music player is up to speed and does Rendezvous itself, so it just sees the Shoutcast server immediately.  Your browser is not yet Rendezvous aware, but we'll say that your linux disty ships with a 'Rendezvous config client'.  You run this client and it discovers [some of the] Rendezvous servers and sets the appropriate environment variables, including the http_proxy - so your browser get's a free boost...

Does that answer your question?

[ Parent ]

Halfway (none / 0) (#44)
by athagon on Fri Jul 19, 2002 at 02:08:20 PM EST

Well, sort of. I guess what I really wanted to know was whether or not Rendezvous will screw up my already in-place manual LAN settings. ;)

Though, I don't expect Apple would make the mistake of forcing Rendezvous on your settings, even if they work fine already; are already configured.

[ Parent ]

No, Rendezvous will not hose you (none / 0) (#46)
by kwerle on Fri Jul 19, 2002 at 05:45:31 PM EST

One of the requirements (form the docs mentioned) is that Rendezvous MUST NOT break existing configuration standards.

[ Parent ]
Yes, Jaguar is worth it (5.00 / 1) (#41)
by jaffray on Fri Jul 19, 2002 at 03:55:36 AM EST

Quartz Extreme alone is worth the cost of admission - reports from the beta users are that it massively improves display responsiveness.

I expect to find iCal, Sherlock 3, the centralized Address Book, better Windows-network integration, and Finder improvements very useful in my everyday computing.  I have high hopes for Rendezvous and iSync, though I don't know enough details to know whether they'll help me.

The Universal Access features are so essential that they should have been in 10.1 if not 10.0, but I'll settle for getting them now - my girlfriend (who is blind) will finally be able to use my computer effectively.

In short, this is hardly a "service pack" release, and while I wish it were cheaper, I have no doubt it'll be worth the $129.

[ Parent ]

Apple Screws us Again (4.00 / 2) (#28)
by natael on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 01:11:18 PM EST

Several years ago when iTools was first announced, I signed up and switched over to using my mac.com address for email. My thinking was that with a company like Apple, this address would be good for life. Having been forced to change my email several times in the past, I know what problems it could cause. Now when hundreds of companies have my current address in their databases, Apple forces me to either pay up $60, which I don't have, or try and change everyone's records to reflect a new address.

I guess considering I haven't paid for a software update since the OS X Public Beta, we can just call it even and leave it at that. As for me, I'm off to the bookstore to buy that great manual for Postfix I saw the other day.

"And now you're apologizing, not for insulting and denigrating people you don't

Not necessarily screwed (4.00 / 1) (#30)
by shigelojoe on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 03:37:31 PM EST

MacSlash has a link posted to a help page on Apple's website which outlines steps for changing the 'trial account' to an email-only account.

I'm guessing (and hoping) that this email-only account will be free, as it obviously doesn't include the iDisk and blah blah blah.

The option to change the account isn't up yet, but I'm confident it will be up before the e-mail accounts are erased. If not, I'd rather the $50 instead of going through the trouble of finding a new e-mail address.

[ Parent ]

Control your voice (none / 0) (#36)
by kwerle on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 06:29:03 PM EST

I came to the conclusion long ago (back in college) that the only way to do email is to control it yourself.  Certainly not let some other company (or university) control it.  Host your own domain, find a friend who hosts, or pay someone to do email.  If you're paying, make sure you trust the company you're paying.  Never trust a free mail service (unless it is from a friend).  It turns out that companies are in business to make money.  Giving away email doesn't do that.

As a solution to the address problem, I recommend a redirecter, like www.pobox.com.  There are several out there, and some are cheaper than pobox.

[ Parent ]

Jaguar is not a bugfix (5.00 / 1) (#37)
by jreilly on Thu Jul 18, 2002 at 07:10:18 PM EST

This has been addressed in many threads, but there's a few points not covered, so i'll list them here. Jaguar offers the following over 10.1
  • a hardware accelerated gui (for people with new enough macs (*sigh*)
  • gcc 3.1 in the devel kit, and used to compile the whole thing
  • rondevous, a way to make networks plug'n'play easily
  • built-in ldap support
  • an easy to use graphical interface for the already built-in bsd-style firewalling and NATing
And of course all the stuff Steve and everyone here has been talking about. Given my experience with a "preview" =) build, it's worth $129.

Oooh, shiny...
Steve Jobs' MacWorld New York 2002 Keynote | 47 comments (38 topical, 9 editorial, 1 hidden)
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